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Archive for Sunday, July 8, 2001

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Question emerges: Where can a big box go?
July 8, 2001
jmathis@ljworld.com After two recent denials, some are wondering whether there is any suitable location in Lawrence for a big box development.
Collins Obit
July 8, 2001
Harley Collins Services for Harley E. Collins, 74, Lawrence, will be 10 a.m. Wednesday at Lawrence Wesleyan Church. Burial will be at Memorial Park Cemetery.
SUN Get involved
July 8, 2001
Get involved The issue of allowing commercial, “big box” development — on South Iowa Street and elsewhere — is one of the issues raising interest in planning in Douglas County.
SWB raising cost of calls at pay phones
July 8, 2001
Kansas City, Mo. (ap) — Calling home is about to get a little more expensive. Southwestern Bell said Friday that it plans to raise the cost of a call from its pay phones to 50 cents. Emergency 911 calls and toll-free numbers will still be free.
7-8 kovels prices
July 8, 2001
Current prices Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in locations because of local economic conditions.
Raiders split twinbills
July 8, 2001
Like the weather, Lawrence’s Raiders’ bats were red hot against Blue Valley on Saturday at Free State’s baseball field. The Raiders combined for 29 hits in a 15-10 l American Legion loss and 15-7 victory over the Tigers.
Business briefcase add event
July 8, 2001
Kansas University Chancellor Robert Hemenway is the scheduled speaker for next week’s meeting of the Lawrence Technology Assn. The meeting is set for noon July 16 at Pachamama’s, 2161 Quail Creek Drive.
Business briefcase (additional)
July 8, 2001
Joe Jones, principal for The Executive Benefits Group, Lawrence, delivered a speech, “Beyond the Retirement Plan-A Look at Non-Qualified Plan Opportunities,” during the Securities Industry Assn’s sixth-annual Savings, Retirement and Estate Planning Conference. The conference was May 2 at the World Trade Center in New York. The talk focused on the planning opportunities for executives to defer financial compensation beyond IRS limits on a pre-tax discriminatory basis.
Fishing Report
July 8, 2001
(Last update in parentheses) CLINTON LAKE (July 6) — Water 79 degrees, clear and 1.7 feet above normal pool. Channel catfish good on a varsity of baits including crawdads, minnows, lives, stinkbait and worms off clay points or on mudflats. Crappie fair on jigs and minnows at about 12 feet off channel or other structure. Walleye good trolling crankbaits on flats. White Hellbenders and Rattletraps working well. Some are being caught drifting jig and nightcrawler.
SUN Salute box
July 8, 2001
Bountiful bouquet Events included in this year’s “Salute! A Festival of Wine and Food,” a fund-raiser for Cottonwood Inc., are:
Bullfrog season
July 8, 2001
Pratt — In Kansas mid-summer, 100 degrees in the shade is not uncommon, and the only comfortable place outside is in the water. But in the water doesn’t necessarily mean in the swimming pool. To many Kansans, summertime means a time to beat the heat by going bullfrogging. The season lasts from July 1 through Oct. 31, and the daily creel limit is eight frogs.
7-8 Bruce column
July 8, 2001
Landscape trees and shrubs with yellowing leaves may be victims of spider mites. While the mites can be difficult to see, their damage is easy to find. Watch for trees and shrubs with off-color leaves that are beginning to fall. A closer look may reveal infestation.
Two pedestrians struck by vehicles
July 8, 2001
Two pedestrians struck by vehicles within minutes of each other in downtown Lawrence Friday night escaped with minor injuries. Katy Nitcher, 46, Lawrence, was struck and knocked to the ground about 7:40 p.m. by a green Dodge Ram pickup while walking north across Seventh Street at New Hampshire Street with her husband, Sgt. Paul Fellers of the Lawrence Police Department said.
Blotter
July 8, 2001
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
Kehde column for July 8
July 8, 2001
In mid-June, Steve Hoffman and Rich Eckholm, both of Brainerd, Minn., arrived in Lawrence with designs of spending four nights on the Kansas River. The plan was for Hoffman to catch several big flathead catfish on a rod and reel and for Eckholm to tape the catches for a segment of In-Fisherman’s television program, as well as some footage for a new In-Fisherman how-to videotape.
Saturday Best Bets
July 8, 2001
TODAY Josh Joplin Group, 9 p.m., The Bottleneck, 737 N.H.
Arts notes
July 8, 2001
Flood of 1951 subject of new PBS program Tour of downtown sculptures planned Ann-Margret to appear in ‘Little Whorehouse’
Hendrick wins truck race
July 8, 2001
ahartsock@ljworld.com Kansas City, Kan. — When he was introduced as the No. 2 qualifier for the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series O’Reilly Auto Parts 250, Ricky Hendrick couldn’t keep his eye off the pole-winner’s prize.
Soundoff on levee access
July 8, 2001
I own a house on Oak Street up by the levee. On nice days there are vehicles that drive up to the access gate and people with keys will go in. I don’t think it’s official business because they will go in with bikes and stuff. To get access beyond the gate, does it have to be official business? Fred DeVictor, the city’s Parks and Recreation director, said: “Levee access is provided to volunteers who are maintaining and improving the mountain bike trails east of the eighth and Oak Street boat ramp, under the guidance of the Mountain Bike Club and volunteer bike patrol, which was formed last year. To inquire about volunteering, contact the Parks and Recreation at 832-3450.”
Outdoors briefs
July 8, 2001
Clinton real hot spot for walleye fishing
SUN Cairo on the Kaw
July 8, 2001
jbiles@ljworld.com Jo Anne Hargis says the upcoming concert by Troupe Raghsidad is hip and hip-centric: The show mixes Middle Eastern dance with the “shaken but not stirred” music of KANU-FM 91.5’s “Retro Cocktail Hour.”
