Archive for Wednesday, June 6, 2001

All stories

Judge refuses to delay McVeigh’s execution
June 6, 2001
(Web Posted Wednesday at 5:19 p.m.) A judge denied Timothy McVeigh a further stay of execution Wednesday, saying nothing in newly disclosed FBI documents could change the fact that he was the “instrument of death and destruction” in the Oklahoma City bombing.
Jarrett still ahead on points, but Gordon still richer
June 6, 2001
Dale Jarrett has ever so slightly stretched his slim lead over Jeff Gordon in the points standings with a 50 point edge. However, Gordon is still way out in fron on the money list.
6Sports report: Free State soccer holds camp
June 6, 2001
Firebird boys soccer coach Jason Pendleton will be hard pressed to replace departing scoring leader Todd Trahan. But why is he holding Free State’s soccer camp so early this year? Ask his wife.
Lakers ready to rumble
Los Angeles seeks sweep for spot in record books
June 6, 2001
Kobe Bryant went to a movie the other day, opting to see “Pearl Harbor” rather than watch Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals.
Rainy start to summer school
June 6, 2001
Summer classes are in session at Kansas University, even if summerlike weather isn’t. Tuesday, on the first day of the summer session, Eva Tilford, a KU junior from Kansas City, Kan., right, waits in the rain for a bus outside Snow Hall at KU. The woman at left was not identified.
American League Roundup: Blue Jays bash Devil Rays
Tampa Bay drops sixth straight
June 6, 2001
Police in Austin agree: 911 call to report underage drinking unusual
June 6, 2001
A restaurant staff didn’t follow normal procedure when a 911 call was placed after President Bush’s 19-year-old twin daughters were suspected of violating underage drinking laws, the owners said Tuesday.
Panel’s report on Fla. vote disputed
June 6, 2001
The two Republican-appointed members of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights objected Tuesday to a draft report that accuses Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Secretary of State Katherine Harris of allowing unequal treatment of the state’s minority voters during last November’s presidential election.
Vaccines ordered against Ohio meningitis cases
June 6, 2001
The state Health Department decided Tuesday to vaccinate up to 5,800 high school students to protect them from a meningitis-related outbreak that has killed two teen-agers and left a third seriously ill.
Philippine hostages safe, kidnappers maintain
June 6, 2001
A leader of a band of Muslim extremists who seized 20 hostages including three Americans from a posh resort told a radio station Wednesday that the captives were alive and talks with the government have begun.
Complete map of the sky planned
June 6, 2001
In an era of stunning new maps of the canyons of Mars, the rugged terrain of the ocean bottom and the intricate human genome an international team of astronomers is undertaking the most ambitious map-making project yet: They are surveying the sky.
Friends and neighbors
June 6, 2001
Nation & World Briefs
June 6, 2001
HOUSTON: Tropical storm drenches coast SAN FRANCISCO: Court allows Ruby Ridge case WASHINGTON, D.C.: Airline merger plan shaky Philippines: U.S. sailor missing after clash
Pentagon auditors caught faking documents
June 6, 2001
The Pentagon agency charged with exposing fraud destroyed documents and replaced them with fakes to avoid embarrassment when its own operations were audited, an internal inquiry found.
AIDS pandemic still in early stages
June 6, 2001
Though more than 22 million people have died of AIDS and 36 million others are infected with HIV, the pandemic is still in its early stages, the United Nations’ top AIDS fighter said Tuesday as he marked 20 years since the first official report of AIDS.
Contenders battle in LA mayor’s race
June 6, 2001
City Attorney James Hahn was battling Antonio Villaraigosa, a former state legislator, in a race Tuesday night to become mayor of the nation’s second-largest city. With 3 percent of precincts reporting, Hahn had 65,497 votes, or 62 percent. Villaraigosa, hoping to become Los Angeles’ first Hispanic mayor since 1872, had 39,387 votes, or 38 percent.
Fake critic’s rave reviews puzzles Sony Pictures
June 6, 2001
The revelation that Sony Pictures promoted several movies with accolades from a critic who didn’t exist raises the question: Why would the studio even bother? “That’s the question we’ve got, too,” Sony spokeswoman Susan Tick said Monday, adding that an investigation was under way into who generated quotes from the phony “David Manning of The Ridgefield Press.”
