Archive for Wednesday, September 6, 2000

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Colorado’s Colvin to start
September 6, 2000
Colorado quarterback Zac Colvin has recovered from a bruised elbow and will start Saturday’s game at No. 11 Southern California, but tailback Cortlen Johnson may be sidelined by a sprained toe.
Five Devil Rays draw suspensions
September 6, 2000
Tampa Bay outfielder Gerald Williams was suspended for five games and fined $2,000 for last week’s fights against Boston, and four teammates were suspended for one-to-three games apiece.
Area Briefs
September 6, 2000
City refers rentals plans to Planning Commission
September 6, 2000
By Kendrick Blackwood Lawrence-Douglas County planning commissioners will have a chance to consider a proposal that would limit the number of unrelated people allowed to live in Lawrence’s single-family residentially owned neighborhoods.
Wildcats select Carmody
September 6, 2000
Bill Carmody, who posted a 92-25 record in his four years as head coach at Princeton, will be introduced today as Northwestern’s new basketball coach, the Associated Press has learned.
Kingsbury perfect fit in Tech’s offense
September 6, 2000
In just two games, Kliff Kingsbury has proven that he’s the perfect quarterback for new Texas Tech coach Mike Leach’s pass-happy offense.
Student’s death brings counselors to CJHS
School mourns in wake of fatal accident
September 6, 2000
By Tom Meagher Counselors arrived at Central Junior High Tuesday to comfort grieving classmates of Alicia Ann Chavez, 14, who was killed by injuries from a weekend car wreck.
Indian leaders coming to KU
Conference participants to discuss tribal leadership, politics
September 6, 2000
Kansas University and Haskell Indian Nations University are planning a three-day conference to discuss American Indian leadership and tribal politics. The conference will take place on both the KU and HINU campuses Sept. 14-16.
Sports briefs
September 6, 2000
Blue Valley clips shorthanded FSHS Perry falls to Immaculata
UAB to play on Thursday
September 6, 2000
Alabama-Birmingham went through its final practice Tuesday in preparation for Thursday night’s season opener against Tennessee-Chattanooga.
City commission approves citizen survey
September 6, 2000
By Kendrick Blackwood Between 1992 and 1998, the number of Lawrence residents who rated the city’s public transportation as good declined from 29 percent to 18 percent, according to a survey by Kansas University Policy Research Institute.
Goldie Young
September 6, 2000
James Cottle
September 6, 2000
Jenny Burke
September 6, 2000
Wilbur Edmonds
September 6, 2000
Walter Thome
September 6, 2000
Fire damages Lawrence nursery
September 6, 2000
By Tom Meagher Fire Tuesday evening damaged a part of a storage building at the city’s oldest greenhouse and forced parts of two nearby streets to be closed. Lawrence-Douglas County Fire & Medical firefighters quickly contained the blaze that swept through the Sunrise Garden Center, 1501 Learnard Ave.
On The Record
September 6, 2000
GTAs ready to begin negotiations
Teaching assistants seek pay, benefit concessions
September 6, 2000
By Erwin Seba The graduate teaching assistants union is beginning negotiations with Kansas University for a new contract. Ophra Leyser, president of the Graduate Teaching Assistants Coalition, said the 200-member union wants improvement in salaries and health insurance for the nearly 1,000 GTAs who will be covered by the contract.
FSHS upends two-time defending state champs
Trahan scores three goals, giving Firebird coach Pendleton meaningful birthday present
September 6, 2000
By Robert Sinclair Free State High boys soccer coach Jason Pendleton couldn’t have asked for a better birthday present Tuesday night. FSHS senior forward Todd Trahan tallied a hat trick as the Firebirds defeated Class 6A two-time defending state champion Shawnee Mission Northwest, 3-2, at the Youth Sports Inc. field.
Haskell quarterback honored
Watson named Central States offensive player of week
September 6, 2000
Brandon Watson of Haskell Indian Nations University has been named Central States Football League offensive player of the week.
Blue-chip recruit Lee may not sign
St. Louis prep still favoring Gators
September 6, 2000
By Gary Bedore David Lee held a press conference last week to announce his decision to attend the University of Florida on basketball scholarship.
Indian crews play integral part of fighting Western wildfires
September 6, 2000
Drawing on their knowledge of the land and the behavior of wildfires, thousands of American Indians are helping battle the blazes burning across the West. Firefighting has become a much-needed source of revenue and pride for tribes across the country. And at a time when blazes across the West are stretching manpower thin, the Indian firefighters play an important role.
Nursing homes plead for funds
10% of facilities declared bankruptcy, Congress told
September 6, 2000
The nursing home industry, beset by bankruptcy woes, pleaded for help Tuesday from Congress. “We’re talking about the economic viability of this profession and I think it’s at risk,” lobbyist Charles Roadman told the Senate Select Committee on Aging.
Armstrong won’t skip Games
Bicycling champion has broken vertebrae in neck
September 6, 2000
Two-time Tour de France champion Lance Armstrong broke a vertebrae in his neck when he collided with a car last month but still plans to race at the Sydney Olympics.
