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Archive for Tuesday, August 7, 2001

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Child rescued from river
Combined reports from Lawrence Journal-World and 6News
August 7, 2001
(Updated Wednesday at 9:29 a.m.) An 11-year-old boy had a pulse but wasn’t breathing on his own Tuesday evening when he was taken by helicopter to a Kansas City hospital after being submerged under the rushing waters of the Kansas River for 20 to 25 minutes, Lawrence-Douglas County Fire & Medical Deputy Chief Mark Bradford said.
KU’s Russell ready to take on world
KU senior hoping to reach finals in javelin
August 7, 2001
By Gary Bedore Scott Russell threw the javelin a Canadian and Kansas University record 263 feet to win the Canadian Track and Field title six weeks ago in Edmonton, Alberta. Russell, a Kansas University senior from Windsor, Ontario, will need to match or surpass that mark just to reach the finals at the World Championships on Friday at the same Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton.
Eugene Ewing Jr.
August 7, 2001
Israel should remain wary
August 7, 2001
By Cal Thomas Tribune Media Services On a recent visit to Washington, Uzi Landau, Israel’s minister for public security, predicted to me that another war would soon come to his country unless it “continues to show resolve and unity.” In fact, the war has never stopped since Israel’s founding 53 years ago. Between June 2, when Yasser Arafat announced a ceasefire, and Aug. 1, there were 961 attacks against Israelis (not counting rock or firebomb throwing), according to an Israel Defense Forces spokesperson.
Retailer has designs on TV fashion
Bergdorf Goodman a consultant for Academy of Television Arts & Sciences
August 7, 2001
Television has become one of the most influential sources of fashion trends. Walk down Main Street in Anytown, U.S.A., and you’ll see a Carrie (“Sex and the City”) wannabe or a Rachel (“Friends”) look-alike.
West Africa pageant sets different standard for beauty
August 7, 2001
Here’s how Isabelle Zisson Sina and fellow contestants got ready for the big West Africa beauty pageant: Rested. Did their hair.
Baker football: Wildcats lack experience at quarterback
August 7, 2001
By Chuck Woodling There’s one thing Baker University football coach John Frangoulis knows about his quarterbacks. Nary a one has ever taken a snap in a varsity game. “They’re young,” Frangoulis said, “but we feel we have some good ones.”
Hesitant starters bother sprinters
Runners livid following slew of false starts at World Championships in Edmonton
August 7, 2001
“On your marks. Set .” It all seems so simple. The person responsible for unleashing the speed of the world’s fastest humans says those four words, followed by a pistol shot.
Nation briefs
August 7, 2001
‘Star Wars’ movie’s name announced Shark attack costs swimmer his leg Senator wants review of identity theft guards Prosecutors drop charge against mayor
6Sports report: Kansas football recruits start training
August 7, 2001
Michael Rigg follows the newest football Jayhawks through their first practices.
Bush Medicaid plan cuts hole in safety net
August 7, 2001
President Bush’s plan for extending health insurance to more people may have a giant loophole: States can cut Medicaid benefits to certain people and may not have to use the savings to cover the uninsured.
Ripken rallies Orioles
Baltimore third baseman’s two-run double keys 9-6 win
August 7, 2001
Cal Ripken earned a standing ovation just for showing up and drew applause for helping beat the hometown team. Impending retirement and a sure Hall of Fame election will do that for a guy. Ripken capped a five-run fifth inning with a two-run double that helped the Baltimore Orioles beat the Kansas City Royals 9-6 Monday night but the crucial hits came earlier and later, manager Mike Hargrove said.
Clinton signs deal to publish memoirs
August 7, 2001
Ending months of speculation, former President Clinton said Monday that he will write his much sought-after memoirs for publisher Alfred A. Knopf. Terms were not disclosed, but he is expected to receive one of the biggest advances ever for a nonfiction book.
Cream may repair skin’s sun damage
August 7, 2001
The key to preventing skin cancer is protecting yourself from the sun, but too few people heed that advice: Skin cancer strikes more than 1 million Americans annually and is on the rise.
Remnants of Barry pelt southern states
August 7, 2001
Diminished but not dead, the remnants of Tropical Storm Barry on Monday swamped the state capital, the rest of the Florida Panhandle and much of the Southeast with seemingly ceaseless torrents of rain.
Inmate advises parents to talk to teens about drugs
August 7, 2001
Condit case spawns concerns and jokes about fidelity
August 7, 2001
The real reason Congress has roll call every morning, comedian Jay Leno joked, “is to see who’s back from the motel.”