Cruise challenges gay rumors
June 6, 2001
Tom Cruise has filed a $100 million defamation lawsuit against a man who allegedly offered to sell videotapes of himself having sex with the actor. It’s the second lawsuit Cruise has filed in the past month, challenging rumors that he is gay.
Nuclear cargo on track for city
Train carrying radioactive waste from New York to head through Lawrence
June 6, 2001
By Scott Rothschild Sometime this summer, about 45 tons of highly radioactive cargo will be hauled by train through northeastern Kansas, and right through Lawrence, officials said Tuesday. The shipment is from western New York, where the U.S. Department of Energy is shutting down and cleaning up the country’s first commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The cost of the cleanup is pegged at $1.6 billion.
Daschle, Democrats take over Senate today
June 6, 2001
As lights went out in the Senate Tuesday evening, the darkness signaled the end of an era for the Republicans and a new dawn for Democrats who took control of the Senate for the first time since 1994.
Residents want SEK counties in same district
Redistricting efforts shouldn’t split nine-county region, panel told
June 6, 2001
Residents urged legislators to put Montgomery County back in the same congressional district with the rest of southeast Kansas. The occasion was a public hearing Tuesday, held by legislators who have the task of redrawing the state’s four congressional, 40 state Senate, 125 state House and 10 State Board of Education districts, using 2000 census figures.
UMKC loses 6th dean in the last year
Chancellor says new leadership needed in School of Biological Sciences
June 6, 2001
The dean for biological sciences at the University of Missouri-Kansas City has been fired, making him the sixth dean to leave since Chancellor Martha Gilliland arrived at the school a little over a year ago. Marino Martinez-Carrion is credited with attracting respected researchers and millions of dollars in grants to the School of Biological Sciences since it opened in 1985.
Devils’ Arnott may not play on Thursday
June 6, 2001
Jason Arnott’s playing status didn’t become any clearer on the first of two off days before Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals.
Cancer rates in U.S. show promising trend, experts say
June 6, 2001
Rates for cancer cases and deaths went down in the 1990s, led by declines for prostate, lung and colon cancer, according to combined government and private studies. More breast cancer cases were detected, apparently because of aggressive screening.
Handcuffs don’t deter police car hijacker
June 6, 2001
A suspected car thief handcuffed in the back seat of a Wichita Police car apparently squeezed through a divider separating him from the front seat and stole the police cruiser.
Handling of AIDS money under scrutiny
June 6, 2001
City officials are investigating complaints about the way the Kansas City Health Department administers federal dollars to AIDS patients in 11 counties in Kansas and Missouri.
Radio Margaritaville’ making waves
Internet music station anything but homogenized, Jimmy Buffett says
June 6, 2001
You can go to the island of St. Somewhere. St. Anywhere. Just boot up your PC, make a drink, put on your headphones and close your eyes.
House buys adjustable lectern
New setup will accommodate shorter and wheelchair-bound legislators
June 6, 2001
In past years, speeches in the Kansas House of Representatives began with a metallic crunch, the sound of members moving the microphones closer from the lectern down front. Next year, speeches could begin with the muffled drone of a small electric motor. The House has a new lectern and members can adjust its height to suit theirs.
Dorothy Beatty
June 6, 2001
Virgil Shelton
June 6, 2001
Ethel Smith
June 6, 2001
Harassment alive in U.S. schools, survey finds
June 6, 2001
By Tim Carpenter Sexual harassment of junior high and high school students is pervasive in the nation’s public schools, a new national survey says. Four of five students in eighth through 11th grades surveyed by the American Association of University Women Educational Foundation have personally experienced bullying, teasing and touching entailed in sexual harassment.
Area briefs
June 6, 2001
Cause ‘undetermined’ in rural house fire Two hospitalized after 3-car accident MS Walk breaks record again
Electric alliance loses power
Topeka changes stance, may endorse $70 million rate increase for Western
June 6, 2001
By Joel Mathis Lawrence and Douglas County officials were angered Tuesday by news that Topeka is negotiating a deal with Western Resources Inc. to endorse an electric rate increase. After all, the city in February gave Topeka $17,500 for a legal fight against a rate increase. The county kicked in another $5,000. And Lawrence-area officials never heard about any changes of heart by Topeka officials.