Habitat starts construction on 39th house
July 8, 2001
Lawrence Habitat program makes headway in Eudora
SUN LIG big box precede
July 8, 2001
jmathis@ljworld.com MORE: www.ljworld.com/section/growth
SAVING LIVES New bills would streamline organ donation process
July 8, 2001
jludwig@ljworld.com When Jim Ellis died June 19, it was unclear whether he had decided to seek the heart transplant his doctors told him was his only hope.
SUN District debates widespread use of portable classrooms
July 8, 2001
tcarpenter@ljworld.com When it was placed there 20 years ago, a mobile classroom at West Junior High School was called “temporary.”
Correction
July 8, 2001
A photo caption on page 2B of Saturday’s Journal-World misidentified a youth taking part in a Lawrence Arts Center program. The boy’s name is Mark Walbridge.
Sharp snares IRL pole
July 8, 2001
ahartsock@ljworld.com Kansas City, Kan. — Scott Sharp knew his car was fast, but he didn’t know it was fast enough to earn him his fourth career Indy Racing League pole.
Players turn summer exhibition into money game
July 8, 2001
There is simply no way to eliminate controversy in the selection of the All-Star teams. With fans allowed to vote for the starters and managers required to have at least one player from each team, it’s a no-win proposition that wouldn’t be improved much by another system.
Walker likely to be limited at Tuesday’s All-Star game
Sore elbow to prevent Colorado slugger from playing defense
July 8, 2001
Colorado Rockies right fielder Larry Walker likely will not play in the field during next week’s All-Star game because of inflammation in his right elbow. Walker, who is hitting .343 with 27 home runs and 83 RBIs, was out of the Colorado lineup Saturday night against the Anaheim Angels and is expected to miss today’s series finale.
Decision to back U.N. tribunal brings Croatia political crisis
July 8, 2001
In an emergency meeting that immediately plunged Croatia into a political crisis, the Cabinet on Saturday gave the green light for any citizen indicted by the U.N. war crimes tribunal to be arrested and extradited.
Officer has history of excessive force
Warsaw policeman investigated for killing unarmed runaway suspect
July 8, 2001
The Warsaw police officer who shot an unarmed man earlier this week had been fired from his past job as a jailer because he used excessive force, Pettis County Sheriff Gary Starke said.
Bolivia confirms its president has lung cancer
July 8, 2001
President Hugo Banzer has cancer in his lung and liver, the government’s spokesman said Saturday, calling his condition “grave” but saying he hadn’t yet decided whether to resign as leader of South America’s poorest nation.
Sci-fi writers land at KU
July 8, 2001
By Terry Rombeck When Frederik Pohl had his first science-fiction work a poem published in 1937, the Internet was as much a fantasy as little green men. Now, 64 years and about 100 novels later, Pohl says the Internet is the future of science-fiction publishing even though he has no plans to join in on the technological wave.
Fed chair losing his Midas touch
July 8, 2001
In Alan Greenspan’s case, it’s hard to say that “pride goeth before the fall.” He’s too self-effacing for the charge to stick. But how about “public adulation goeth …”?
Cemetery’s history set in stone
New ownership brings Hollywood Memorial Park back to life
July 8, 2001
Three years ago, one of the world’s most famous cemeteries was resting in pieces. Tombstones were toppled or broken. Mausoleums were flooded, their roofs falling in. The grounds were unkempt, and sections were so crowded that some grave sites were nearly inaccessible.
Horoscopes
July 8, 2001
Portable classrooms under fire
Quick fix’ likely to last
July 8, 2001
By Tim Carpenter When it was placed there 20 years ago, a mobile classroom at West Junior High School was called “temporary.” It’s still there. “I’m convinced one bolt is holding it together,” West Principal Mick Lowe said. Skunks often turn crawl spaces underneath three dozen other prefabricated portables anchored in Lawrence’s schoolyards into cozy, scented dwellings.
City plan thinks outside ‘big box’
Development controversy focuses attention
July 8, 2001
By Joel Mathis What’s the matter with big boxes? In recent months, the Lawrence City Commission has turned down rezoning for two “big-box” developments: One, slated for 31st and Iowa streets, was to be anchored by a Home Depot; another, planned for Sixth Street and Wakarusa Drive, was to be anchored by an unidentified home improvement store.
What’s in a name? Visit reveals roots
Lawrence, Mass., has history of immigration and Kansas migration
July 8, 2001
By Chuck Woodling First you notice the eye-catching clock and bell towers. Then you spot the massive red-brick mill buildings. You can’t miss them. They loom like Kansas grain elevators. This is Lawrence. Not the Lawrence you live in. This is Lawrence, Mass., our city’s namesake. While on a trip back East, curiosity lured my wife and I off Interstate 495 about 25 miles north of Boston onto the streets of Lawrence, Mass.
Sense for seniors
July 8, 2001
Business briefs
July 8, 2001
Pennies and nickels
Designer crafts furniture made of coins
July 8, 2001
Artist Johnny Swing, a welder with a wide-ranging repertoire, learned a lot about coins when he started joining thousands of them to produce furniture. As he created two chairs made of pennies, he figured out that pennies made after 1981 had an added metal that caused them to disintegrate when welded. He switched to nickels for his next project, a sofa.
Slow confirmations hinder Cabinet
July 8, 2001
By David Broder Washington Post Writers Group When Gale Norton was chosen as secretary of interior, it was a controversial nomination. So she had to wait 10 days longer than almost all her Cabinet colleagues, until Jan. 30, for Senate confirmation.
7-8 garden spot breakout
July 8, 2001
Take a peek The Sunflower Water Garden Society will offer a tour of Lawrence gardens from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and from noon to 4 p.m. July 15.
Cottonwood pops cork on wine festival, hopes to raise $45,000
July 8, 2001
jbiles@ljworld.com Cottonwood Inc. is using a “swirl, sniff and sip” strategy to raise money.
Sunday datebook
July 8, 2001
TODAY All summer: Adolescent (ages 12-17) 3-dose hepatitis B series, Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department, 200 Maine, Suite B, 843-0721. Fee charged.
