Advertisement

Archive for Thursday, September 28, 2000

Short Stuff

September 28, 2000

Advertisement

Uniform treatment

Back to school not only means homework, but it also means sports and cleaning uniforms.

Members of the Chilean soccer team, shown here in a recent training
session at Melbourne's Olympic Park, probably use a professional
laundry service to clean their uniforms. Athletes who don't have
access to a service need to follow the uniform's care label.

Members of the Chilean soccer team, shown here in a recent training session at Melbourne's Olympic Park, probably use a professional laundry service to clean their uniforms. Athletes who don't have access to a service need to follow the uniform's care label.

As with any clothing, it is important to read and follow the care label to avoid costly errors. Remember, if you do not follow the care label, you not the manufacturer are responsible if a dye bleeds or in some other way the garment does not clean satisfactorily.

The Jefferson County Extension Office in Oskaloosa advises following these recommendations carefully:

1. Before cleaning, test the uniform for colorfastness and wash any garment that is not colorfast separately. If not, the color may bleed on other items. Washing on a cool temperature will reduce the chance of bleeding.

2. Laundering is the most effective method for removing heavy soil from most athletic uniforms. Mud stains and grass stains may require a pretreating product.

3. If machine drying is recommended on the care label, shrinkage and wrinkles can be minimized by drying the garments on a low temperature, removing them as soon as they are dry and immediately hanging on a hanger.

Internet use shifts balance of power to the young

The Internet is one of those things teen-agers seem to master effortlessly, and it is arguably the most significant demarcation between generations in the history of the world.

According to the Motherhood Project's Aird, the only thing that concerns parents more than the commercial exploitation of children is the impact of technology.

"It is changing the experience of childhood," said Enola Aird, director of the Motherhood Project at the Institute for American Values. "All the traditional boundaries that protected children from the adult world are coming down."

Indeed, said Thomas Hine, author of "The Rise and Fall of the American Teenager," this is one reason the concept of the teen-ager as an adult-in-waiting has become obsolete. They are not waiting for anything.

Teen-age entrepreneurs are no longer a People magazine oddity, and many companies are following Microsoft's example and hiring consultants right out of high school.

"Not only are we being bumped off the demographic map," said Mary Kay Blakely, author of "American Mom, but teens are "bringing along a culture that we know diddly-squat about. It's unseemly. We can't hand them the baton, they already have the baton. They're inventing the baton."

Underlying grievances

Remember early feminists burning their bras? Well, underwear also was involved in a recent protest at Salinas High School in California. In this case, however, it was the students who were burned by a dress code they said denied them the right to wear thongs. Not so, insisted school officials, who said the thong thing was just a rumor.

A ticklish problem

Scientists may have unraveled a mystery that has puzzled them and millions of children for years why it is impossible to tickle yourself?

British researchers say the secret lies in the cerebellum, a region at the back of the brain that predicts the sensory consequences of movements and sends signals to the rest of the brain instructing it to ignore the resulting sensation.

The mechanism once protected us against predators by distinguishing between stimuli we created and those generated externally.

Commenting has been disabled for this item.