On the record
June 6, 2001
Public’s budget concerns voiced in city meeting
Environment, lower taxes among topics discussed
June 6, 2001
By Joel Mathis Environmental planning. A youth hostel. Moving the farmer’s market. And, of course, lower taxes. Those were the top items advocated Tuesday night as members of the public were invited to tell the Lawrence City Commission what they want to see in the 2002 city budget. The commission has started work on the 2002 budget; the city manager’s budget recommendation is due at the end of this month.
Habitat forecloses on home
June 6, 2001
By Dave Ranney For the first time in its 12-year history, Lawrence Habitat for Humanity has taken back one of its houses. “There were some extenuating circumstances, but, basically, the family was unable to make their payments,” said Androllaert, executive director at Habitat for Humanity. Bollaert said Habitat for Humanity took back the three-bedroom house last week. He declined to identify the family a mother and three children or provide the address.
Threat of flooding engulfs area
National Weather Service says concerns to remain until Friday
June 6, 2001
By Mike Belt Several rural Leavenworth County roads were underwater Tuesday as Stranger Creek overflowed its banks. In Douglas County and other surrounding counties, flood concerns were eased at least for the day because of a respite from the heavy downpours of Sunday and Monday. But the flood threat is not over another round of rain came late Tuesday and will remain a concern for the area at least until Friday, the National Weather Service in Topeka said.
City Commission Briefs
June 6, 2001
Residents oppose Burress rejection Higher ruling sought on plumbing codes Payment approved to complete house move
State Briefs
June 6, 2001
WICHITA: Topeka hospital settles Medicare claim Mission: Former employee sues city, mayor
Wichita’s riverfront receiving facelift
June 6, 2001
Local officials, pleased by the crowds drawn to the city’s newest tourist attraction, are planning to make the riverfront area near Exploration Place more attractive to those visitors. By the end of June, officials expect to see the final plans for an $8.3 million facelift of the Arkansas River front near the new museum and the Keeper of the Plains statue.
Indy Racing League heads to Texas
IRL confident problems that plagued CART not factor
June 6, 2001
While their cars look strikingly similar, the Indy Racing League will be able to do something that CART couldn’t race at Texas Motor Speedway. Six weeks after CART canceled a race over concerns about driver safety on the 1 1/2-mile, high-banked track, the IRL has no such fears as it prepares for the Casino Magic 500 on Saturday night.
Familiar names like Garciaparra plentiful in amateur draft
June 6, 2001
The Seattle Mariners saw a familiar name on the draft board and couldn’t pass him up. The Mariners drafted Michael Garciaparra, brother of Boston’s Nomar Garciaparra, with the 36th pick in Tuesday’s baseball draft. He was one of a handful of players with famous bloodlines selected on the draft’s first day.
KU pitcher Smart gets academic honor
June 6, 2001
Kansas University pitcher Pete Smart has been named to the second team of the Academic All-America college baseball team. Smart, a left-hander who has signed a free-agent contract with the Milwaukee Brewers, was one of three Big 12 players chosen to the three teams.
Big 12 leaders pass academic measure
June 6, 2001
Big 12 Conference directors on Tuesday approved a proposal to require athletes to have passing grades in at least six hours of classes in the preceding semester to be eligible for postseason play.
Task force eyeing green spaces
ECO2 discusses idea of purchasing open areas for community
June 6, 2001
By Joy Ludwig An idea to preserve Douglas County’s agricultural land, grassy areas and wide open spaces is in the works. Members of ECO2, a Lawrence Chamber of Commerce task force designated to look for open and commercial spaces, discussed developing a master plan to do just that Tuesday. The plan to acquire land probably would require a public bond issue or other taxing authority measure, said County Commissioner Charles Jones, who also serves on the task force.
Jayhawks Nelson, Lantz drafted
June 6, 2001
Kansas University senior shortstop John Nelson and KU junior pitcher Doug Lantz were drafted during the first day of the amateur baseball draft on Tuesday. Nelson went in the eighth round, 254th overall, to the St. Louis Cardinals, while Lantz went in the 14th round to the Cleveland Indians.
