Archive for Friday, July 6, 2001

All stories

Sherrer says he will not run for governor
Lieutenant governor bows out, backs U.S. Rep. Jerry Moran
July 6, 2001
(Updated Friday at 12:54 p.m.) Lt. Gov. Gary Sherrer said Friday he won’t run for Kansas governor next year, then urged U.S. Rep. Jerry Moran to make the race.
Nation Briefs
July 6, 2001
Florida: Jeb Bush files for re-election Washington, D.C.: Disabled owed settlements Iowa: Powerball jackpot rises
Counterfeit cash hits businesses
July 6, 2001
By Mike Belt Merchants might want to take a close look at the next $100 bill they receive over the counter. Four times in the past few days counterfeit $100 bills have been passed during over-the-counter transactions at businesses, Lawrence Police spokesman Sgt. Mike Pattrick said.
Religion Briefs
July 6, 2001
Lone Star church offers Pork ‘n’ Pie Festival Trinity forum studies ‘Faces of Jesus’ Martha and Mary’s schedules prayer times Mustard Seed offers ‘Life Training School’ Lawrence Heights continues series Churches sponsor summer camp Clinton Parkway plans ‘Fabulous Wednesdays’ Cornerstone Baptist offers Bible school Catholic counseling available for couples Calvary schedules water baptism Mormon missionaries to share experiences
Census reflects changes in ‘traditional’ family
July 6, 2001
What do you think the Census 2000 figures mean for the two-parent family? The long-awaited report from the U.S. Census Bureau was released May 15, reflecting population trends and living patterns during the 10-year period ending in the year 2000
Investors have faith in a higher power
Some financial planners offer mutual funds that match religious values
July 6, 2001
At first glance, the office of Daniel Marbell Jr. resembles that of any other financial planner. Investment books and money magazines line his shelves. Real-time stock quotes run across his computer screen.
Sacred soul-searching
Thousands are turning to Christian counselors
July 6, 2001
Some say ghosts don’t exist. But Terri Tizzard Ryan has lived with phantoms most of her life. Raised in an alcoholic home, she was haunted by insecurity and tainted feelings about her father. For a while she bottled up the whispering spirits. Two years into her marriage, the ghosts took up noisy residence in her relationship.
Leslie lifts L.A.
July 6, 2001
Lisa Leslie had 23 points and 15 rebounds her eighth double-double in 15 games as the Los Angeles Sparks defeated the Phoenix Mercury 73-50 Thursday night. The Sparks improved to 7-0 at Staples Center in front of 6,915 the smallest crowd of the season. Despite their winning ways, attendance has declined at each of the team’s last four home games.
Williams primed for Wimbledon final
July 6, 2001
One singles title at Wimbledon isn’t enough for Venus Williams. “I’ve got to keep getting more,” said Williams, the defending champion, who defeated 1999 winner Lindsay Davenport 6-2, 6-7 (1), 6-1 on Thursday to reach the final against Justine Henin.
Floyd, Valentine in All-Star argument
July 6, 2001
Cliff Floyd won’t have a problem flying to Seattle if he wants to confront Bobby Valentine in person about being snubbed for the All-Star Game. Floyd was so certain he would make the team after talking to Valentine that he bought nearly $16,000 worth of plane tickets.
Bob Glass: 6Sports Athlete of the Week
July 6, 2001
Bob Glass, Lawrences own PBA bowler has been gone for two months for tournaments throughout the US. He’s home for another month and will be on his way again.
American League Roundup: Sox rally against Rocker
Cleveland wastes Colon’s effort in 5-4 loss to Boston
July 6, 2001
John Rocker’s musical accompaniment was painfully prophetic. Moments after storming from the Indians’ bullpen with The Scorpions’ “Rock You Like a Hurricane” blaring through the Jacobs Field sound system, Rocker blew one all right.