Market optimism wanes on Intel news
August 7, 2001
Sullen investors sent stocks lower Monday, forcing the Dow Jones industrials down more than 100 points as Wall Street retreated from last week’s optimism about a recovery in the semiconductor industry. Uncertainty about the economy and earnings ruled the market after Salomon Smith Barney reduced its profit and revenue targets for Intel and Lehman Brothers said the chip maker would cut prices in half on its Pentium 4 processor. The news disturbed investors who last week bid chip stocks higher on bullish comments from other analysts and Intel itself.
Baldwin school bond to go on ballots
$7.89 million would build elementary building, provide district renovations
August 7, 2001
By Theresa Freed Baldwin school patrons will be asked in November to approve a $7.89 million bond issue to build and equip a new elementary school and provide renovations and additions to the district’s existing junior high and grade schools. The resolution setting the election was approved unanimously at a special meeting Monday morning by the Baldwin school board.
Legislators warned of rising medical costs
Caring for poor Kansans to get more expensive, SRS warns
August 7, 2001
Legislators cast a net Monday trying to get a fix on the rising cost of health care for poor Kansans.
Don’t ditch Election Day
August 7, 2001
By Larry Eichel The Philadelphia Inquirer If nothing else, the report of the private, bipartisan National Commission on Federal Election Reform has clarified the partisan divisions that make election reform a surprisingly contentious matter for Congress.
People
August 7, 2001
Cruz ignores the rumors Janet cancels again Kicking it up a notch Tommy’s house of fashion
Western begins appeals process
Company wants KCC to reconsider merger ruling
August 7, 2001
Western Resources Inc. filed a motion Monday asking state regulators to reconsider their decision not to allow the company’s planned restructuring. The Kansas Corporation Commission issued a decision July 20 rejecting Western’s planned restructuring, which would have transferred much of its debt to its two electric companies.
Edith Littles
August 7, 2001
World briefs
August 7, 2001
Iraqi crew rescued from sinking tanker Mother has baby at 60 Best-selling author Jorge Amado dies Court blocks Pinochet extradition to Argentina
Horoscopes
August 7, 2001
Lola Parrett
August 7, 2001
Briefcase
August 7, 2001
Interbrew $1.6 billion deal cheers 128-year-old Beck General Dynamics to boost offerings with Motorola deal Americans prospered with markets in ‘90s High Court to settle battle between FCC, NextWave
Area briefs
August 7, 2001
Fight, gunshot reports lead to 23-year-old’s arrest Two disturbances lead to 20-year-old’s arrest Suspect’s escape from police short-lived Golf tournament to benefit American Lung Assn.
Local briefs
August 7, 2001
Eudora police investigate vandalism at cemetery Eight tombstones in Eudora Cemetery were knocked over by vandals sometime Sunday night or early Monday morning, Eudora Police said. The vandalized tombstones, such as the one pictured above, were in four different sections of the cemetery, Police Cpl. Greg Neis said. No damage estimate was determined. The cemetery, about a quarter of a mile east of Eudora on East Seventh Street, is maintained by the city of Eudora. A city worker discovered the vandalism shortly after 8 a.m. Monday and called police. There are no suspects, Neis said. Some of the tombstones were broken in addition to being tipped over, Eudora City Clerk Donna Oleson said. Two cemetery section markers were also knocked over, she said. “It’s upsetting to have something like this happen, especially for the families,” Oleson said. __________ Crime: Suspect in beating jailed; victim in critical condition A Lawrence man was in jail Monday and the woman he was suspected of beating was in critical condition at Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kan., a hospital spokesman said. Charges are pending against the 32-year-old suspect. Lawrence Police were continuing to investigate the incident. Police were called to a domestic disturbance about 11:40 p.m. Sunday at a residence in the 300 block of Glenview Drive, Police Sgt. Mike Pattrick said. A man identified as a temporary house guest had called officers and awaited their arrival outside, Pattrick said. Inside the residence, officers found a 27-year-old woman unconscious and suffering from facial injuries, Pattrick said. The suspect, also found in the residence, was arrested. The woman was taken to Lawrence Memorial Hospital by Lawrence-Douglas County Fire & Medical. She then was flown by LifeFlight air ambulance to KUMC. The woman was awake and talking with investigators Monday afternoon, Pattrick said. The suspect is jailed without bond. __________ Foster care: -Democratic leaders weigh in on SRS payment’s rerouting Topeka State Democratic leaders Monday criticized Lt. Gov. Gary Sherrer’s involvement in a payment to a foster care contractor and called on Gov. Bill Graves to seek a bipartisan solution to problems with the privatized foster care system. The comments from Democrats came after the Journal-World reported Sunday that a $500,000 payment to United Methodist Youthville for foster care services was cut and instead given to the Salvation Army of Wichita after Sherrer had called state officials about the payment. Sherrer is a former president of the Salvation Army’s board. The Salvation Army is one of Youthville’s largest subcontractors and was owed the money by Youthville. “This is political cronyism at its worst and a classic example of the backroom deals that have hampered privatization from the beginning,” Senate Democratic Leader Anthony Hensley of Topeka said. Sherrer has denied exerting influence over the decision by the Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services to pay the Salvation Army instead of Youthville, which has filed for bankruptcy. __________ Gasoline costs: Pump patrol track down lowest prices in town The Lawrence Journal-World has found a gasoline price as low as $1.249 at numerous locations in Lawrence. If you find a lower price, please call us at 832-7154. Be prepared to leave the name and address of the business and the price. Or go to www.ljworld.com/section/gasoline to join our Pump Patrol message board.