Royals swap Santiago, Byrd
June 6, 2001
The Kansas City Royals traded right-hander Jose Santiago to Philadelphia for right-hander Paul Byrd on Tuesday. Byrd was 0-1 with an 8.10 ERA for the Phillies. He is 29-29 with a 4.70 ERA in eight major league seasons with the New York Mets, Atlanta and Philadelphia.
Marvel comic book heads to the big screen
June 6, 2001
Another Marvel comic book is on its way to the big screen. Dimension Films has acquired the rights to create an adaptation of “Cloak and Dagger,” which Marvel debuted in July 1985.
Wealthy tribe gives $10 million to museum
June 6, 2001
A Connecticut Indian tribe made rich by a casino gave $10 million toward the National Museum of the American Indian, a project that after 12 years still is $90 million and three years away from completion.
FBI director urged to postpone retirement
June 6, 2001
Associates of FBI Director Louis Freeh are urging him to postpone his upcoming retirement for a few months to help the agency ride out the turmoil caused by its miscues involving Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh and accused spy Robert Philip Hanssen.
Barbecue teams take honors in McLouth
June 6, 2001
Several barbecue aficionados from Lawrence and area towns won awards in Saturday’s Northeast Kansas State Championships at the McLouth BBQ Blowout in McLouth. Curtis Oroke and Bruce Lopez, both of Lawrence, took top honors in the miscellaneous category.
Survey: Convenience key
June 6, 2001
The latest findings come as no surprise: Time-pressed Americans continue to seek convenient meal solutions. They’re using more home-delivery services and buying more takeout food. While they’re not eating out as much, 67 percent still consume their main meal out of the home at least once a week.
Rodman’s name dropped in strip-club trial
June 6, 2001
A former manager of Atlanta’s hottest strip club dropped more names of famous athletes Tuesday, testifying that his boss arranged for dancers to have sex with Dennis Rodman and 1998 NFL MVP Terrell Davis.
Royals draft high school fireballer
June 6, 2001
For the sixth time in four years, the Kansas City Royals have spent a first-round draft pick on a pitcher. Now they’ll cross their fingers and hope Colt Griffin, an 18-year-old fireballing Texas high school standout, will change their luck.
76ers coach Brown left legacy at Kansas
June 6, 2001
By Gary Bedore Those who know Larry Brown can’t help but like Larry Brown. There’s something about the soft-spoken, well traveled Philadelphia 76ers basketball coach that throughout the years has charmed fans and grizzled media-types alike. Maybe it’s Brown’s puppy-dog eyes, wry smile and dry wit.
Can’t top ‘Jayni’s‘ pizza party
June 6, 2001
Pete Wiklund will bring his pie-making skills to “Jayni’s Kitchen” this week. During “The Pizza Party,” host Jayni Carey and Wiklund will prepare several pizzas using the basic dough recipe below.
Manufacturers show off what’s new in food
June 6, 2001
What’s new in food, set out in colorful variety, vied for the attention of visitors to the Food Marketing Institute’s recent show. There were also forecasts of new ways of shopping. The annual meeting drew 35,000 food manufacturers and retail buyers from throughout the world to Chicago.
Links to flavor
Sausage heats up outdoor dining
June 6, 2001
Americans now light up their backyard grills more than 1 billion times a year, according to industry statistics. They are most likely to cook steak, hamburger, chicken or ribs. But back in the pack, coming on strong, is sausage. This food category defined as ground and seasoned meat stuffed into a casing excluding hot dogs ranks 12th among food grilled most frequently by “average Americans.”
Daily Ticker
June 6, 2001
Napster nears deal with record labels
June 6, 2001
In a deal that could legitimize Napster, the outlaw song-sharing service is close to signing a deal with three major record labels to participate in a new music subscription service this summer, industry sources said Tuesday.
UMKC selects Zvosec
Roos promote assistant basketball coach to replace Demopoulos
June 6, 2001
Rich Zvosec was hired Tuesday as Missouri-Kansas City’s third coach in as many years. The 40-year-old Zvosec, an assistant to Dean Demopoulos last year, signed a four-year contract through the 2004-2005 season. He was promoted when Demopoulous left the Kangaroos after one season to join the staff of the Seattle Supersonics.