Water tour Sabatini
July 8, 2001
Richard Gwin/Journal-World Photo DAN AND NICOLE SABATINI enjoy a evening in their backyard, at 705 Maine where they have moved stone and planted water plants around a small pond, filling up the small quite area.
7-8 kovels cutline
July 8, 2001
THIS RARE BAIT-CASTING REEL was made by George W. Gayle & Son of Frankfort, Ky. It is a handmade German-silver reel. Last year it sold at a Lang’s Sporting Collectables auction in Raymond, Maine, for $4,400.
(breakout box) Too hot to handle?
July 8, 2001
Too hot to handle? Value investing is so “in” that it soon may be “out,” said Steve Leuthold, chairman of Leuthold Group in Minneapolis. During the last 16 months, value stocks are up more than 30 percent, while growth stocks are down more than 30 percent.
Sci-fi writers discuss future publishing markets
July 8, 2001
trombeck@ljworld.com When Frederik Pohl had his first science fiction work — a poem — published in 1937, the Internet was as much a fantasy as little green men.
Sunday Woodling column
July 8, 2001
Nobody journeys to the Douglas County 4-H Fairgrounds on a summer evening for the scenery. Intruding into the Eastern sky like a rusting erector set are the tangled steel pipes of the dormant Farmland Industries plant. Off to the north in a draw sits an automobile junkyard.
Field dedicated to late baseball volunteer
July 8, 2001
mmiller@ljworld.com Becky Cowser has been telling herself that her late husband, Tom, is just out on a storm call and too busy to call home.
Births
July 8, 2001
* Nick and Jaime Thompson, Baldwin, a boy, Friday. * Mr. and Mrs. Roland Haslett Jr., Lawrence, a boy, Friday.
SUN Cairo box
July 8, 2001
Middle Eastern flare What: “Cairo on the Kaw Meets the Retro Cocktail Hour.”
Arts notes
July 8, 2001
Slide show depicts African safari Ag Hall of Fame show celebrates farm heritage Jazz series begins at Kemper Museum Discovery validates precious metals Mother-daughter duo to sing at library
Webber saga to drag on in NBA
Free agent forward to pick one of eight teams
July 8, 2001
Chris Webber, the prize free agent in this summer’s NBA class, swears he has “options that people don’t realize” other than re-signing with the Sacramento Kings. But as the 18-day negotiating phase reached the one-third mark this weekend, few NBA insiders believe he’ll be joining a new team later this month.
NAACP convention begins in Big Easy
Civil rights group ready to work with Bush, but vows it will fight for its beliefs
July 8, 2001
The Bush administration should focus on racial profiling, election reform and racial disparities in the death penalty, NAACP president Kweisi Mfume said Saturday. “We recognize that this administration will be with us for four years,” Mfume said at a news conference kicking off the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People convention.
Old home town - 25, 40, and 100 years ago today
July 8, 2001
The Motley Fool
July 8, 2001
Name that company ETFs Not so great
Middle East flair
Troupe Raghsidad meets the ‘Retro Cocktail Hour’
July 8, 2001
By Jan Biles Jo Anne Hargis says the upcoming concert by Troupe Raghsidad is hip and hip-centric: The show mixes Middle Eastern dance with the “shaken but not stirred” music of KANU-FM 91.5’s “Retro Cocktail Hour.” “I had been listening to ‘The Retro Cocktail Hour’ for a while, and they did an exotica show,” Hargis, artistic director of Troupe Raghsidad, said.
Speedway sizzles under summer sun
July 8, 2001
ahartsock@ljworld.com Kansas City, Kan. — The Kansas University Medical Center earned its title of official health care provider at Kansas Speedway on Saturday.
Baseball scores
July 8, 2001
Youth Results USSSA State Championships
Sharp snares IRL pole
Driver has fast lap of 216.175 at Ameristar Casino 200 qualifying
July 8, 2001
By Andrew Hartsock Scott Sharp knew his car was fast, but he didn’t know it was fast enough to earn him his fourth career Indy Racing League pole. Sharp qualified first Saturday for today’s Ameristar Casino Indy 200 at Kansas Speedway with a fast lap of 216.175 mph, 25.3128 seconds to edge runner-up qualifier Eddie Cheever Jr. by .09 mph.
Roger Bryan
July 8, 2001
Briefcase
July 8, 2001
Entrepreneurs: Present-day Ben Franklin would key on technology Employment: How to boost office morale? Talk value of 401(k), benefits Motley Fool: Name that company
SUN Rusty Diamond box
July 8, 2001
Brush strokes What: An exhibition of paintings by Rusty Diamond and Allen Knows Gun.
People
July 8, 2001
Marriage: a royal uncertainty Warhol digs on the market Tootsie loses on appeal More than a Trace of alcohol
World Briefs
July 8, 2001
Peru: Another earthquake shakes unsteady region North Korea: Defector’s U.S. visit comes under criticism HONG KONG: Destructive storm sweeps into China Germany: Hundreds turn out to grieve Kohl’s wife
1951 literary offerings stand the test of time
July 8, 2001
By Calder Pickett When I did some looking into 1951, which was 50 years ago, I was reminded it was a year that gave us four fine novels, books I’ve reread, and three of which made it to the movie screen and triumphantly so.
Husband has clear conflict of interest in transactions for disabled wife
July 8, 2001
Bookstore
July 8, 2001
7-8 Do you support the legal drinking age?
July 8, 2001
Do you support the legal drinking age of 21? Kerra Goetz,
1951 literary offerings stand the test of time
July 8, 2001
When I did some looking into 1951, which was 50 years ago, I was reminded that it was a year which gave us four fine novels, books l’ve reread and three of which made it to the movie screen, and triumphantly so. All four books sit there on my shelves. I probably bought all four in paperback, but I see that two are in hardback. All were best-sellers, and one of them has become a legend, a book of controversy that the censors have landed on.
