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Archive for Thursday, June 14, 2001

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TOP MUSIC
June 14, 2001
TOP MOVIES
June 14, 2001
Winston Cup points leaders
June 14, 2001
Jeff Gordon has pulled ahead of Dale Jarrett, and leads by the slim margin of 26 points.
Pocono 500 preview
June 14, 2001
Where: Pocono Raceway, a 2.5-mile triangular track in Long Pond, Pa. When: The 200-lap or 500-mile race starts at noon Sunday. Qualifying is at 2 p.m. Friday.
Phlegar Advances
June 14, 2001
Recent Free State High graduate Lauren Phlegar, who will golf for Kansas University this fall, tied for third at the Kansas Women’s Golf Assn. Junior Girls’ State Championship in Wichita.
Yankees’ Hernandez to have surgery on toe
June 14, 2001
New York Yankees right-hander Orlando Hernandez will undergo surgery on the second toe of his left foot and will be out for an undetermined amount of time. Dr. William Hamilton will perform the surgery Friday at New York’s St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center to correct instability and inflammation in the toe.
College World Series: Stanford reaches championship game
Miami or Tennessee will be opponent in Saturday’s title contest
June 14, 2001
Stanford coach Mark Marquess said throughout the College World Series that he never expected his team to get this far. The Cardinal lost their starting rotation from last season and had no seniors on the roster, but they defied the odds and surpassed their coach’s expectations by getting to the championship game for the second straight year.
Selig says disparity hurts enthusiasm
June 14, 2001
Major league owners spent considerable time Wednesday on a familiar topic the ever-growing disparity in revenues but there was no talk of eliminating franchises. There have been rumblings for months that some stronger franchises favor getting rid of some low-drawing teams, such as Montreal and Tampa Bay, to lessen the disparity in talent and reduce the large revenue-sharing payments made by big-market teams.
National League: Arizona clubs Cubs
June 14, 2001
Arizona had a club-record seven consecutive hits in a seven-run second inning Wednesday night as the Diamondbacks pounded Kevin Tapani and the Chicago Cubs 13-3. The Diamondbacks also set a franchise record with 17 singles in the game and had 19 hits overall. Luis Gonzalez, Jay Bell and Danny Bautista each had three hits.
Interleague Roundup: Thome’s homer lifts Tribe
Cleveland nips Brewers in 10 innings
June 14, 2001
Jim Thome was determined to end the Cleveland Indians’ uncharacteristic offensive frustration. Thome hit a three-run homer in the 10th inning to give the Indians a 5-2 win over the Milwaukee Brewers on Wednesday night. “We needed a hit, any kind, and that’s all I wanted to do,” Thome said. “I was just trying to shoot the ball through the middle.”
Glass leads after rolling 300
June 14, 2001
Bob Glass of Lawrence rolled a perfect 300 game on Wednesday and grabbed the overall lead at the PBA Epicenter Senior Classic. It was Glass’ 18th career 300 game. After four rounds, Glass, a five-time senior champ, has a 10-2 matchplay record and 7,382 total pins. Bob Chamberlain is second with a 7-5 mark and 7,176 pins.
Anna in doubt for Wimbledon
June 14, 2001
Anna Kournikova is in danger of missing Wimbledon after pulling out of yet another tournament, next week’s grass-court event at Eastbourne. The Russian hasn’t played since sustaining a stress fracture in her left foot in March.
NBA Finals: Lakers roll over Sixers in Game 4
June 14, 2001
About that dynasty. Now where were we? Oh, yes. Gentlemen, start your hyperbole. The Los Angeles Lakers dominated the Philadelphia 76ers, 100-86, to win Game Four of the NBA Finals Wednesday, and take a 3-1 lead with the potential clincher Friday in Philadelphia. No team has ever come back from a 3-1 deficit in the Finals.
KC rookie impressive in debut
Wilson pitches seven solid innings for win
June 14, 2001
All those red-clad St. Louis fans who keep showing up in Kansas City to cheer on the Cardinals might be better off staying home. “A lot of red shirts kind of makes you mad,” Royals manager Tony Muser said after Kris Wilson led the Royals to a 4-1 victory Wednesday night in front of 28,382 fans at Kauffman Stadium.