6News report: LIG forum discusses traffic woes
August 7, 2001
Tina Terry reports on the Lawrence is Growing community forum devoted to figuring out Lawrence’s traffic problem. Finding a solution is proving quite frustrating.
6News report: New York Elementary goes back to school
August 7, 2001
Trish Ayers profiles the “Back to School” efforts of New York Elementary. The school year begins in nine days.
6Sports report: Collison big in Japan
August 7, 2001
James Sido reports on the international success of Nick Collison and the USA team in Japan.
6Sports report: soccer team nets transfer
August 7, 2001
James Sido reports on the transfer of former Nebraska Cornhusker Brooke Jones to KU. Jones is a former Olathe East standout.
NFL Camps Roundup: Vikings hold subdued workout
About 1,000 fans turn out for practice; Stringer’s family may keep results of autopsy private
August 7, 2001
Instead of a scrimmage in front of cheering fans, the Minnesota Vikings held a subdued workout on Monday while their coach led a delegation to the funeral of a fallen teammate.
Stringer buried in Vikings’ jersey
About 1,300 people pack church for lineman’s two-hour funeral service
August 7, 2001
With large pots of white calla lilies flanking his open black coffin, Korey Stringer was remembered Monday as a fun-loving, generous man who “never forgot anyone.” About 1,300 people packed the First Assembly of God church for the two-hour funeral of the Minnesota Vikings’ lineman who died of heatstroke last week.
American League Roundup: Damon decks Detroit
Athletics’ outfielder rips three-run homer in ninth
August 7, 2001
The Oakland Athletics know that if they want to get into the playoffs, they need to keep beating the teams that they are supposed to beat. Johnny Damon hit a tiebreaking three-run homer in the ninth inning to give the Athletics their first four-game sweep in Detroit in 46 years with a 6-3 win over the Tigers.
Frederick testified against gambling over summer
August 7, 2001
As chair of the NCAA Committee on Sportsmanship and Ethical Conduct, Bob Frederick recently testified before the House Financial Services committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.
Jones edged in 100 dash
Ukranian sprinter clocked in 10.82 to nudge American
August 7, 2001
Marion Jones flies out of the blocks with such speed and force that a race is usually hers from start to finish. On Monday night, a Ukrainian sprinter never let her pull away.
On the record
August 7, 2001
City check-outs on Thursday
August 7, 2001
Lawrence High and Free State High will check out football equipment on Thursday. At FSHS, seniors will receive their gear at 8 a.m., followed by juniors at 8:40 a.m. and sophomores at 9:30 a.m. Firebird coach Bob Lisher will hold a team meeting for all three classes at 9:15 a.m. Thursday.
Kansas gains transfer
August 7, 2001
Brooke Jones, a women’s soccer forward from Nebraska, has transferred to Kansas University, the Jayhawks announced Monday. Jones, who’s from Overland Park, is a junior and will have two seasons of eligibility remaining.
Simien ‘completely’ recovered
August 7, 2001
Kansas University men’s basketball signee Wayne Simien is 100 percent recovered from his April shoulder surgery. Simien’s mother, Margaret, said her 6-foot-9, 250-pound son has been lifting weights, working with a personal trainer, shooting, dunking and doing everything else on the court except playing in full-contact pick-up games.