SUN Rusty Diamond
July 8, 2001
jbiles@ljworld.com Nearly every image Rusty Diamond paints keeps a bit of his tribal heritage alive. He painstakingly researches his subjects, making sure every detail adheres to the traditions and history of the Pawnee.
Business briefcase for front
July 8, 2001
EMPLOYMENT Knowing value of insurance, 401(k) input boosts morale
7-8 Woodling on Lawrence, Mass.
July 8, 2001
cwoodling@ljworld.com www.ci.lawrence.ma.us/
Local briefs
July 8, 2001
Science-fiction authors have book-signing for fans Science-fiction enthusiasts met Saturday at Mt. Oread Bookshop in the Kansas Union for a book-signing by science-fiction authors visiting Lawrence. The signing was part of the two-day Intensive English Institute on the Teaching of Science Fiction offered by Kansas University’s J. Wayne and Elsie M. Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction. Science-fiction author Justin Leiber discusses his writing with Ruth Lichtwardt. About 40 science-fiction and fantasy writers, scholars and students gathered at KU this week to discuss “Science Fiction in the Electronic Era.” __________________________ Community: Lawrence Habitat program makes headway in Eudora The nail-driving for the first Lawrence Habitat for Humanity home to be built outside of Lawrence will be Saturday. The new home Lawrence Habitat’s 39th since 1989 will be constructed at 625 Locust in Eudora for the Williams family. The public is invited to participate in the nail-driving, which will begin at 9 a.m. Funding for the project has come from donations and fund-raising events in Eudora during the past year. __________________________ City planning: Public meeting scheduled on city transportation Area residents who want to put in their two cents about the future of Lawrence’s transportation system will have a chance at public meetings July 16 and 17. Lawrence-Douglas County Planning Department representatives will discuss the long-term Transportation 2025 Plan. The meetings will focus on evaluating the existing system, reviewing a proposed criteria to evaluate the system and analyzing proposed changes to and problems with the future system. Five meetings are scheduled: Noon to 1:30 p.m., July 16, Holcom Park Recreation Center, 2700 W. 27th St. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., July 16, East Lawrence Recreation Center, 1245 East 15th St. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., July 16, Lawrence Indoor Aquatic Center, 4706 Overland Drive. Noon to 1:30 p.m., July 17, Wal-Mart Community Education “Green” Room, 3300 Iowa. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., July 17, Baldwin City Library, 800 E. Seventh St., Baldwin. __________________________ University: KU nursing program gets system upgrade The Kansas University Medical Center School of Nursing will develop a new Web-based nurse educator specialty within the Master of Science Program for Advanced Practice Nurses, thanks to a $112,000 grant from the Department of Health and Human Services. U.S. Senator Pat Roberts, R.-Kan., announced the grant Friday. The expanded program will provide a chance for nursing students to develop educator skills in clinical courses through the use of Web-based teaching strategies and faculty mentors. Roberts a member of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pension who has long supported efforts to expand the nursing population sponsored the Nursing Employment and Education Development Act, which authorized $100 million to assist in the recruitment and retention of nurses. __________________________ Gasoline prices: Pump patrol tracks down lowest prices in Lawrence The Journal-World has found a Lawrence-area gasoline price as low as $1.119 a gallon at Site Service Station, 946 E. 23rd St. If you find a lower price, please call us at 832-7154. Be prepared to leave the name of the business, the address and the price. Or go to www.ljworld.com/section/gasoline to join our Pump Patrol message board.
Phone friend not obliged to take care of hangups
July 8, 2001
Sunday business briefs
July 8, 2001
Faces and places Lawrence Memorial Hospital recently announced three employee appointments.
7-8 Roger Martin column
July 8, 2001
More: www.ukans.edu/~spencer/exhibits/great It’s 1851. You’re in London, strolling along a grand hallway in a building made largely of glass — almost a million square feet of it. The glass is held in place by 4,000 tons of iron and 202 miles of wooden bars.
SUN rail briefs
July 8, 2001
Tour of downtown sculptures planned
World Briefs
July 8, 2001
Nepal: Rebels turn on police; at least 38 are killed LONDON: Onetime spy chief wins OK to publish memoirs\ HAVANA: Castro defies rumors with speech to 20,000 MOSCOW: Television director suffers fatal beating
Travel briefs
July 8, 2001
Holocaust Museum plans expansion Hudson Valley retreat offers activity programs
Travel briefs
July 8, 2001
Hudson Valley retreat offers activity programs
Sense for seniors
July 8, 2001
I’ve heard a lot in the news about the dangers of skin cancer. Having worked outside much of my life, I’m really worried. Is there some way I can check my skin and know if there are problem areas developing? Not being a medical expert, I turned to the Cancer Information Service for an answer to your question. Here is the information that center provided:
Nation Briefs
July 8, 2001
NEW YORK: Policy yanks immunity for parking scofflaws Washington: Armored vehicle rollover claims lives of Marines
Friends and neighbors
July 8, 2001
Pedestrians hit by autos
July 8, 2001
Two pedestrians struck by vehicles within minutes of each other in downtown Lawrence Friday night escaped with minor injuries. Katy Nitcher, 46, Lawrence, was struck and knocked to the ground about 7:40 p.m. by a green Dodge Ram pickup while walking north across Seventh Street at New Hampshire Street with her husband, Sgt. Paul Fellers of the Lawrence Police Department said.
Stewart faces penalties
July 8, 2001
Tony Stewart was facing severe penalties from NASCAR for breaking a strict racing rule in the final laps of the Pepsi 400 and ignoring a black flag. Stewart was running in second place with four laps to go Saturday night as he neared the start/finish line.
Pepsi 400 notebook: Spears appears at Daytona
Grand Marshal invited guest to pre-race meeting; daughter of Marlin crew chief leaves pit for autograph
July 8, 2001
Hearts were racing and seating was limited in the drivers’ meeting Saturday night thanks to a special appearance by pop star Britney Spears. As the grand marshal for the Pepsi 400, Spears was an invited guest to the traditional pre-race meeting. Her inclusion meant young children were suddenly interested in following their fathers to the meeting.