Woods biggest favorite in golf history
June 14, 2001
If this city’s legal bookies are right, Tiger Woods will shoot 68 or 69 today in the opening round of the U.S. Open, while everyone else struggles to break par. By Sunday, it’s even money he’ll be holding the winner’s trophy aloft on the 18th green at Southern Hills.
Lang catches Kim
Texan overtakes leader, claims one-stroke victory
June 14, 2001
By Robert Sinclair Being from Texas, Brittany Lang knows a thing or two about golfing in windy conditions. But even the teen-ager from McKinney was caught off guard by Wednesday’s weather during the final round of the Lucent Technologies Girls Junior Championship at Alvamar Country Club.
Pro Briefs
June 14, 2001
Raptors’ Davis files $50 million lawsuit Cassell survives flood in Houston traffic Croce climbs bridge to hang 76ers banner Flyers sign LeClair to multiyear contract Stars ink Helenius to one-year contract Penguins listening to offers for Jagr Lemieux says Penguins require new arena
Thirty-one years and counting for Europeans
U.S. Open has eluded Montgomerie, Faldo
June 14, 2001
Lee Westwood has played six rounds of golf this year on the PGA Tour. The birth of a baby kept him home in England, where he played occasionally on the European Tour but otherwise rested.
Everyone but Tiger playing for second
PGA Tour golfers could take U.S. Open lesson from Watson
June 14, 2001
At this weekend’s U.S. Open, a bunch of people will watch everything Tiger Woods does in awe. They will imagine what it’s like to be him and wonder why they can’t play golf like him. Unfortunately, these people are the other golfers.
Judge rules for Earnhardt
Autopsy photos won’t be made public
June 14, 2001
A judge refused to release Dale Earnhardt’s autopsy photos Wednesday, agreeing with the NASCAR great’s widow that making the pictures public would cause the family pain. “In this particular case, the release constitutes a serious invasion of the highest degree. There is no question it’s harmful, it’s unspeakable,” said Circuit Judge Joseph Will.
Patients’ rights bill gains support
June 14, 2001
Several House Republicans bucked White House opposition Wednesday and endorsed broader rights for Americans to sue their health plans. The development came amid planning by Senate Democrats, who now control the chamber, for work next week on similar patients’ rights legislation. They quickly welcomed the support.
Motorists driven to frustration
KDOT commuter survey snarls traffic around Lawrence
June 14, 2001
By Stephanie Paterik Hundreds of Lawrence motorists trapped between bumpers Wednesday wondered what was causing 30-minute delays. Few guessed it was a piece of paper. Kansas Department of Transportation officials Wednesday morning and afternoon filed vehicles into single lanes of traffic to distribute questionnaires at eight checkpoints around Lawrence. The purpose of the mail-in survey was to obtain information about driving patterns and destinations.
County Commission Briefs
June 14, 2001
Community corrections grant application OK’d New planner appointed Resident granted building permit Permit allows sale of agricultural products
Native Kansan tapped to succeed retiring dean
June 14, 2001
Kansas University reached into northeastern Pennsylvania where it found a Kansan to be its continuing education dean. JoAnn Smith, a native of Kansas City, Kan., and dean of the School of Continuing Education at Marywood University, will succeed Robert Senecal, who is retiring June 30 after 21 years as dean.
Bank sues bank to recover robber’s loot
June 14, 2001
You’ve just robbed a bank. Where better to store the booty? Why, another bank, of course. One alleged crook did just that, and his actions are at the center of a lawsuit filed by Garden Plain State Bank, which is suing Sunflower Bank to try to recover money stolen during the heist.
Janet O’Neal
June 14, 2001
Bockover services
June 14, 2001
Doctor calls suspension ‘political’
June 14, 2001
A regulatory board suspended a Great Bend doctor’s license and questioned his conduct Wednesday, but he said the state is trying to punish him for his political views.
