Archive for Tuesday, April 17, 2001

Year’s best in journalism, arts awarded Pulitzer Prizes

April 17, 2001

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— News coverage of the predawn raid by federal agents who grabbed Cuban boy Elian Gonzalez resulted in two Pulitzer Prizes on Monday: a breaking news reporting award for The Miami Herald and a breaking news photography award for Alan Diaz of The Associated Press.

Alan Diaz of the Associated Press won the Pulitzer Prize for
breaking news photography for this photo of the rescue of Elian
Gonzalez. In the photo, Donato Dalrymple, far right, holds
6-year-old Elian during the predawn hours of April 22, 2000, as
government agents stormed the Miami home to seize custody of the
boy.

Alan Diaz of the Associated Press won the Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography for this photo of the rescue of Elian Gonzalez. In the photo, Donato Dalrymple, far right, holds 6-year-old Elian during the predawn hours of April 22, 2000, as government agents stormed the Miami home to seize custody of the boy.

Diaz's dramatic photo captured the confrontation between a rifle-toting federal agent and a family friend clutching Elian in his arms at the height of last year's raid.

"It's awesome! I can't believe it!" Diaz said as he was mobbed by Miami AP staff members and toasted with champagne.

























JournalismPublic service: The Oregonian of Portland.Breaking news reporting: Staff of The Miami Herald.Investigative reporting: David Willman of the Los Angeles Times.Explanatory reporting: Staff of the Chicago Tribune.Beat reporting: David Cay Johnston of The New York Times.National reporting: Staff of The New York Times.International reporting (two winners): Ian Johnson of The Wall Street Journal, Paul Salopek of the Chicago Tribune.Feature writing: Tom Hallman Jr. of The Oregonian.Commentary: Dorothy Rabinowitz of The Wall Street Journal.Criticism: Gail Caldwell of The Boston Globe.Editorial writing: David Moats of the Rutland (Vt.) Herald.Editorial cartooning: Ann Telnaes of the Los Angeles Times Syndicate.Spot news photography: Alan Diaz of The Associated Press.Feature photography: Matt Rainey of The Star-Ledger of Newark, N.J.ArtsFiction: Michael Chabon for "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay."Drama: David Auburn for his play "Proof."History: Joseph J. Ellis for his book "Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation."Biography: David Levering Lewis for the second volume of his biography of civil rights leader W.E.B. Du Bois, "W.E.B. Du Bois: The Fight for Equality and The American Century, 1919-1963."Poetry: Stephen Dunn for his volume of original verses "Different Hours."General Nonfiction: Herbert P. Bix for his book "Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan."Music: John Corigliano for "Symphony No. 2 for String Orchestra."

The double winners were the Chicago Tribune, The New York Times, The Oregonian of Portland and The Wall Street Journal.

Also among the winners was the Rutland (Vt.) Herald, circulation 22,000, which won its first Pulitzer for David Moats' editorials supporting civil unions for gay couples.

The Oregonian won the public service award for a series about the Immigration and Naturalization Service and the feature writing prize for Tom Hallman Jr.'s profile of a disfigured teen-ager who underwent life-threatening surgery to improve his appearance.

The INS series found that the agency was detaining people for long periods without giving them access to legal representation.

The Times' David Cay Johnston won the beat reporting award for exposing loopholes and inequities in the U.S. tax code. The Times also won for national reporting for a series on race in America. The Tribune staff won the explanatory reporting award for "Gateway to Gridlock," about the American air traffic system.

There were two Pulitzers awarded this year in international reporting, and one of them went to Chicago Tribune reporter Paul Salopek, who wrote about political strife and epidemic disease in Africa. Salopek also won a Pulitzer in 1998 for explanatory reporting on the human genome project.

The other international reporting award went to Ian Johnson of The Wall Street Journal for stories about the Chinese government's suppression of the Falun Gong movement.

The Star-Ledger of Newark, N.J., won its first Pulitzer, for feature photography by Matt Rainey. His emotional pictures documented the care and recovery of two students burned in a dormitory fire at Seton Hall University. "I think they're heroes," Rainey said.

Each winner receives $7,500, except for the public service award, where the winner receives a gold medal. The winners of the 2001 prizes were chosen from 1,390 entries in journalism, 780 books, 112 submissions for music and a number of plays both in New York and in regional theaters.

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