Pruett edges Fellows
Pole speed: 121 mph
July 8, 2001
Led by former sports car champion Scott Pruett, road-course aces took the first four positions Saturday in qualifying for the GNC Live Well 200 at Watkins Glen International. Pruett ran just one lap Saturday but it was enough to his Ford on the pole for Sunday’s NASCAR Busch series race with a fast lap of 121.052 mph on the 2.45-mile track
Earnhardt Jr. victorious
Driver wins at scene of father’s tragic death
July 8, 2001
Dale Earnhardt Jr. raced to a storybook triumph at the scene of his father’s death Saturday night, winning the Pepsi 400 and producing the most poignant turn yet to this bittersweet season.
Wizards win
July 8, 2001
Chris Brown scored in second-half injury time, as the Kansas City Wizards beat New England 2-1 Saturday night, snapping the Revolution’s five-game unbeaten streak.
Miami snaps Monarchs’ streak
Baranova scores 21 points to boost Sol to 66-54 victory over Sacramento
July 8, 2001
Elena Baranova scored 21 points as the Miami Sol beat Sacramento 66-54 Saturday night, snapping the Monarchs’ five-game winning streak. The Sol (7-9), who had lost nine of their last 12 games, shot a franchise-best 54 percent and faced a nine-point deficit twice in the first half.
Dupay counsels at camp
Florida guard aiding prepsters
July 8, 2001
At first glance, it seems like a scenario too strange to be true. Florida guard Teddy Dupay, the subject of an investigation into possible gambling violations, works as a counselor for high school players at the Nike All-America Camp.
Raiders split with Blue Valley
July 8, 2001
By Kelly Rathbun Like the weather, Lawrence’s Raiders’ bats were red hot against Blue Valley on Saturday at Free State’s baseball field. The Raiders combined for 29 hits in a 15-10 American Legion loss and 15-7 victory over the Tigers.
Baseball Briefs
July 8, 2001
Tigers place Borkowski on DL Neagle leaves game with bum hamstring Braves put Furcal on DL Schourek sidelined Marlins’ Penny ailing
Nelson to replace Rivera on AL roster
Torre drops Yankee reliever because of ankle injury, picks Mariner to fill All-Star spot
July 8, 2001
New York Yankees closer Mariano Rivera was dropped from the AL All-Star roster because of an ankle injury and replaced by Seattle reliever Jeff Nelson on Saturday. Joe Torre, manager of the Yankees and the AL team, made the announcement immediately after Rivera allowed three runs in the 10th inning as the Yankees lost to the Mets 3-0.
National League Roundup: Hernandez boosts Brewers
July 8, 2001
After Jose Hernandez slipped in center field and allowed the San Francisco Giants to score a run, he was looking to redeem himself. Hernandez came back in the next inning to hit his first of two home runs as Milwaukee beat the Giants, 13-3, Saturday.
Interleague Roundup: Mets halt Yanks’ streak
Indians overcome McGwire slam to clip Cards
July 8, 2001
Just when it seemed the Mets might never get another hit with a runner in scoring position, Mike Piazza touched off a string of three in a row. Piazza singled off closer Mariano Rivera in the 10th inning to break a scoreless tie Saturday and the Mets beat the Yankees, 3-0, ending the World Series champions’ nine-game winning streak.
Pak first at Kroger Classic
Golfer surges to four-stroke advantage
July 8, 2001
When Se Ri Pak uses the word “perfect” to describe her swing, that can only be bad news for her rivals. “I’m happy with the way I’m hitting the ball. Everything’s pretty much perfect,” Pak said Saturday after repelling several challenges while doubling her lead to four strokes through three rounds of the Jamie Farr Kroger Classic.
Russia takes chance on raising sub
July 8, 2001
Eleven months after a Russian nuclear-powered submarine sank in the Barents Sea, an international team is to begin this week an attempt to raise it without triggering its torpedoes or spilling radiation from its reactors.
Massive razing considered for oak forest
July 8, 2001
The U.S. Forest Service wants to allow harvesting of oak trees ravaged by beetles and drought on 25,000 acres of national forest in southern Missouri. “The continued drought triggers a series of events by weakening trees,” said Ross Melick, a forester with the Mark Twain National Forest. “They are more susceptible to diseases and insects.”
Drivers applaud Speedway
July 8, 2001
The Indianapolis Motor Speedway will always be No. 1 in the hearts of Indy Racing League drivers. But even before today’s Ameristar Casino Indy 200, the new Kansas Speedway has earned its share of ardent admirers.
Evidence suppression sought in barrel case
July 8, 2001
Attorneys for accused serial killer John E. Robinson have filed two motions to suppress evidence in the case, claiming police wrongly obtained evidence by digging in Robinson’s trash.
Macedonia leaders agree to work toward peace
July 8, 2001
Hoping to turn a cease-fire into permanent peace, international envoys on Saturday handed the framework of a reconciliation plan to leaders in Macedonia’s ethnically mixed government.
Hospital tells prison to find another supplier of execution chemicals
July 8, 2001
A hospital has decided to end its practice of supplying the state prison system with the chemicals used in executions, after a request from an anti-death penalty group. The Corrections Department will find another supplier of the drugs and the hospital’s decision shouldn’t delay the execution of Jerald Wayne Harjo, who is scheduled to die July 17, said department spokesman Jerry Massie.
Domestic dispute ends in police chief’s slaying
July 8, 2001
The police chief of a northeastern Utah town was shot and killed while trying to arrest a suspect in a domestic dispute, police said Saturday. Roosevelt Police Chief Cecil Gurr and other officers had responded to a report of a man beating a woman Friday evening in a convenience store parking lot, authorities said.
Floridians battle alligator attacks
Development, human intrusion blamed for increasing aggression
July 8, 2001
One minute, Dagmar Dow was treading water at a nudist resort on Big Moss Lake. The next, she was fighting for her life as a 9 1/2-foot alligator clamped its powerful jaws on her left foot and began to pull her under, its thick tail whipping her body.