Philippines breaks off negotiations with rebels
June 14, 2001
The government halted attempts to talk with Muslim extremists holding more than two dozen hostages and will focus on military assaults, officials said Thursday. “There’s no point in talking anymore,” National Security Adviser Roilo Golez said. “It’s all-out war.”
Lawrence Briefs
June 14, 2001
City to help sponsor fair housing seminar Students on ‘Casey’s ride’ stopping in Lawrence Home invasion reported Police make arrest in Haskell vandalism case Damage was listed at more than $2,000 Carbon monoxide thought to be cause of death Arrest made for battery on police officer Molestation charges pending
After 40 years of laughs, Bozo retires
June 14, 2001
Bozo has left the building. The clown with the bright red hair and members of the cast of what was once one of the most popular shows in television history and the longest running locally produced Bozo program in the country taped their final show Tuesday in front of about 200 people at a WGN-TV studio.
The Loomis era
Crew chief has Gordon back in contention
June 14, 2001
Robbie Loomis was on pit road, pacing. His driver, Jeff Gordon, was about to qualify and stood a good chance to win the pole for last weekend’s race at Michigan International Speedway.
Tweens’ need supervision at concerts, experts say
June 14, 2001
When is a child old enough to attend a concert alone? That question likely has been on the minds of thousands of parents whose adolescent daughters are sweating the days until they can swear their eternal affections for the Backstreet Boys.
Teen sings praises of instant messaging
Soon-to-be-released ‘I.M. Me’ already a hit with Internet-savvy youths
June 14, 2001
Thirteen-year-old singer Brittney Cleary wanted to debut with a song most children her age could relate to. So she picked a tune about love, right? Wrong. Her song is called “I.M. Me,” a reference to instant messaging, the online technology that allows computer users to carry on typewritten, private conversations in real time. Cleary, who lives in Nashville, Tenn., says she and her buddies talk online about “everything.”
Award-winning movies have short shelf life in rental stores
June 14, 2001
By Jan Biles Movies that won or were nominated for the Oscars or Golden Globes are getting the most attention at Lawrence video outlets.
Teens get the message
High school students favor instant online communication
June 14, 2001
By Lindsay O’Bryon Special to the Journal-World Move over Ma Bell, you’ve been replaced. For years America’s teens have tied up the phone lines for hours, chatting with friends. Nowadays many teens are tying up their phone or cable modem lines to dial the Internet.
Child’s identity still a mystery
June 14, 2001
She was just 3 or 4 years old. Big brown eyes. Neat cornrows in her hair. The kind of girl who would be missed. But more than six weeks after she was found beheaded in the woods in Kansas City, her identity remains a mystery.
High court allows media intervention
June 14, 2001
Two Wichita news organizations must be allowed to intervene in the criminal cases of two brothers accused of killing five people, the state Supreme Court ruled Wednesday. The Wichita Eagle and KWCH-TV, the city’s CBS affiliate, had sought to challenge an order from Sedgwick County District Judge Clark Owens sealing records normally open to the public. But Owens denied their request to intervene.
Stanford, Harvard vie for $150 million donation
June 14, 2001
A software tycoon is pitting two of the nation’s top universities against each other, inviting Harvard and Stanford to compete for the same $150 million gift. Oracle Corp. CEO Larry Ellison is prepared to give the money to either school to found an institute to study the effect of technology on politics and economics.
World Nation
June 14, 2001
Venezuela: Foot-and-mouth disease outbreak quarantined Ecuador: Landslide rescuers seek victims’ bodies
Mexican drug boss captured
June 14, 2001
The Mexican government announced Wednesday the capture of one of the country’s most wanted fugitives, Alcides Ramon Magana, a major step in President Vicente Fox’s crackdown on drug trafficking and corruption.
Grand jury to probe power price gouging
June 14, 2001
California’s state attorney general said Wednesday that he will ask a grand jury to investigate whether wholesale electricity suppliers illegally manipulated prices during the state’s power crisis.