American Italian
June 6, 2001
Borden Foods will sell some of its pasta brands to American Italian Pasta Co. for $67.5 million. The sale does not include many of Borden’s best-known products.
What to do to receive compensation
June 6, 2001
Blockbuster is proposing that customers who paid “extended view” fees between Jan. 1, 1992, and April 1, 2001, would be eligible to receive discount certificates from the company.
Blockbuster offers to settle late-fee cases
Video-, game-rental powerhouse seeks to issue discounts, coupons to late-paying customers since 1992
June 6, 2001
Blockbuster Inc. is proposing to issue millions of coupons for free video rentals to settle 23 class-action lawsuits accusing the company of charging exorbitant late fees. In court documents, the world’s largest video rental chain said the face value of the coupons would be about $460 million.
OPEC retains oil level
Ministers to meet again in July
June 6, 2001
OPEC members formally agreed Tuesday to keep pumping oil at their current levels and to meet again in July to assess the effect of Iraq’s suspension of its crude exports. Delegates from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries announced the unanimous decision at the cartel’s headquarters in Vienna.
Old home town - 25, 40 and 100 years ago today
June 6, 2001
Coach support
June 6, 2001
Mayor fumbles
June 6, 2001
Building citizenship
June 6, 2001
Journal-World Editorial The Girls State program strives to convince its participants of the importance of being involved in their government.
Diplomatic ‘two-fer’
June 6, 2001
Journal-World Editorial By appointing former Sen. Howard Baker as ambassador to Japan, President Bush will get a second able envoy.
Miami signs ex-Jayhawk Lies
June 6, 2001
The Miami Dolphins signed former Kansas University offensive tackle Mike Lies on Tuesday. Lies, who played with the XFL’s Birmingham Bolts this year, was released by Carolina in 1999 and Dallas last year before the Chicago Bears signed him to the practice squad in December.
Divisive labels
June 6, 2001
Nation Briefs
June 6, 2001
OKLAHOMA CITY: OKC bomb conspirator’s court hearing delayed California: Conservation drops power usage by 11% Illinois: Police kill suspect after 14-hour standoff WASHINGTON, D.C.: Swing set recalled for safety hazard
Nation Briefs
June 6, 2001
Michigan: Ex-husband kills former wife, self NEW YORK CITY: Hotel queen sued for gay discrimination WASHINGTON, D.C.: Animal activist faces severe scrubbing threat
Nation Briefs
June 6, 2001
Utah: Father of frozen tot pleads in boy’s death WASHINGTON, D.C.: Postal Service quarterly losses top $166 million Florida: Army colonel on trial for Soviet espionage NEW YORK CITY: Embassy bombing jury considers death penalty
Income gap rudely widens
June 6, 2001
By Robert Reno Newsday People who belch at the table, eat off their knives, or rich ones who discuss their incomes with strangers are justly considered boorish louts.
6Sports report: pair of Jayhawks get drafted
June 6, 2001
Kevin Romary reports on the drafting of Jayhawk baseballers John Nelson and Doug Lantz. Shortstop Nelson was selected in the eighth round by St. Louis, while pitcher Lantz went in the 14th to Cleveland.
6Sports report: local entries fare well in Fourball tourney
June 6, 2001
Kevin Romary reports on day one of the KGA Fourball tournament. Kansas Jayhawk products Andy Stewart and Chris Marshall hold the early lead, but they are not the only local talent doing well.
Baseball briefs
June 6, 2001
Red Sox take chance on Cuban pitcher Ogea allows one run in minor league start Yankee prospect plays Guillen finishes rehab Indians recall Woodard
National League Roundup: Cubs hammer Cardinals
Zuleta slam powers Chicago past St. Louis, 12-6
June 6, 2001
Look out, Cardinals. These aren’t the same Chicago Cubs you abused in a sweep at St. Louis last month. Pinch-hitter Julio Zuleta hit a grand slam, and Matt Stairs and Rondell White had back-to-back homers as the Cubs beat the Cardinals 12-6 Tuesday night.
Nepal shooting timeline offered
June 6, 2001
It was a pleasant family gathering in Nepal’s royal palace, a soiree in a gardenside billiard room and adjoining parlor that King Birendra liked to host every Friday night. The king’s son, Crown Prince Dipendra, was tending bar. He mixed one of his cousins a drink, and the assembled relatives chatted as they waited for dinner. At about 9 p.m., Dipendra slipped out of the gathering.