NBC to provide ‘total access’ for Pepsi 400 viewers
July 6, 2001
When NBC broadcasts its first Pepsi 400 on Saturday night at 7, what can viewers expect? “A lot of fun,” according to play-by-play man Allen Bestwick. “We have found some extraordinary chemistry with this group,” he said. “We are so ready to go to work it’s not even funny.”
Bonuses down for stars
July 6, 2001
Baseball owners finally saved some money this year: All-Star bonuses were down. Players will receive $1,875,000 in bonuses for getting picked to play in Tuesday’s game at Seattle, according to a survey of their contracts by The Associated Press. That’s down from $2,035,000 last year.
McGwire considers retiring
St. Louis slugger ‘embarrassed’
July 6, 2001
St. Louis Cardinals slugger Mark McGwire, baseball’s single season home-run king who is stuck in a career worst 0-for-29 slump, is thinking about retiring at the end of the season, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported in its Friday editions.
6Sports report: Gogel in the Western Open
July 6, 2001
Kevin Romary reports on former Jayhawk Matt Gogel and his Western Open performance.
Friends and neighbors
July 6, 2001
Sweeney thrilled by selection
July 6, 2001
Mike Sweeney’s strong summer just keeps getting better. Snubbed in the All-Star voting by Major League Baseball fans, the Kansas City Royals’ first baseman was chosen by Yankees manager Joe Torre as a reserve for the American League squad.
Henin sends Capriati packing
Williams decks Davenport to reach tournament final
July 6, 2001
Discussing the end of her Grand Slam winning streak, Jennifer Capriati shrugged, smiled and summed it up: “Oh, well.” The latest chapter in her career comeback was a setback in the Wimbledon semifinals, but also a reflection of lessons learned. Emotional meltdowns in response to losing are now part of her past.
Tigers complete sweep of Royals -Tigers 7, Royals 1
July 6, 2001
Steve Sparks’ knuckleballs rarely register more than 75 mph on the radar gun. Still, the fluttering pitches can be just as effective as the hardest fastballs. Sparks allowed five hits in eight innings, and Damion Easley hit a two-run triple as Detroit beat Kansas City, 7-1, Thursday night for a three-game sweep of the Royals.
KU grad in IRL fast lane
Galles plans to place Jayhawk decal on Unser’s car
July 6, 2001
By Andrew Hartsock Al Unser Jr. doesn’t have the foggiest idea what a Jayhawk is, but Unser vowed to do his best to put the mythical bird in the Kansas Speedway winner’s circle. Unser, a two-time Indianapolis 500 champion, drives in the Indy Racing League for Galles Racing.
Gibbs drops another Busch team
July 6, 2001
Joe Gibbs Racing has dropped its second Busch Series team after failing to secure a sponsor, leaving Jeff Purvis without a ride. “This was obviously a decision we hoped we would never have to make,” said team president J.D. Gibbs.
KC Zoo pioneers ultrasound technique on elephant
July 6, 2001
To the untrained eye, the wiggling white blur on the ultrasound monitor doesn’t look like much. But Dr. Kirk Suedmeyer sees an African elephant and much more. He sees recognition for the Kansas City Zoo, which officials believe is the first anywhere to capture images of a fetus throughout an elephant pregnancy with regular ultrasounds.
Rural counties to fight increasing meth labs
July 6, 2001
Authorities in central Kansas are ready to start drug task forces to combat a worsening problem with meth labs. Rice County Sheriff Steve Bundy proposed the task force to Rice County Commissioners this week after raids on three clandestine methamphetamine labs within a week.
Flag linked to Lincoln discovered
July 6, 2001
A flag that adorned Abraham Lincoln’s box at Ford’s Theater the night he was assassinated and may have been the banner that caused John Wilkes Booth to break his leg has been discovered in a dusty corner of the Connecticut Historical Society.