Blackout forecasts shaky
June 14, 2001
In May, Gov. Gray Davis announced a plan to give Californians detailed warnings of rolling blackouts to help businesses and residents plan for outages. But a draft of the plan, obtained by The Associated Press, has changed the proposed one-hour “blackout warnings” to less certain “probability forecasts” that people familiar with the policy say could be wrong two-thirds of the time.
Jerry Atwood
June 14, 2001
Advocate: Homeless situation improving
June 14, 2001
By Matt Merkel-Hess Jerry Nyhoff knows the difficulties of being homeless of his 15 years in Lawrence, he’s spent the last four years on the streets. Nyhoff lost his job and then his home after suffering a work-related back injury.
BIA nominee eyes trust funds fixes
June 14, 2001
A federally run trust fund for American Indians that was mismanaged for more than a century can be fixed within four years, President Bush’s nominee to head the Bureau of Indian Affairs said Wednesday.
Eudorans have high-flying plans
Residents asking every house to display flag
June 14, 2001
By Joy Ludwig Eudora residents Joy Clouse and Rex Burkhardt think their idea to have every house fly a U.S. flag is just starting to catch on. Though houses without flags in Eudora still outnumber those with them, Clouse said more people have put their flags out since Memorial Day, when they kicked off their mission.
Western to conduct meeting in Joplin
June 14, 2001
By Scott Rothschild Western Resources Inc. said Wednesday it would conduct its annual shareholders meeting next month near Joplin, Mo., where a new power plant that the company co-owns soon will be operating.
Kraft shares close up
Philip Morris division has trading debut
June 14, 2001
Shares of Philip Morris Cos.’ Kraft Foods division, spun off in an $8.7 billion initial public offering that was the second-biggest ever in the United States, closed up less than 1 percent Wednesday after their trading debut.
Texas custom cutters to be cleaned
June 14, 2001
As wheat harvest moved into high gear in southern Kansas, fears over the possible spread of Karnal bunt into Kansas has cast a pall over what has so far been a good early harvest. Kansas Department of Agriculture plans to certify equipment for custom harvesters coming into Kansas from quarantined areas in Texas.
Earnings worries prompt sell-off
June 14, 2001
Wall Street’s mood soured Wednesday as a series of profit warnings intensified the market’s fears about weak earnings extending into 2002. Blue chip and technology stocks tumbled in a sell-off that accelerated as the session wore on.
Economy flirts with recession
Retail sales up slightly as consumers tighten spending
June 14, 2001
Consumers, who spent with abandon in April, put away their pocketbooks in May as economic activity remained weak in much of the country.
Oread leftovers hit auction block
Pharmaceutical firm sells more than 3,000 items, including domain name
June 14, 2001
By Mark Fagan What’s in a name? About $300. That’s what a bidder paid for Oread Inc.’s Internet domain name www.oread.com to lead off an auction of more than 3,000 pieces of the bankrupt pharmaceutical company’s equipment and furniture.
Free State names assistant coaches
June 14, 2001
Free State High has filled three assistant coaching slots. Adam Green, an all-stater from Lawrence High in 1991, will join the football staff. Nathan Olds will assist with boys soccer and Chuck Law has joined the girls soccer staff. Law already assists with boys soccer.
Raiders win fifth straight game
June 14, 2001
Left-handed pitcher Eric Peterson tossed a complete game as Lawrence’s Raiders beat Topeka Post 400, 6-3, in American Legion baseball on Wednesday night. Peterson struck out seven and did not walk a batter. He did hit one batter while scattering seven hits and improving to 3-1 on the season.
Search committee demands secrecy
June 14, 2001
Lips were sealed for the most part after Kansas University’s latest search committee meeting with representatives of headhunting firm Heidrick and Struggles Inc. Members of the Atlanta, Ga., based firm presented KU’s athletics director search committee with a list of potential candidates on Wednesday.
Additional needs
June 14, 2001
Worker thanks
June 14, 2001
Column objection
June 14, 2001
Arts Notes
June 14, 2001
Exhibit examines reformers in Kansas Country singers gather for festival Swedish celebration kicks off Friday Shakespeare fest opens Tuesday
Lott exit as leader lacks class
June 14, 2001
By Robert Reno Newsday One of Trent Lott’s last acts as majority leader was to issue a statement so graceless as to suggest that he had lost more than the leadership of the Senate including his reason and sportsmanship, maybe even his magnolia-scented charm.