Frederick’s new post won’t involve pay cut
August 7, 2001
Bob Frederick’s transition from Kansas University athletics director to teacher in the KU School of Education won’t be a blow to his pocketbook. Under terms of a five-year contract Frederick signed this summer, he’ll be earning the same salary as a teacher that he earned as athletics director $166,503 a year.
Bowen savors match made in Kansas
Former player enjoying new full-time position with Jayhawks, recent engagement to Miss Kansas
August 7, 2001
By Robert Sinclair Clint Bowen wasn’t planning on getting engaged on Friday night. “When I woke up that day,” he said, “I had no idea we were going to do it.” Bowen, Kansas University’s tight ends coach/special teams coordinator, went golfing with KU coach Terry Allen and running backs coach Jay Johnson on Friday. While the three coaches were playing and talking, a scheme began to take shape.
Nation briefs
August 7, 2001
Sen. Roberts recovering from colon surgery Report faults crew in crash of National Guard plane Coaster collision injures 22 Alleged smugglers held in jail
Booming rat population a growing problem in cities
August 7, 2001
In New York City, officials held a Rat Summit and appointed a rodent task force. Sightings of the furry critters in Chicago have shot up by more than 10,000. A Houston exterminator even witnessed a police officer with loaded pistol chasing a rat through a house.
Lawyers consider ethics changes
August 7, 2001
The nation’s largest lawyers’ group changed its ethics rules Monday to loosen the restrictions on when lawyers can report potentially life-threatening behavior by their clients.
Education costs calculated
August 7, 2001
While college students and their families may get a sinking feeling with every report of rising college costs, research is under way that aims at least to show students and families what colleges do with all that money.
SCLC focuses on reparations
August 7, 2001
The group founded by Martin Luther King Jr. at the dawn of the modern civil rights movement said Monday its agenda for a new century would include seeking reparations for slavery and ending racial profiling.
Labor unions’ political expenses questioned
August 7, 2001
Labor unions have spent millions of dollars of workers’ dues on election-year ads and get-out-the-vote drives while reporting no taxable political expenses to the IRS, a review of union and government documents shows.
Barbecue to kick off Free State football
August 7, 2001
The Lawrence Free State High School Booster Club will play host to the Fourth Annual Kick-Off Barbecue from 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Sunday at Lawrence Free State High School.
Smith services
August 7, 2001
O’Grady services
August 7, 2001
Barbara Parker
August 7, 2001
Campbell services
August 7, 2001
Charles Geboe Sr.
August 7, 2001
Costlier trash removal possible statewide
August 7, 2001
Testing to determine whether the city’s street-sweeping debris is contaminated with oil, pesticides and other chemicals could result in more expensive disposal costs not only in Wichita but statewide. “We had always assumed, probably wrongly, that street sweepings were uncontaminated,” said Bill Bider, director of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment’s bureau of waste management. “Now we are finding out that it has low levels of contamination.”
Discovery of remains heartens Kansans
Plane that went down over Laos included two with ties to Sunflower State
August 7, 2001
Sue Jenkins long ago accepted that her first husband died when the plane he was copiloting disappeared while making top-secret reconnaissance flights over Laos.
Kansas City FBI office gets new director
August 7, 2001
Violent crime and drugs are at the top of the list of concerns for Kevin L. Stafford, the new head of the FBI’s Kansas City operations.
Phasing out Band Day?
August 7, 2001
Faulty reasoning
August 7, 2001
Bank robbery trial delayed; plea possible
August 7, 2001
By Scott Rothschild The trial of a Lawrence man accused of trying to rob a downtown Lawrence bank has been postponed until Sept. 4 as attorneys try to negotiate a plea bargain. Paul David Lee’s trial in connection with the Nov. 30 attempted robbery at Firstar Bank, Ninth and Massachusetts streets, was scheduled to start Monday.
Hiroshima remembered
Coalition for Peace and Justice protests nuclear weapons threat
August 7, 2001
By Stephanie Paterik Bob Lewis was celebrating his first wedding anniversary when the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945. Louise Hanson was turning 5 years old.
Grievance filed for fired driver
Transit union alleges company harassed employees about organizing attempt
August 7, 2001
By Tim Carpenter A grievance filed on behalf of a fired Lawrence bus driver alleges MV Transportation tried to coerce workers into abandoning union-organizing efforts. Quentin Grandstaff was fired Monday afternoon, a representative of the Amalgamated Transit Union said.
Poetry Slam title brings loss for words
August 7, 2001
Mayda DelValle had just walked off stage at the Paramount Theatre with the national title for the spoken word. But she had no words left.