Iraq works out deal to resume oil exports
July 6, 2001
Iraq will resume oil exports after a monthlong halt, and has accepted the terms of a new Security Council resolution extending the U.N. oil-for-food program, Iraq’s U.N. ambassador said Thursday.
Typhoon unleashes deadly mudslide
July 6, 2001
Typhoon Utor on Thursday swirled over southern Taiwan and the northern Philippines killing 37, flooding homes, triggering mudslides and stranding hikers before barreling toward China.
Two hundred suspected witches killed in Congo villages
July 6, 2001
Villagers have hacked to death about 200 suspected witches in rebel-held northeastern Congo since June 15, blaming them for diseases that have gone untreated since Congo’s war broke out three years ago, a senior Ugandan army official said Thursday.
Law enforcement profits from drug forfeitures
Dealers inadvertently finance criminal investigations
July 6, 2001
Drug dealers are indirectly supporting the effort to catch other drug dealers, thanks to forfeiture laws. The Wichita Police Department’s narcotics seizure fund has grown from about $60,000 more than 10 years ago to about $800,000 even reaching $1 million at times.
Region Briefs
July 6, 2001
OLATHE: City’s fireworks finale comes at show’s start KANSAS CITY, Mo.: Kansas Citian cooks up Fourth of July trouble KANSAS CITY, Mo.: Texan loses life in I-29 accident CHAPMAN: Van rolls off highway; prep athletes injured
National League Roundup: Maddux keeps heat on Phillies
July 6, 2001
After earning his 250th career win, Greg Maddux isn’t looking past No. 251. “As soon as I quit, I’ll think about all I’ve accomplished,” Maddux said. “It’ll sink in at some point. Right now, we’re in a pennant race. We kind of needed to win this one.”
Amtrak looks down the line
Railway seeks new sources of revenue
July 6, 2001
Amtrak is branching out in pursuit of new income to stay in business from souvenirs to cell phone service, real estate development to express package delivery. In fact, the national railway now gets 43 percent of its revenue from nonpassenger business, up from 29 percent in 1990.
Grant to fund care-home presentations
July 6, 2001
Lawrence-based Kansas Advocates for Better Care, with the help of a state grant, will visit 12 nursing homes across Kansas to give presentations on compassionate care. The presentations, open to staff members and interested members of the public, will focus on legal definitions and symptoms of abuse, neglect and exploitation; risk factors of stress; and communication techniques for cognitively-impaired residents.
Tobacco, horse-racing interests push their messages late in session
July 6, 2001
A large tobacco company and a horse racing group together spent more than $17,000 on communications and media advertising in lobbying the Legislature in April, as members were trying to finish their business for the year.
Daily Ticker
July 6, 2001
Business profile: Chiropractor relocates firm’s Lawrence office
July 6, 2001
Stevenson to be arraigned
July 6, 2001
Utah Jazz rookie DeShawn Stevenson is scheduled to be arraigned on statutory rape charges today after allegedly admitting he had sex with a 14-year-old girl. Stevenson, a 6-foot-5 backup guard who went into the NBA from high school, faces up to three years in state prison if convicted of the felony.
Math error cuts May spending total
July 6, 2001
Commerce Department economists made a math error that overstated the amount of consumer spending in May, officials said Thursday. Consumer spending, a key force keeping the economy afloat, actually rose by 0.3 percent in May not by the 0.5 percent the government had reported Monday.
Lilly discloses Prozac patient names
Human programming error’ stirs fears about using Internet
July 6, 2001
New fears about the online security of private information were stirred Thursday when Eli Lilly and Co. said it inadvertently had released the e-mail addresses of more than 600 people on Prozac.
Phone companies to disclose long-distance information
Law requires firms to inform customers about services, policies
July 6, 2001
Millions of Americans are getting notices in the mail that aim to clear up one of the murkiest areas of modern telecommunications: long-distance rates. For the first time, telephone companies must give all consumers a way to find out exactly what they are paying to dial friends and family in other states. Long-distance carriers also must warn people of rate increases or other changes.