What Are You Reading?
June 14, 2001
The China syndrome
June 14, 2001
By Teresa Livengood Ha Jin’s “The Bridegroom: Stories” beautifully explores matters of tyranny in contemporary China, set against the powers of capitalist America. These 12 stories capture daily struggles of Chinese people torn between matters of self and society.
A Kubrickian odyssey
Restored prints of Kubrick classics to be featured at KC festival
June 14, 2001
By Dan Lybarger The year 2001 has turned out a bit differently than envisioned in the 1968 movie “2001: A Space Odyssey.” We may not have regular passenger flights to the moon, but this year is shaping up to be a banner period for the film’s director Stanley Kubrick, who died in 1999 at the age of 70. A project he had been developing for years, “A.I.,” will finally make it to theaters this summer under the direction of Steven Spielberg. Many of his previous films have just received a much-needed $3 million restoration. All of the films that Kubrick made at Warner Bros. have been restored for a new boxed set of DVDs that hits the marketplace this Tuesday. And two of the restored films, “Lolita” and “A Clockwork Orange,” will play at Kansas City’s Halfway to Hollywood Film Festival.
Hurray for Hollywood
Halfway to Hollywood Film Festival highlights sci-fi and overlooked gems
June 14, 2001
By Dan Lybarger To get a feeling of what the Halfway to Hollywood Film Festival is like, it’s useful to know a little bit about its organizers. When contacted for this story, festival president Dr. Benjamin Meade had just finished running a half marathon, wrapping up another year of teaching at Avila College and constantly fielding calls on his cell phone. Brian Mossman, the vice president, is managing three movie theaters in the Fine Arts Group (The Fine Arts in Mission, The Englewood in Independence, Mo., and the Rio in Overland Park) while making arrangements to open a fourth and working on a weekly radio show. The two are alternating between a Mexican dinner and last-minute schedule changes.
City warns of difficult budget decisions ahead
June 14, 2001
By Joel Mathis Lawrence city commissioners say they face tough choices about priorities for the 2002 budget. Just not now. During a study session Wednesday morning at city hall, commissioners said they liked the priorities represented in nearly every budget proposal for outside agencies and city departments, but warned they’ll have to whittle away at the requests at a future date.
Nation Briefs
June 14, 2001
PHOENIX: Postal depository reports theft NEW YORK CITY: Mob boss Gotti near death from cancer Illinois: Murder trial opens for 38-year-old death
Nation Briefs
June 14, 2001
NEW YORK CITY: Workers’ comp pays murder convict Texas: Multiple murderer put to death
Nation Briefs
June 14, 2001
NEW YORK city: French sued for WWII actions New Jersey: Teen dies after sand collapse West Virginia: Wal-Mart OKs voucher plan NEW YORK CITY: Strip search case settled
Nation Briefs
June 14, 2001
New York City: West Nile virus expected to spread WASHINGTON, D.C.: Underground fire closes neighborhood Indiana: Wrong-way driver given 215 years in prison
Violent crime drops maybe
June 14, 2001
Is crime going up or down in America? It seems even the experts can’t quite agree. Just two weeks after FBI data signaled an end to a decade-long freefall in national crime rates, a conflicting study from a sister agency in the Justice Department concluded Wednesday that violent crime plummeted a record 15 percent last year.
Court ruling doesn’t stop smokers
June 14, 2001
In the month since the U.S. Supreme Court said it’s illegal to sell or possess marijuana for medical use, the decision appears to be having little effect in the eight states with medical marijuana laws.
Blue’s Clues’ fetches rapturous reviews
June 14, 2001
By Jan Biles Imagine a rock concert with an audience of 3-year-olds. That was the scene Wednesday morning at “Blue’s Clues Live!,” an energetic Broadway-style musical aimed at preschoolers and their fun-loving parents.