Region Brief
July 8, 2001
Fourth victim of boating accident recovered
eBay winner makes plans for 7-ton flag
July 8, 2001
Ted Dorfman of Greensburg, Pa., has big plans for the 7-ton American flag he just bought through an Internet auction for $12,300. He plans to create a nonprofit corporation to represent the flag. It would be made available for display, and proceeds would be given to veterans’ organizations and groups that support veterans.
Retractable roof seems unlikely at Wimbledon
July 8, 2001
Frustrated fans and players might prefer a retractable roof over the grass at Centre Court, but that seems as unlikely as the tradition-steeped tournament being played on artificial turf. Light rain Saturday permitted only 52 minutes of play on Centre Court. A men’s semifinal will be completed today followed by the women’s final between Venus Williams and Justine Henin.
Congressman wants probe of Nissan financing
July 8, 2001
A congressman is asking the House Financial Services Committee to investigate Nissan’s auto financing practices, citing a study that found blacks regularly paid higher finance charges than whites.
Nebraska sweats record temperatures
July 8, 2001
Central Nebraska may not offer the nightlife of New York or Los Angeles, but it can still claim a slot as one of the nation’s hot spots this summer. On Friday, sweltering temperatures soared over 100 degrees in at least 14 communities across the state, and McCook recorded the highest temperature in the nation at 111 degrees.
Small-town banks head to Johnson County
July 8, 2001
What’s a bank in Medicine Lodge, Kan., population 2,400, doing with a branch in Johnson County, in wealthy suburban Kansas City nearly 250 miles away? It’s doing what banks do going where the money is.
Question emerges: Where can a big box go?
July 8, 2001
By Joel Mathis After two recent denials, some are wondering whether there is any suitable location in Lawrence for a big-box development. Dan Watkins, an attorney representing one of the spurned developments, doesn’t think so. “There are not other suitable sites in the city zoned or planned for such a development,” he wrote in a letter to city commissioners.
State Brief
July 8, 2001
Goodland: History will be the focus of new travel center
Jack Parker
July 8, 2001
Harold Rehm
July 8, 2001
Florence Maley
July 8, 2001
Georgie Furrow
July 8, 2001
Harley Collins
July 8, 2001
Carmen Purcell
July 8, 2001
Bush wooing Catholics as re-election strategy
July 8, 2001
It was more than a social call: Five days after taking office, President Bush paid a visit to Washington Archbishop Theodore E. McCarrick, foreshadowing what has become a meticulous outreach to the nation’s Roman Catholics a bloc he sees as vital if he is to have a prayer of re-election.
On the record
July 8, 2001
Brady Bunch’ collaborator dies
July 8, 2001
Television writer Arnold Peyser, part of the husband-wife team that scripted such shows as “The Brady Bunch” and “My Three Sons,” has died. He was 80. Peyser died of cancer July 1 in his Brentwood home.
Authors envision Clintons’ fictional futures
July 8, 2001
Imagine this: Bill Clinton is frightened out of Chappaqua by the Headless Horsewoman, then returns years later to find his wife is president and has married Elvis Presley. No? Would you believe Bill becomes a preacher? Crashes a party at Westchester County’s only trailer park?
Love keeps Western lead
July 8, 2001
After flirting with birdies all over the front nine, something clicked when Davis Love III made the turn. Maybe he felt Scott Hoch, Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods closing in on him.
Moreau first in prologue
July 8, 2001
Lance Armstrong finished third in the opening prologue of the Tour de France on Saturday, with the yellow jersey now belonging to a Frenchman Christophe Moreau. Armstrong, going for a third straight title in cycling’s showcase event, was four seconds behind leader Moreau after the first day of the three-week race.
Hendrick snares first victory
Rookie youngest to win NASCAR truck race
July 8, 2001
By Andrew Hartsock When he was introduced as the No. 2 qualifier for the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series O’Reilly Auto Parts 250, Ricky Hendrick couldn’t keep his eye off the pole-winner’s prize. For claiming the pole Friday, Dennis Setzer won a pedal-push car sized for preschoolers, and Hendrick who, at 21, looked barely too old to climb inside and take the trophy for a spin expressed his displeasure at missing the prize by just one slot.
SW Bell increasing pay-phone call rates
Cell phones have hurt industry, officials say
July 8, 2001
Calling home is about to get a little more expensive. Southwestern Bell said Friday that it plans to raise the cost of a call from its pay phones to 50 cents. Emergency 911 calls and toll-free numbers will still be free. Southwestern Bell parent SBC Communications Inc. said it will make the change at all of its 414,000 pay phones by September. The company has pay phones in 13 states, including Kansas.
Proposed legislation would streamline organ transplants
July 8, 2001
By Joy Ludwig When Jim Ellis died June 19, it was unclear whether he had decided to seek the heart transplant his doctors told him was his only hope. Even if he had, there was no guarantee the 54-year-old Lawrence man would have received the organ he needed to survive, due to a formidable waiting list.
Field dedicated to late baseball volunteer
July 8, 2001
By Mindie Miller Becky Cowser has been telling herself that her late husband, Tom, is just out on a storm call and too busy to call home. A journeyman lineman for KPL, Tom Cowser often was called out to repair electric lines damaged by storms.
Take a close look for spider mites before damage to plants is evident
July 8, 2001
By Bruce Chladny Landscape trees and shrubs with yellowing leaves may be victims of spider mites. While the mites can be difficult to see, their damage is easy to find. Watch for trees and shrubs with off-color leaves that are beginning to fall. A closer look may reveal infestation. Spider mites are not true insects but are closely related to spiders and chiggers. The tiny mites are hard to see with the unaided eye.