Vie Johnson
July 6, 2001
Will Chrisman
July 6, 2001
Norman Denton
July 6, 2001
Lorenz Fischer
July 6, 2001
Lawsuit sets stage for clash over religion
July 6, 2001
A group that includes 21 state lawmakers filed a federal lawsuit Thursday seeking to block performances of a college play featuring a gay Christ-like character. The lawsuit contends that the play, “Corpus Christi,” attacks religion and taxpayer money should not subsidize its production at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne.
Twain’s writing challenge finally gets a taker
For 125 years, authors have refused to match wits in literary contest
July 6, 2001
Mark Twain made a deal with the editor of The Atlantic Monthly more than a century ago: He would write a story, then ask other well-known authors to compose their own versions from the same outline.
Bicyclists on a mission bend Bush’s ear
July 6, 2001
By Matt Merkel-Hess Two recent Kansas University graduates who rode their bicycles across the country had a chance encounter earlier this week with President Bush. The recent grads, David Dearth and Bobby Nichols, along with support driver Katie Laurie, made the journey to commemorate their friend Casey Beaver, a KU student who was killed by a drunken driver in August 2000. Casey’s brother, Aaron, 18, of Atchison, joined the group after they passed through Kansas.
Water facts now at your fingertips
July 6, 2001
A new monitoring system for the Kansas River and several other waterways will allow Kansans to keep tabs on the conditions of their rivers, creeks and lakes. The U.S. Geological Survey’s Real-Time Water-Quality Notification System uses state-of-the-art equipment to collect a variety of data from 11 locations around the state.
Kansas well-represented at Nashville conference
July 6, 2001
By Joel Mathis The merger of two large Mennonite denominations should clear up any questions about the identity of a Lawrence congregation. Peace Mennonite Church, which meets at Ecumenical Christian Ministries, is affiliated with both the Mennonite Church and the General Conference Mennonite Church. Now it will be part of the new Mennonite Church USA.
Merger gets Mennonites’ blessing
July 6, 2001
The nation’s two largest Mennonite denominations approved a merger Thursday, concluding nearly two decades of negotiations. The merger of the Mennonite Church based in Elkhart, Ind., and the General Conference Mennonite Church based in Newton, Kan., creates the new Mennonite Church USA, with 125,000 members.
Big Bertha’ inventor dies
Callaway credited with revolutionizing golf
July 6, 2001
Ely Callaway, a daring former textiles executive who revolutionized golf for pros and duffers alike with oversized metal clubs and in the process built an $840 million company while in his 70s, died Thursday. He was 82.
Clinton seeking a new role
July 6, 2001
By Carl P. Leubsdorf Dallas Morning News For years after Richard Nixon was forced from the White House, supporters circulated buttons proclaiming him as “tanned, rested and ready” and hinting of a political comeback. Mr. Nixon never did, and Bill Clinton probably won’t, either. After all, when you can’t run for president anymore, all else pales in comparison.
Column refuted
July 6, 2001
Change of scene
July 6, 2001
Wedding rerun worth every penny
July 6, 2001
By Leonard Pitts Jr. Miami Herald “When we get married, we’ll have a big celebration.” The Intruders. Guess what I did on my summer vacation? I went and got married.
We love, hate our cell phones
July 6, 2001
By Ellen Goodman The Boston Globe Last week I moved out of my old car. I use the word “move” advisedly since, to be frank, I use my car as a pocketbook, file cabinet and shopping cart. After nine years of hard living in this second home, I should have called United Van Lines to empty it out.
Targeted training
July 6, 2001
Journal-World Editorial A coordinated network of vocational-technical schools that prepare Kansas students for specific jobs would serve both the students and the state. In the two years since the state’s higher education system was united under the Kansas Board of Regents, much attention has been focused on state universities and community colleges.