Palestinians refuse to arrest militants wanted by Israelis
August 7, 2001
Palestinian leaders on Monday rejected Israel’s demand to arrest seven “main terrorists,” and both sides issued warnings that hinted at more bloodshed in the Mideast crisis.
Builders keep busy
City values July permits at $10.8 million
August 7, 2001
By Mark Fagan Builders continued to stay busy during July in Lawrence, as they lined up a few high-dollar commercial projects and pushed construction of single-family homes ahead of last year’s pace. The city of Lawrence issued permits in July for $10.8 million of work, up 27 percent from $8.5 million a year earlier.
EchoStar enters DirecTV battle
August 7, 2001
EchoStar Communications Corp. made an unsolicited $32 billion bid to buy Hughes Electronics Corp., kicking off a potential bidding war with News Corp. for the DirecTV owner. The stock-for-stock swap offer comes only weeks after General Motors Corp., Hughes’ largest shareholder and corporate parent, nixed a previous offer from the Littleton, Colo.-based EchoStar. GM reportedly declined EchoStar’s original offer amid federal regulatory and antitrust concerns.
Battle against cancer forces Bolivia’s president to resign
August 7, 2001
His hands shaking and his voice quavering, President Hugo Banzer resigned from office Monday, saying his battle with cancer makes it impossible for him to govern South America’s poorest nation.
Peace agreement delayed in Macedonia
August 7, 2001
Negotiations on a peace agreement between the Macedonian government and ethnic Albanian rebels stalled Monday at least temporarily when the government insisted that the rebels must surrender their weapons to NATO peacekeepers and withdraw before a deal could proceed.
Accessibility test
August 7, 2001
SUV mileage loophole makes no sense
August 7, 2001
By Geneva Overholser Washington Post Writers Group You try to be moderate enough to reach the many when you’re writing a column, but moderation is sometimes unsuitable: There just isn’t an ounce of prudence or good sense in the House of Representatives’ inaction last week on gas-mileage standards. As you may have read, the House decided against closing something called the “SUV loophole.”
Financial train wreck
August 7, 2001
J-W Editorials The state’s adoption and foster care system may be doing a good job, but who’s paying the bills? When is there going to be some GOOD news about the state’s privatized foster care and adoption system?
Study: Multitasking wastes time all around
August 7, 2001
Scientists using sophisticated psychological tests and brain imaging technologies have reached this conclusion: It is hard to rub your stomach and pat your head at the same time.
Immigration fee hikes proposed
August 7, 2001
The Immigration and Naturalization Service plans to raise fees for immigrants for services ranging from fingerprinting to obtaining green cards.
Court shoots down gun liability
August 7, 2001
Keeping in step with courts around the country, the California Supreme Court ruled Monday that victims and families cannot sue gun manufacturers when the products are used illegally. The 5-1 decision overturned the nation’s only state appellate ruling allowing victims to sue a gunmaker for someone’s criminal acts. The ruling stemmed from a 1993 massacre of eight in a San Francisco skyscraper.
IRA disarmament offer seen as breakthrough
August 7, 2001
Going further than ever toward disarmament, the Irish Republican Army has agreed on a secret method for getting rid of its weapons but offered no commitment on when it would start, an independent commission announced Monday The governments of Britain and Ireland called it a breakthrough and urged leaders of Northern Ireland’s major Protestant party, the Ulster Unionists, to drop a threat to scuttle the province’s Catholic-Protestant administration this weekend.
Participants seeks ways to improve city’s traffic
Forum participants sound off
August 7, 2001
By Matt Merkel-Hess About midway through Monday night’s forum on traffic, Lester Marsh held up a book that summed up his thoughts on traffic. The title: “Divorce Your Car.”
Survey finds acceptance of high tuition
August 7, 2001
Bob Patterson, a 54-year-old lawyer who lives in Evanston, Ill., faces a fretful financial future: He has five children, and they are all headed for college. His eldest child, Caitlin, is about to enter the University of Michigan, where the total out-of-state tab is expected to top $30,000 for the next academic year. His next two children are two and three years younger, meaning that at some point he will probably be socked with three college bills at once.
Airport expansion begins
Construction workers race to complete work before Winston Cup weekend
August 7, 2001
By Chad Lawhorn Crews began moving earth Monday at Lawrence Municipal Airport in a dash to complete $1.9 million in improvements before the Winston Cup NASCAR race. Airport officials expect a fleet of private jets for the big race and qualifying runs in nearby Wyandotte County the weekend of Sept. 28-30.
Daily ticker
August 7, 2001