Wonderful water works
Creativity, tranquility flow in gardens on upcoming tour
July 8, 2001
By Carol Boncella A small pond filled with large lotus plants sits in a neatly compact back yard. Wildflowers growing in a wide side garden, herbs thriving in containers along the deck and a sculpture sitting just inside a unique back fence enhance the charm of this Old West Lawrence oasis. The picturesque garden space is the handiwork of architects Dan and Nicole, who began their garden venture about two years ago.
KU Medical Center helps fans fight the heat at speedway
July 8, 2001
By Andrew Hartsock The Kansas University Medical Center earned its title of official health care provider at Kansas Speedway on Saturday. The KU Med Care Center in the Kansas Speedway infield and its first-aid stations in the grandstands treated 220 race fans in Saturday’s swelter.
Public input sought on development issues
July 8, 2001
The issue of allowing commercial, “big box” development on South Iowa Street and elsewhere is one of the issues raising interest in planning in Douglas County. What do you think? What should the policy be? You are invited to share your opinions and ideas at a community meeting beginning at 7 p.m. Monday at the Lawrence Visitor Information Center, 402 N. Second St.
Rain forces postponement of men’s, women’s finals
July 8, 2001
When Venus Williams first came to Wimbledon four years ago, rain delayed her debut for five days, and then she lost in the opening round. On Saturday, with the stakes much higher, she played the waiting game again but no tennis. Williams sat through an afternoon of persistent drizzle before her final against Belgian Justine Henin was postponed until today.
Economic downturn eases search for big-city hotel rooms
This summer, there’s room at New York City inns thanks to construction boom and dropping demand
July 8, 2001
Dreaming of rowing in Central Park, museum hopping on Fifth Avenue or catching a jazz show in the Village? Now’s your chance. In Manhattan, where there was virtually no room at the inn for most of last year, more hotel rooms are going vacant and at least some prices are dropping. “The big difference is that now if you want to come to New York you can find a room.
Details emerge about missing intern’s D.C. romance
July 8, 2001
At times, Chandra Levy felt intoxicated by Washington. She moved into a trendy neighborhood near Dupont Circle, landed an internship in her field, toured the gleaming corridors of Congress, even snagged a ticket to see President Bush sworn into office.
Kansas seniors may qualify for prescription drug benefit
July 8, 2001
Eligible seniors can qualify for up to a $1,200 one-time benefit on prescription drugs through a program sponsored by the Kansas Department on Aging. Connie Hubbell, secretary of the department, said the benefit will be available by the end of the year.
Hunting Briefs
July 8, 2001
Walleye hot spot Hillsdale champs Missouri price hike
South Carolina lake yields big smallmouth
July 8, 2001
All Terry Dodson knew was that he had something big when the fish exploded out of Lake Jocassee in northwestern South Carolina. “She jumped four feet out of the water almost straight up,” said Dodson. As friend Dale Whitmire netted the lunker, Dodson recalled Whitmire’s words: “My God, what a fish!”
Bullfrogging one way to beat summer heat
Season will run through Oct. 31
July 8, 2001
In Kansas mid-summer, 100 degrees in the shade is not uncommon, and the only comfortable place outside is in the water. But in the water doesn’t necessarily mean in the swimming pool.
In-Fisherman duo picked wrong time
July 8, 2001
By Ned Kehde In mid-June, Steve Hoffman and Rich Eckholm, both of Brainerd, Minn., arrived in Lawrence with designs of spending four nights on the Kansas River. The plan was for Hoffman to catch several big flathead catfish on a rod and reel and for Eckholm to tape the catches for a segment of In-Fisherman’s television program, as well as some footage for a new In-Fisherman how-to videotape.
Veterans fight to get out the vote
Former servicemen pass democracy’s torch to new generation
July 8, 2001
Curt Ebitz served in the Army for 28 years and did two combat tours in Vietnam. Now he has enlisted in a fight against voter apathy among young people. Ebitz and dozens of other Florida veterans are taking part in a voter registration drive that pairs them with high school students. “The apathy and cynicism among young voters in particular is significant and a very disturbing trend,” says Ebitz, who is also a teacher.
Barbra’s advice may hold key to energy crisis
July 8, 2001
By Dave Barry Miami Herald Incredibly, despite the fact that I have already devoted an entire column to it, California’s energy crisis is getting worse. It’s so bad that, in some parts of the state, fireflies no longer have enough power to illuminate their own behinds.
Canada issues stamp set for track meet
July 8, 2001
The Canada Post has issued two new stamps to honor the International Amateur Athletic Federation World Championships, which will be held Aug. 3-12 in Edmonton, Alberta. This is the first time the event will be contested in North America. The first championships took place in Helsinki, Finland, in 1993.
Stem cell issue complicates pro-life debate
July 8, 2001
By Ellen Goodman The Boston Globe I suppose that those of us who have been in this struggle awhile can be forgiven for taking a little pleasure at the civil war erupting among our opponents. Suddenly, politicians who call themselves “pro-life” are fighting over who deserves to wear that uniform.
Bush seems out of step with Americans
July 8, 2001
By Larry Eichel Knight Ridder Newspapers On the nation’s 225th birthday, in front of Independence Hall, Philadelphia Mayor John Street introduced George W. Bush as the president of the United States and “our leader.” The two are not one and the same. There is no question that Bush is the former, considerable doubt about his being the latter.
Matter of history
July 8, 2001
Death penalty opposed
July 8, 2001
Anglers’ gear catches on with collectors
Fishing rods, reels and other equipment have unique allure
July 8, 2001
Search your garage and attic for old fishing gear, because prices are sailing out of sight. Reels, rods, lures, tackle and even tackle boxes are in demand. Fishing reels are separated into groups by age and type. The American reels made from about 1800 to 1875 were handmade by reelsmiths. The Golden Age of reels is from 1875 to 1900, when early machine-made reels were produced.
London exhibit traces American glass artist’s 25 years of work
July 8, 2001
A garden of richly colored glass ushers viewers into the Victoria and Albert Museum for a show on pioneering American glassblower Dale Chihuly that spans a quarter-century of his work. It is the first show in Britain for the Washington native. Chihuly and his team of 14 assistants needed more than two weeks to set the exhibition on the ground floor of the museum.