Old home town - 100 years ago today
July 6, 2001
Bush taps prosecutor to lead FBI
July 6, 2001
President Bush named veteran prosecutor Robert Mueller to take over the FBI and begin repairing the nation’s premier law enforcement agency after embarrassments ranging from bungled Oklahoma City bombing documents to the discovery of an FBI spy.
World must face AIDS crisis
July 6, 2001
By E.R. Shipp New York Daily News It was the least they could do, these representatives from more than 150 nations who gathered at the United Nations last week to discuss the worldwide AIDS pandemic. And, given the circumstances of their great differences over approach, over religious ideology, even over the roles of women in their societies, it was the best they could do when they agreed upon a 103-point Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS.
Bike Ride/President meeting
July 6, 2001
mmhess@ljworld.com More: www.kansite.com/casey/Pres.htm
Pine baby born July 4
July 6, 2001
spaterik@ljworld.com The Pine family is in the business of selling fireworks, but this Fourth of July they got a “little firecracker” that won’t be for sale.
Grant to fund care home presentations
July 6, 2001
J-W Staff Reports Lawrence-based Kansas Advocates for Better Care, with the help of a state grant, will visit 12 nursing homes across Kansas to give presentations on compassionate care .
t surf
July 6, 2001
jmathis@ljworld.com Nashville, Tenn. — The merger of two large Mennonite denominations should clear up any questions about the identity of a Lawrence congregation.
s close
July 6, 2001
Local markets As of Thursday’s close, courtesy of Ottawa Cooperative Assn. Ottawa Elevator — Wheat, $2.64; corn, $1.70; milo, $1.60; soybeans, $4.68. Edgerton Elevator — Wheat, $2.67; corn, $1.70; milo, $1.60; soybeans, $4.70. Overbrook Elevator — Wheat, $2.67; corn, $1.70; milo, $1.60; soybeans, $4.68. Midland Elevator — Wheat, NA; corn, $1.70; milo, $1.60; soybeans, $4.68. North Lawrence Elevator — Wheat, NA; corn, $1.70; milo, $1.60; soybeans, $4.68.
BUSINESS PROFILE Chiropractor relocates Lawrence office
July 6, 2001
J-W Staff Reports Company: Spine & Joint Therapy Center, 3109 W. Sixth St., Suite A, Lawrence; 101 W. 10th St., Eudora.
Soundoff on portable sign
July 6, 2001
Is it illegal for the 23rd Street McDonald’s to have that traveling marquee sign? City Manager Mike Wildgen said: “The 23rd McDonald’s has applied for and received a temporary sign permit for their sign. It expires July 12.”
Businesses receiving counterfeit bills
July 6, 2001
mbelt@ljworld.com Merchants might want to take a close look at the next $100 bill they receive over the counter.
7-8 Jack Parker obituary
July 6, 2001
Jack Parker No services are planned for Jack C. Parker, 67, Boise, Idaho. He has been cremated.
Vie Johnson obituary
July 6, 2001
Vie Johnson Topeka — Services for Vie “Della” Johnson, 88, Topeka, will be 10 a.m. Saturday at Bowser Johnson Funeral Chapel, Topeka. Burial will be in Topeka Cemetery.
Lawrence Sprint employees tackle hunger
July 6, 2001
Employees of the Lawrence Sprint PCS Customer Solutions Contact Center have been doing more than solving customer questions on the job. From May 13 to June 1, the employees participated for the first time in Sprint’s “Let’s Tackle Hunger” program. They — 400 employees — collected more than 7,000 food items in under three weeks.