Domestic violence cases addressed
Activists trying to craft response to aid victims
June 6, 2001
By Dave Ranney In Duluth, Minn., when a police officer responds to a domestic violence call, he’s accompanied by a social worker. The officer handles law-enforcement issues. The social worker, a woman, counsels the victim.
Briefly
June 6, 2001
City Band to begin season The Lawrence City Band will kick off its 2001 summer concert season at 8 p.m. today at South Park, 11th and Massachusetts streets. Conductor Bob Foster, shown above, will lead the band in a program that includes “Storm King” by Walter Finlayson; “Morning, Noon and Night in Vienna” overture by Franz von Suppe; “Italian Polka” by Rachmaninoff; “Richard Rodgers: A Symphonic Portrait” arranged by Frank Erickson; “Eagle Squadron” by Kenneth J. Alford; “That’s Entertainment” arranged by John Higgins; “Beguine” by Morton Gould; “Irving Berlin: A Symphonic Portrait” arranged by Hawley Ades; “The Irish Washerwoman” by Leroy Anderson; and “His Honor” by Henry Fillmore. The band will perform every Wednesday through July 25 at the William Kelly Bandstand in South Park. __________________________ University: Ringer to head KU theatre Delores Ringer, associate professor of theater at Kansas University, has been named the new director of University Theatre. She will begin her duties in early August. Ringer replaces Del Unruh, who served as director for seven years and will continue to teach theater at KU. Ringer will head the University Theatre staff, oversee its budget and teach one class a semester. For more on University Theatre’s new director, see Sunday’s Arts & Living section. __________________________ Crime: City phone system tapped by outside caller Lawrence City Hall fell victim to a phone scam this week. On Sunday, someone managed to gain access to City Hall’s phone system to make a series of international calls, according to Lawrence Police. The long distance bill for six calls totaled $953, a police report said. City officials were made aware of the calls by AT&T Global Security, said police spokesman Sgt. Mike Pattrick. AT&T called because the phone company thought it was unusual for such calls to be made from City Hall, he said. Neither Pattrick nor other City Hall officials would comment on specifics concerning the method used to make the calls. They would only say that the caller was able to access the phone system from a location other than City Hall. The city is working with AT&T in an investigation of the incident, said Ron Hall, city information systems director. __________________________ Police: False name brings trouble A motorist stopped by a Lawrence Police officer early Tuesday lied about his identity because he thought there was a warrant for his arrest. There was no warrant. But the 21-year-old Kansas City, Mo., man was cited for obstruction of justice. The officer stopped the car about 2:50 a.m. when he observed it being driven in an erratic manner near Sixth Street and Schwarz Road, said police spokesman Sgt. Mike Pattrick. After being questioned about his identity, the driver admitted he’d given a false name because he thought there was a warrant for his arrest in Kansas City, Pattrick said. __________________________ Gasoline prices: Pump patrol at work The Journal-World has found a Lawrence-area gasoline price as low as: $1.61.9 a gallon at Citgo at Ninth and Iowa streets. If you find a lower price, please call us at 832-7154. Be prepared to leave the name of the business, the address and the price. Or go to www.ljworld.com/section/gasoline to join our Pump Patrol message board with your gas price information.
Capriati bounces Serena in quarters
After shaky three-set victory, American sets sights on top-seeded Hingis
June 6, 2001
Serving one point from an elusive victory, Jennifer Capriati stared at the clay, trying to calm her nerves in the tense silence. She bounced the ball five times, then managed to put it in play.
Move over, Mensa: NBA put to test
June 6, 2001
By Chuck Woodling If you get on the Web and bring up the site of Mensa International, the society of super brains, you can take a test that will tell you if you might consider applying for membership in the organization.
Corrected date of anniversary upsets daughter
June 6, 2001
Horoscopes
June 6, 2001
Book raises copyright issues
June 6, 2001
By Mike Hoeflich Professor in the Kansas University School of Law Margaret Mitchell’s “Gone With the Wind” and the film it inspired starring Clark Gable have become one of the icons of modern American “pop” culture and history. The popularity of the book and the film continues more than a half century after they first appeared.