Shaky Mideast cease-fire holding
June 14, 2001
The clock had barely started ticking Wednesday on a fragile U.S.-brokered truce between Israel and the Palestinians when it was threatened by shooting incidents and naysaying from both sides.
Daily commitment is asking too much of neighbor
June 14, 2001
Jackson, Strait big winners at country awards
June 14, 2001
An absent George Strait was named the top entertainer in country music on Wednesday and shared three fan-voted awards with Alan Jackson for their duet “Murder on Music Row.”
Bush adviser financial ties questioned
June 14, 2001
President Bush’s top strategist, who owned more than $100,000 of Intel stock, met in March with the company’s chief executive and two lobbyists as they pushed for federal approval of a corporate merger. The administration approved the deal less than two months later.
Business Briefcase
June 14, 2001
Russell Stover prepares for Lawrence store Earnings: Maytag lowers expectations on weak retail market Bausch & Lomb lowers second quarter prediction EconomyL Weak market causes Georgia-Pacific to cut jobs Polaroid cuts jobs, warns of earnings Technology: Oracle to announce new software today Japan: Amazon expands business to music Manipulation charges: Stan Lee Media co-founder indicted
Wake Up Call: Increasing the peace?
Nicaragua excursion generates thoughts about Peace Corps
June 14, 2001
By Greg Douros Editor’s note: Mag columnist Greg Douros is spending the summer in Nicaragua doing research to complete his master’s degree in sociology.
Banned in the U.S.A.
David Ollington’s controversial P.O.W. play ‘Resistance’ meets up with resistance
June 14, 2001
By Mitchell J. Near David Ollington planned for his first full-length play to be a rather quiet affair. It would debut inauspiciously at a Kansas City coffee house, with only a two-person cast, and it would explore the brutality which is inflicted upon a man as a way to toughen him up and make him a superior soldier. In the process, the lead character would undergo a value check, as the torture forces him to examine what’s really important in his life.
Playing the shell game
Chicago band Tortoise takes the slow, patient route to the top
June 14, 2001
By Geoff Harkness Tortoise is one of the more appropriately named bands in modern music. It’s a word that nicely describes the group’s leisurely ambient dreamscapes as well as its unhurried approach to achieving success.
Mike Finnigan, Percy Sledge bring soul to Salina
June 14, 2001
By Dave Ranney In a roundabout way, last winter’s soaring energy prices are luring Mike Finnigan back to Kansas for a one-of-a-kind Saturday appearance with soul master Percy “When a Man Loves a Woman” Sledge.
Knot’s scary farm
Des Moines horror-metal machine Slipknot avoids the mainstream noose
June 14, 2001
By Geoff Harkness Though the world’s scariest drummer still lives with his parents, Joey #1 is happy to be home.
The Mag: Food box
June 14, 2001
What: Lawrence Pizza Company Where: 601 Kasold Drive; 749-2277
The Mag: Top Music
June 14, 2001
Singles 1. “Lady Marmalade,” Christina Aguilera, Lil’ Kim, Mya & Pink
New Diana biography reveals royal trysts
June 14, 2001
Just days before she married Prince Charles, young Diana Spencer confronted her rival, Camilla Parker Bowles, at a London restaurant called, aptly, Menage a Trois.
Friends and neighbors
June 14, 2001
Can anyone tame Tiger?
June 14, 2001
When Nick Faldo was at the top of his game, he met Ben Hogan and asked the four-time champion the secret to winning a U.S. Open. “Shoot the lowest score,” Hogan replied. It no longer seems that simple with Tiger Woods around.
Bush softens resistance to missile defense
June 14, 2001
President Bush said Wednesday that nervous NATO leaders were warming to his missile defense plans but suggested the United States would pursue a high-tech shield with or without Europe’s blessing. “I’m intent upon doing what I think is the right thing,” he said.
County agrees on annexation
June 14, 2001
By Joy Ludwig An area about 10 times the size of Prairie Park may soon be a part of Lawrence’s city limits. Douglas County commissioners Wednesday agreed to start the annexation process for more than 700 acres along Sixth Street from Wakarusa Drive to the South Lawrence Trafficway.