s close
July 6, 2001
Dow Industrials —91.25, 10,479.86
Local briefs
July 6, 2001
Area reservoir levels approaching near normal Clinton and Perry lakes have returned almost to normal after June thunderstorms inundated Northeast Kansas with floodwaters. Clinton Lake, above, was just over 877 feet above sea level Thursday morning, said Kipp Walters, a park ranger with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The target height for the lake is 875.5. After releasing as much as 1,500 cubic feet of water per second into the Wakarusa River, the outflow has been cut to 500 cubic feet per second, Walters said. Perry Lake peaked June 22 at 908.5 feet above sea level but is now just below 892 feet. The target level for the lake is 891.5 feet. In June, as much as 12,000 cubic feet of water per second was dumped into the Delaware River, which feeds from Perry Lake to the Kansas River. The outflow now has been cut to 300 cubic feet per second. __________________________ Police: Fireworks lead to fight An apparent disagreement early Independence Day regarding fireworks sent one Lawrence man to the hospital and another to jail. About 1:20 a.m. Wednesday, Lawrence Police arrived in the 1000 block of Rhode Island Street and found a man bleeding from a cut to the head, Sgt. Mike Pattrick said. Police said the man apparently was hit with a crowbar during a fight with the suspect and another man. The victim reportedly came outside and confronted two men after some fireworks were set off, Pattrick said. Police arrested the suspect and booked him in to the Douglas County Jail for aggravated battery and battery. Thursday, he remained in jail without bond pending the filing of formal charges. The victim was taken by a friend to seek medical treatment, Pattrick said. __________________________ Art: Herd work near KCI heralds wonders of grain A five-acre earthwork by Lawrence artist Stan Herd will be unveiled next week near Kansas City International Airport. Featuring a pyramid and the tip of a wheat stalk, the work is intended to celebrate wheat harvest and remind consumers to eat more grain foods for energy. The work includes the phrase “Grains: Harvest the Energy.” For more than 20 years, Herd has worked the earth using indigenous materials to create images both artistic and commercial. From 160-acre plowed portraits to smaller stone designs, his work has become well-known around the world. Recently, he has been creating earthworks in Cuba to commemorate poet and Cuban patriot Jose Marti. __________________________ Gasoline prices: Pump patrol tracks down lowest prices in Lawrence The Journal-World has found a Lawrence-area gasoline price as low as $1.129 a gallon at Kwik Shop, East 23rd and Harper streets. If you find a lower price, please call us at 832-7154. Be prepared to leave the name of the business, the address and the price. Or go to www.ljworld .com/section/gasoline to join our Pump Patrol message board. __________________________ Lawrence Police arrest pair, confiscate crack, money Lawrence Police confiscated crack cocaine and arrested two people after a car stop Monday in North Lawrence, police Sgt. Mike Pattrick said Thursday. The car was stopped about 8:30 p.m. in the 1000 block of North Third Street by a patrol officer who had reason to suspect drug activity, Pattrick said. He declined to elaborate. In addition to the crack cocaine, the officer confiscated $769 in cash and two cell phones, Pattrick said. He would not say how much crack cocaine was found. Taken to the Douglas County Jail were a 30-year-old Kansas City, Mo., woman and a 49-year-old Lawrence man. The two were booked into the Douglas County Jail on suspicion of possession of crack cocaine but later released without bonds, a jail official said. Charges are pending.
Agassi to meet Rafter again
July 6, 2001
Four men, each with a compelling story and each with the portfolio of a champion, take the court this afternoon to begin the final drive to the Wimbledon title. Andre Agassi, at 31 playing the greatest tennis of his life, faces Patrick Rafter, last year’s runner-up, for the third year in a row in a Wimbledon semi.
Quick, name defending Winston Cup champion
July 6, 2001
With the Winston Cup series moving to Daytona for Saturday night’s Pepsi 400, it’s time to file the annual midseason report. Biggest Story: Dale Earnhardt’s death in a last-lap crash at the Daytona 500. Racing people still are trying to cope with the loss of the seven-time Winston Cup champion.
EU will lift visa restrictions to allow Milosevic’s wife to visit
July 6, 2001
Slobodan Milosevic’s wife can visit her husband at a Netherlands prison despite being on a list of Yugoslavs banned from traveling to European Union nations, an EU spokesman said Thursday.