The Amber Spyglass: His Dark Materials Book III
July 8, 2001
This is an outstanding performance of the third installment in Pullman’s dark, creepy fantasy series about a mystical battle between good and evil. The only drawback is that the plot is impenetrable without reading the first two installments in the series. Pullman’s silver, disturbing voice narrates his tale (Listening Library, $45, 15 hours, unabridged) about brave-but-frightened youths lost in a world where celestial beings battle over the fate of existence.
And the river runs through it
Writer, reporter discovers Appalachia for himself
July 8, 2001
Take a childhood spent on the edges of Appalachia, mix it with a reporter’s unending search for stories to tell, and you might conclude it was inevitable that Noah Adams would produce his recent book, “Far Appalachia.” A National Public Radio correspondent since 1975, Adams has turned his hand to longer narratives, and in this volume he recounts his travels down the 350-mile course of the New River, from its origins on Snake Mountain in North Carolina to its end at Gauley Bridge in West Virginia.
World’s fair exhibit at Spencer Library takes viewers back in time
July 8, 2001
By Roger Martin It’s 1851. You’re in London, strolling along a grand hallway in a building made largely of glass almost a million square feet of it. The glass is held in place by 4,000 tons of iron and 202 miles of wooden bars. At one point, this house of glass vaults upward more than 100 feet, enough to accommodate some full-grown elm trees.
Cottonwood pops cork on wine festival, hopes to raise $45,000
July 8, 2001
By Jan Biles Cottonwood Inc. is using a “swirl, sniff and sip” strategy to raise money. Next weekend, the third annual “Salute! A Festival of Wine and Food” offers area residents an opportunity to sample some of 250 wines from the world’s leading vineyards, meet vintner Sean Sullivan, taste food from 10 Lawrence restaurants and participate in silent and live auctions.
Portraits of the Pawnee
Haskell alumnus paints historical Indian figures
July 8, 2001
By Jan Biles Nearly every image Rusty Diamond paints keeps a bit of his tribal heritage alive. He painstakingly researches his subjects, making sure every detail adheres to the traditions and history of the Pawnee. Take “Fancy Eagle,” a portrait of a Pawnee doctor who had the power to cure people by spraying water from his mouth onto their bodies.
Planning helps keep the peace during family vacations
July 8, 2001
The oldest daughter misses her boyfriend, the middle child won’t sit still and the baby can’t stand being strapped into the car safety seat and your trip hasn’t even started yet. All across the country, families are packing up and heading out on their summer vacations, but so much “togetherness” can cause problems, leading both parents and children to dread the trip.
Hair colors and attitudes lighten up for summer
July 8, 2001
The summer is about all things golden. Golden sun, golden tan, golden hair. Natural blondes go lighter, and everyone else strives for their dyed locks to look “naturally sun-kissed.” “Blonde has to be the most popular hair color in the summer,” says Clancey Callaway, head of hair technology for Vidal Sassoon North America.
Custody battle rages in Mitchard’s novel
July 8, 2001
Jacquelyn Mitchard’s new novel, “A Theory of Relativity” (HarperCollins, 351 pages, $26), introduces a fatal car crash, an orphaned child and the makings of a brutal custody battle, all within the first few pages. And the book doesn’t end until every heartstring has been tugged, bad things happen to good people, and everybody learns something in the process.
When it comes to the market, what do rich people do? Diversify
July 8, 2001
Most of us don’t spend much time worrying about the problems of the rich. Those folks can take care of themselves. But suppose we learned the rich were in a financial panic and pouring all their money into gold bars and buying one-way tickets to offshore tax havens? Wouldn’t that be something we should worry about?
Drive the message home for $250 a month
July 8, 2001
Hate traffic jams, you say? Maybe you just haven’t seen the entrepreneurial opportunities in congestion. Daniel Shifrin has. Shifrin, 32, is president of Autowraps, a San Francisco-based company that pays people to wrap their cars in advertising. It recently brought its ads for client PowerBar to Seattle, home to some of the worst traffic in the nation.
New economy of ins, outs
Values hot, stock options not as dot-coms fail
July 8, 2001
Still nattering on about the “New Economy” or your dream dot-com job that comes with a lifetime supply of khaki pants and a slathering of stock options? Here’s a hint: Throw in a couple of phrases like “hepcat” or “bees’ knees,” and you will be well on your way to letting everyone see the “dated material” stamp inked faintly on your forehead.
Trips to 4-H fields made for baseball, not scenery
July 8, 2001
By Chuck Woodling Nobody journeys to the Douglas County 4-H Fairgrounds on a summer evening for the scenery. Intruding into the Eastern sky like a rusting erector set are the tangled steel pipes of the dormant Farmland Industries plant. Off to the north in a draw sits an automobile junkyard.
Astros stretch Royals’ skid to six - Astros 10, Royals 8
July 8, 2001
Jeff Bagwell tied a club record with seven RBIs as the Houston Astros beat the Kansas City Royals, 10-8, on Saturday night. Bagwell went 3-for-5 with a home run and two doubles for the Astros, who scored four runs in each of the first two innings and won for the 10th time in their last 13 games.
Fireworks aftermath
July 8, 2001
Journal-World Editorial Fireworks on the Fourth of July are as American as mom and apple pie, but does this traditional celebration create too many hazards and headaches? When people think of the Fourth of July, they think of fireworks. They are a fun and spectacular way to celebrate America’s independence.
Nation Briefs
July 8, 2001
South Carolina: Beach resort town struck by tornado SEATTLE: Mayor assaulted in face at community celebration LOS ANGELES: Criminal defense attorney found dead in cemetery Florida: Surgeons reattach boy’s arm after shark attack in gulf
U.N. seeks to fight illegal small-arms trade
July 8, 2001
The United Nations is holding its first international conference on the illegal trade of small arms, used in 90 percent of the world’s conflicts and the biggest global killer apart from AIDS.