State Briefs
June 14, 2001
Washington, D.C.: Bush to nominate Kansas judge Topeka: Consumers warned about new federal law VALLEY FALLS: 7-year-old seeks help after traffic accident WICHITA: Ex-superintendent faces misuse-of-funds charge
Daily Ticker
June 14, 2001
Leaders show clear direction
June 14, 2001
By Jim Hoagland Washington Post Writers Group Britain’s Tony Blair, Iran’s Mohammad Khatami and Italy’s Silvio Berlusconi swept to electoral victories in a trifecta of campaigning this spring. The voters showed faith in Blair, hope for Khatami and charity toward Berlusconi.
Ruling is bow to the past
June 14, 2001
By Cal Thomas Tribune Media Services School superintendent J.J. Phillips believed certain ideas were so important that he compiled a little book for his students to memorize between the first and eighth grades.
Movie listngs
June 14, 2001
Calendar
June 14, 2001
Briefly
June 14, 2001
City’s chief building inspector retires Several dozen city officials turned out Wednesday to celebrate the impending retirement of Gene Shaughnessy, the city’s chief building inspector. Shaughnessy, who joined the city staff as a rehabilitation specialist in 1976, has inspected thousands of commercial, residential, industrial, school-construction and remodeling projects for the city. He said the biggest change during his tenure was “growth and workload.” “It’s just overwhelmed us the last couple of years to keep up with everything,” he said. “We’ve tripled the inspectors, but we’ve quadrupled the workload.” His last day with the city is Monday. After that, he goes to work as an inspector for telecommunications giant Sprint. “The only trouble,” he said, “is I’m starting Tuesday.” Shaughnessy, above center, shows off a sprinkler given to him by Jim McSwain, chief of Lawrence-Douglas County Fire & Medical, as Bobbie Walthall, left, and Karin Rexroad, both city employees, listen to a story about sprinkler inspections. __________________________ Investigation: Victim identified as Lawrence resident Ottawa The homicide victim found Monday in northwest Franklin County has been identified as Barney Riley, 39, Lawrence. On Wednesday, officers took into custody a 44-year-old man from rural Overbrook in connection with the death. He is being held at the Franklin County Adult Detention Center, pending filing of formal charges. Riley’s body was found shortly before 2 p.m. Monday at an abandoned farm by children riding their bikes in the 1600 block of Shawnee Road. The regional Major Case Squad, which involves officers from Douglas, Shawnee and Jefferson counties, was brought in to investigate the death, which authorities considered suspicious. No additional information was available late Wednesday. __________________________ State committee: Professor reappointed to Hispanic affairs panel Debora Ortega of Lawrence has been reappointed by Gov. Bill Graves to the Kansas Advisory Committee on Hispanic Affairs. Ortega is a licensed clinical social worker and an acting assistant professor of social welfare at Kansas University. She was reappointed to a term that will expire in June 2003. The committee assists the state and private organizations in providing services to Hispanic Kansans. New members appointed to the board were James Terrones of Olathe and Raquel Guzman-Vargas of Manhattan. Also reappointed were Guillermina Burley of Great Bend, Robert DeLeon of Garden City, Jaime Lopez of Wichita and Cristina Palacioz of Hutchinson. __________________________ Gasoline prices: Pump patrol at work The Journal-World has found a Lawrence-area gasoline price as low as: $1.459 a gallon at Conoco at Sixth and Crestline, and Citgo, Ninth and Iowa. If you find a lower price, please call us at 832-7154. Be prepared to leave the name of the business, the address and the price. Or go to www.ljworld.com /section/gasoline to join our Pump Patrol message board with your gas price information.
People
June 14, 2001
On the record
June 14, 2001
Horoscopews
June 14, 2001
Military studies quality-of-life issues
June 14, 2001
A new study suggests 64 ways to improve life for people in the military, from higher pay to better moving companies. Along with pay, housing and workplace conditions are among the highest priorities, Navy Adm. David Jeremiah, who led the study, told reporters Wednesday at the Pentagon.