Kohl’s wife’s suicide blamed on ill health
July 6, 2001
Hannelore Kohl, the wife who stood by Helmut Kohl during a long political career that peaked when he became German chancellor, committed suicide out of despair at a painful allergy that forced her to avoid daylight, Kohl’s office said Thursday. She was 68.
Elephant relocation effort a jumbo undertaking
July 6, 2001
Mzee is 42, headstrong and notorious for crashing through the electrified fence that surrounds a sprawling ranch in north central Kenya.
Safety data on tires hard to sort
July 6, 2001
The government has five-star rating systems to determine how vehicles hold up in crashes and how likely they are to roll over. Consumers looking for similar guidance on tires will come up empty because there is no standard to determine which tires are safe and which might fail.
Area briefs
July 6, 2001
Gunshots interrupt group’s lake outing Congressman to speak today at chamber event SBA to loan funds to disaster victims Baldwin road project to close intersection
Marriage Licenses
July 6, 2001
Douglas County District Court Marriage licenses issued
Business briefcase for Friday
July 6, 2001
HOTEL SpringHill Suites opens
Blotter
July 6, 2001
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
s four
July 6, 2001
What do you think could be done to improve next year’s Fourth of July celebration?
First wife’s effort to crash vacation deserves rebuke
July 6, 2001
Horoscopes
July 6, 2001
World Briefs
July 6, 2001
Turkey: Death toll reaches 27 in prison hunger strike Germany: Hotel being built at Hitler’s retreat Switzerland: Nurse for elderly admits to 9 killings
Police question congressman’s wife on missing intern
July 6, 2001
The wife of Rep. Gary Condit was questioned by law enforcement officers Thursday in the disappearance of former federal intern Chandra Levy, according to the congressman’s lawyer.
Drinking among teens remains widespread
Majority of underage drinkers, however, support laws that set legal age at 21
July 6, 2001
Two-thirds of Americans both adults and teen-agers say they support the legal drinking age of 21, says an Associated Press poll. Teen-agers support the law even though teen drinking remains widespread.
Can ‘Survivor’ survive bad hype?
Television’s top-rated show threatened by rumors of impropriety
July 6, 2001
Ever since Tina Wesson won the second million-dollar jackpot in May, “Survivor” seems to have lost the immunity idol. A nagging sense that all is not how it seems on the hit reality show has followed the news that “Survivor” executive producer Mark Burnett staged some scenes and may have tried to influence the first game’s outcome.
Armstrong hopes for drug-free Tour
Texan launches bid for third consecutive crown in Paris
July 6, 2001
Lance Armstrong knows this year’s Tour de France will be tough. He just hopes it will be clean, too. On Saturday, the 30-year-old Texan launches his bid for a third consecutive title in the world’s toughest cycling race at a time when doping has once again cast a shadow over the sport.
Survey reveals Islam’s growth
July 6, 2001
Mosques in America are generally places with a growing community of believers that have a vital spiritual life and offer social services to the faithful so says the leader of the first comprehensive survey of Islam in the United States.
NCAA, ESPN reach deal
July 6, 2001
The NCAA women’s basketball tournament will get more airtime and might see scheduling changes under a $200 million, 11-year TV rights deal with ESPN announced Thursday. The expiring NCAA-ESPN contract was for $19 million over seven years.
Tragedy fresh for drivers
NASCAR returns to site of Earnhardt’s death
July 6, 2001
The ride through the tunnel wasn’t so tough for Rusty Wallace. The first lap around the racetrack was different. For the first time since Dale Earnhardt died, Wallace and the rest of the NASCAR drivers returned to Daytona Beach on Thursday, each coming face to face with their own mortality in a sport with a thin margin for error.
Macedonia calls cease-fire
July 6, 2001
Macedonian leaders and ethnic Albanian rebels agreed Thursday to an open-ended cease-fire, clearing the way for NATO troops to disarm the rebels and take steps to ensure a four-month insurgency does not engulf this Balkan nation in civil war.