Gasoline prices: Pump patrol at work
June 6, 2001
The Journal-World has found a Lawrence-area gasoline price as low as: $1.61.9 a gallon at Citgo at Ninth and Iowa streets.
Bush builds support for Habitat
June 6, 2001
President Bush delivered a spirited defense Tuesday of his proposal to give government contracts to religious-based organizations that provide social services.
World Briefs
June 6, 2001
UNITED NATIONS: Scientist to chart planet’s health Costa Rica: Haiti election timetable approved Afghanistan: Taliban restrict foreigners’ habits Angola: Protective eyeglasses distributed for eclipse
Palestinian militants won’t observe cease-fire
June 6, 2001
Hamas cast doubt Tuesday on how long a fragile cease-fire can last when its spiritual leader said the militant group is not bound by Yasser Arafat’s call to end attacks on Israel. International pressure to keep the truce on track was growing, with CIA Director George Tenet expected to head to the region on Wednesday to promote Israeli-Palestinian security cooperation.
Dorothy Ray
June 6, 2001
Sausage Recipes
June 6, 2001
PGA Tour suffers lousy week
Casey Martin case not a ‘win-win’ situation as commissioner suggests
June 6, 2001
Tiger Woods and Karrie Webb could not have asked for a better week. One inflicted even more psychological damage on his so-called peers with a seven-stroke victory, the other claimed the toughest championship in women’s golf with equal ease. If only golf’s leading organizations could operate so smoothly.
PBS revives ‘Don Quixote’
June 6, 2001
There are some great classic movies from the 1970s. In that vein, “Great Performances” presents the 1973 film version of the ballet “Don Quixote” (7 p.m., PBS, check local listings) featuring dancing legend Rudolf Nureyev.
Host families sought
June 6, 2001
The Center for Cultural Interchange is seeking Lawrence families to play host to high school exchange students for the next academic year. Students will be from Europe, Latin America or Asia, and will provide their own insurance and spending money.
Late-summer crops extend garden season
June 6, 2001
By Gwyn Mellinger No sooner do I get the summer garden in each year than the mail brings the winter catalog from Territorial Seed Co. While it may seem like a stretch to begin thinking about another round of planting so soon, this may be the answer for the painful withdrawal that afflicts die-hard vegetable gardeners at the end of every summer.
Skeptics being heard on Bush tax cut
June 6, 2001
By David Broder Washington Post Writers Group According to a poll in the current issue of Newsweek, 67 percent of Americans favor President Bush’s proposed $1.6 trillion tax cut, but a nearly identical 65 percent say it is more important that the projected budget surpluses be used to reduce the national debt.
Twins pick hometown catcher No. 1
Mauer tickled to go to Minnesota; Prior selected by Cubs with second pick
June 6, 2001
The Minnesota Twins made one of their biggest fans a major part of their future. Joe Mauer, a left-handed hitting high school catcher from Cretin-Derham Hall in St. Paul, Minn., was taken by the Twins with the No. 1 pick in Tuesday’s baseball draft.
Kansas City punchless in latest loss - White sox 6, Royals 2
Chicago wins 5th in row; Sanchez’ streak ends
June 6, 2001
Ray Durham and Magglio Ordonez each homered Tuesday night, leading the Chicago White Sox to their fifth straight victory, 6-2 over the Kansas City Royals. Kip Wells pitched 61*3 innings, allowing four hits, for the White Sox, who have won 10 of 11. The Royals lost their fourth straight and dropped to 20-37, matching their worst record ever after 57 games.
Local duo dominates
Marshall, Stewart take early Fourball lead
June 6, 2001
By Robert Sinclair Kansas University junior-to-be Chris Marshall took home some hardware from the Kansas Golf Assn.’s Fourball Championship on Tuesday at Alvamar. No, his trophy wasn’t for winning the title with playing partner and former Jayhawk Andy Stewart, but by the looks of things, it might as well have been.
Business Briefcase
June 6, 2001
Economy: Productivity falls Internet: Amazon.com aims for profitability Automaker: GM gives shareholders update on Hughes deal Appliances: Maytag buys rival Auto industry: Ford expands recall of Firestone tires
People
June 6, 2001