Board settles ‘suitable’ question
June 14, 2001
By Tim Carpenter The Kansas State Board of Education voted Wednesday to endorse a broad interpretation of the Kansas Constitution’s “suitable” public education mandate. Definition of that word is important to the financial well-being of Kansas public schools, because the Legislature is preparing to hire consultants for a study to determine the cost of educating Kansas’ 450,000 public school students.
Word of Mouth: Garden variety
Lawrence’s Imperial Garden provides Chinese food for the all-you-can-eat crowd
June 14, 2001
By Diane Frook Chinese culture has long been famed for its ancient traditions, but it’s increasingly becoming known for a more modern one: the dinner buffet. Along with Western Sizzlin’s and cafeterias, Chinese restaurants dominate the American pastime of all-you-can-eat.
Parting shot
June 14, 2001
Short Stuff
June 14, 2001
Take a safari at the K.C. Zoo FSHS journalist goes to Washington Watch out for hidden sugar
The men from ‘Atlantis’
The team behind Disney’s newest animated flick deal with the baggage attached to the studio name
June 14, 2001
By Loey Lockerby “We’ve made a couple of movies that take place in Fantasyland. Let’s turn left at the end of Main Street and make a movie that takes place in Adventureland.”
Film Review - ‘Atlantis: The Lost Empire’
June 14, 2001
By Loey Lockerby For decades, virtually all of Disney’s animated features have followed the same formula: A young misfit, longing for a better life, goes through various trials before finally emerging as a true hero. When it works, this formula produces classics that speak to the hopes and dreams of the child in everyone. When it fails, it produces bland retreads that make “Pokn” look like “Toy Story.”
Out of Bounds: Scoring a Royals feast
June 14, 2001
By Seth Jones I hate it when people tell me I can’t do something. In a casual conversation the other day, I revealed to someone that I was looking forward to catching a Royals game soon, and that I would write a column about it.
Stringfield returning to ‘ER
June 14, 2001
Last spring, NBC treated its audience to an “encore” of the 1994 pilot episode of “ER” (9 p.m., NBC). Viewers were not fooled by the glorified repeat. But longtime “ER” fans may welcome the return of Sherry Stringfield and her character to the staff of County General.
Planner seeks end to appearance of impropriety
June 14, 2001
By Joel Mathis Andy Ramirez knows what many people think about planning commissioners. And he doesn’t like it. “Right now,” he said Wednesday, “the public perceives us as being a tool of the developers.” Ramirez, a member of the Lawrence-Douglas County Planning Commission, says that perception is unfair.
Veto kills ‘watchdog’ group
Governor nixes committee that oversees social services
June 14, 2001
By Dave Ranney A legislative committee charged with overseeing the state Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services is no more. In a little-publicized May 21 veto, Gov. Bill Graves pulled the plug on the 12-member SRS Oversight Committee.
Presidency not business as usual
June 14, 2001
By Geneva Overholser Washington Post Writers Group George W. Bush, you’ll recall, was going to be our CEO president. This would be a crisp, straight-ahead presidency, eye on the ball, no fuzzy math and no pollsters visible. “This president,” emphasized his chief of staff, “is the first ever to have an MBA.”
Significant role
June 14, 2001
Journal-World Editorial The Midwest Research Institute is an important, but little-known, part of an important life sciences effort. One of the least known but most important parts of the current “Life Sciences” effort in Kansas City is the Midwest Research Institute.
KU buys Oread buildings
June 14, 2001
By Mark Fagan The Lawrence laboratories of a former contract-pharmaceutical powerhouse are going back to their roots. The KU Center for Research Inc., which is Kansas University’s research-administration arm, paid $3.6 million this week for lab and office buildings at 1501 Wakarusa Drive. The space will be used for biomedical research, starting with a cancer-fighting project financed by a $9.9 million grant.
Xena, Warrior Princess,’ gets the X
Show leaves syndication airwaves after six seasons
June 14, 2001
A character on Showtime’s “The Chris Isaak Show” is fretting about how odd his Russian girlfriend’s family seems. When another character tells him he has xenophobia, he grows more disturbed. What’s that mean, he asks.
CD REVIEWS
June 14, 2001