Kansans defend their flag
Nationwide polling of experts rates Sunflower State’s banner fifth worst in the nation
July 6, 2001
Secretary of State Ron Thornburgh doesn’t agree with a group of flag experts who say Kansas has one of the worst flags in the nation. In a poll conducted the past three months on the Internet, members of the North American Vexillological Assn. made up mostly of people who study flags said Kansas had one of the five worst flags in the nation.
Jobless claims back on increase
July 6, 2001
New claims for state unemployment insurance rose last week, fresh evidence that some workers are having trouble holding onto their jobs in a weak economy. The number of workers filing new applications for jobless benefits increased by a seasonally adjusted 7,000 to 399,000 for the week ending June 30, the Labor Department reported Thursday.
Japanese police question suspect in Okinawa rape
July 6, 2001
A U.S. Air Force sergeant suspected of raping a Japanese woman on the island of Okinawa was questioned today at a police station, but the U.S. ambassador said talks on his arrest were still under way. Police believe Timothy Woodland, a 24-year-old staff sergeant stationed at Okinawa’s Kadena Air Base, raped a 20-year-old Okinawan woman June 29 in a parking lot outside a row of trendy bars in Chatan town.
Lakes update
July 6, 2001
Area reservoir levels approaching near normal
Births
July 6, 2001
* Tracy and Chris Grammer, Lawrence, a girl, Wednesday. * Marc and Jennifer Pine, Tonganoxie, a boy, Wednesday.
Marriage Licenses
July 6, 2001
Business Briefcase
July 6, 2001
Hotel: SpringHill Suites opens downtown along river Internet: Microsoft to mend its Messenger problems Advanced Micro Devices: Sales decrease prompts chip maker’s warning Technology: EMC earnings to miss Wall Street: Warnings hurt markets
Stem cell research shows drawbacks to current cloning methods
July 6, 2001
Researchers have found serious abnormalities in cloned mice, a finding that strengthens the belief of many scientists that the technique used to clone Dolly the sheep should not be used on humans.
People
July 6, 2001
‘Soprano’ teen denies crime Establishing links Aging gracefully Bad vibrations
KU grad in IRL fast lane
July 6, 2001
ahartsock@ljworld.com Kansas City, Kan. — Al Unser Jr. doesn’t have the foggiest idea what a Jayhawk is, but Unser vowed to do his best to put the mythical bird in the Kansas Speedway winner’s circle.
Museum reveals spy history
July 6, 2001
Before Gen. George Washington crossed the Delaware River and sealed the promise of the Declaration of Independence, he heard from his personal spy that the Hessian force in Trenton, N.J., would be a pushover.
Derby winner injured
July 6, 2001
Kentucky Derby winner Monarchos has a fractured bone in his right knee and could be out of training for up to 60 days. The injury was disclosed Thursday by trainer John Ward, who said the 3-year-old colt might still be able to race in the Breeders’ Cup at Belmont Park on Oct. 27.
Moore to unveil water quality system
July 6, 2001
Demonstration today An online water-quality surveying system will be demonstrated at 10:30 a.m. today in DeSoto.
Ryun at chamber luncheon
July 6, 2001
Congressman to speak today at chamber event
Friday datebook
July 6, 2001
TODAY 8 a.m.-4 p.m.: Jefferson County Health Department immunization, blood pressure and family planning clinic, 1212 Walnut, U.S. Highway 59, Oskaloosa, (785) 863-2447, www.jfcountyks.com/health_dept.
Nation Briefs
July 6, 2001
Pennsylvania: Trapped spelunker dies during rescue attempt Georgia: Disassembled spy plane arrives for repairs St. Louis: Tycoon readies balloon for global flight attempt New Jersey: Fire burns out on fireworks barge
On the record
July 6, 2001