Sideline
September 6, 2000
KU tied for sixth in Japan MNF ratings down slightly
KU adds 15 percent more Merit Scholars
September 6, 2000
By Erwin Seba Kansas University has set a record for the number of National Merit Scholars enrolled. A total of 116 merit scholars entered the university as freshmen this year. That’s 15 more than entered KU last year. Chancellor Robert Hemenway said the increase combined with growth of students entering the honors program proves KU’s academic reputation remains strong.
Generation ‘Y’ goes online
Junior high students show their elders a thing or two about the ‘Net
September 6, 2000
By Tim Carpenter Sean Edmiston outlined plans for creation of a Web-based virtual tour of Central Junior High School. South Junior High School student Alex Curnes presented his Powerpoint lesson on tornado formation.
State Briefs
September 6, 2000
Business Briefcase
September 6, 2000
List lauds firms that back women
Security Benefit among top 100
September 6, 2000
Fannie Mae offers paid time off for volunteer work. The Benjamin Group/BSMG pays its employees to exercise. The Security Benefit Group of Companies evaluates managers and rewards them with cash bonuses for recruiting diverse job candidates, including women.
Squirrel shuts down Wolf Creek
Animal gets caught in wires; resulting fire damages transformer
September 6, 2000
The Wolf Creek nuclear power plant will probably be out of operation until the end of the week, after a squirrel caused a fire that shut down the plant. The squirrel got caught between two electric wires Monday, causing the fire. No human was injured.
Briefs
September 6, 2000
Varied diet outweighs bacterial risk
September 6, 2000
By Susan Krumm Cooking Q & A Is it true that there are more bacteria in our food today than there was 50 years ago? Yes! In fact, current public health studies show that the number of potentially harmful bacteria in our food supply is five times the level it was in 1942. That doesn’t necessarily mean that our food is unsafe.
Chefs pull together for Douglas County children
September 6, 2000
By Jill Hummels Four Lawrence chefs are putting their skills on the table to help children in Douglas County. Douglas County Infant-Toddler Coordinating Council (ICC) is having Around the Block For Kids Restaurant Tour, a progressive fund-raising dinner, Sunday. The tour features stops at four downtown Lawrence establishments.
Worldwide religious repression chronicled
September 6, 2000
A State Department report released Tuesday says a significant percentage of the world population does not have the right to religious freedom, and it names Iraq and Afghanistan among the worst offenders.
Rick McClelland
September 6, 2000
Vatican asserts ‘defects’ in other religions
September 6, 2000
A new Vatican declaration issued Tuesday says that only faithful Catholics can attain full salvation from earthly sin, and that other beliefs including Protestant Christian ones have defects that render them inferior.
Pope criticized couples who won’t have children
September 6, 2000
Marking the third anniversary of Mother Teresa’s death, Pope John Paul II on Tuesday praised the nun’s generosity and took to task couples who decide to remain childless.
Philadelphia teachers authorize strike
September 6, 2000
The nation’s sixth-largest school district braced for a strike as early as Friday after Philadelphia teachers authorized what would be their first walkout in 19 years. Union president Ted Kirsch did not immediately call a strike and classes were still scheduled to begin Thursday for the district’s 205,000 students and 256 schools.
Girl athletes’ training may spur bone loss
September 6, 2000
Girl athletes should be watched closely to make sure that their training doesn’t include poor eating habits that could result in damaging bone loss, the American Academy of Pediatrics says.
Catholic hospitals’ rape care studied
September 6, 2000
Although emergency contraception is standard treatment for rape victims, some Catholic hospitals do not tell victims about the method unless they ask, according to a survey by University of Pennsylvania researchers.
U.S., Pacific nations OK tuna fishing pact
September 6, 2000
The United States and several other nations agreed Tuesday to create a commission to regulate the catch of tuna in the Pacific Ocean, but Japan threatened to ignore any new regulations if its concerns aren’t addressed.
World Briefs
September 6, 2000
Power of prayer
September 6, 2000
Estate tax hoax
September 6, 2000
Beleaguered home to close
Southwinds to shut doors Sept. 28; scramble on to place loved ones
September 6, 2000
By Mike Belt The looming shutdown of a Lawrence nursing home has set off a scramble for care, forcing some families to move aging relatives out of the city. Southwinds Rehabilitation and Care Center, 1800 W. 27th St., has notified residents’ relatives that it will close Sept. 28.
Dangerous distractions
September 6, 2000
Slippage is real
September 6, 2000
Turn It Up’ blares with rap, hip-hop cliches
September 6, 2000
Fashion is not the same thing as acting, a distinction apparently lost on the makers of “Turn It Up.” In this rap-and-crime melodrama Pras Michel (of the Fugees rap group and, more recently, a solo act) definitely has a look, thanks to a wardrobe of turtleneck sweaters and black leather jackets.
Next chapter: Cyberspace
J. Hood Booksellers to close shop after 26 years
September 6, 2000
By Mark Fagan As John Hood closes the book on his 26-year-old shop, he still plans to write plenty of success stories in cyberspace. J. Hood Booksellers, a buyer and seller of used books, will close by Thanksgiving at 1401 Mass., said Hood, who co-owns the place with his wife, Gloria.
New plan endorses oversight
Democrats unveil child welfare reforms
September 6, 2000
The top two Democratic legislators offered a plan Tuesday to improve the state’s child welfare system that includes an independent oversight commission. The plan also called for paying what Democrats say is owed to providers of foster care and adoption services and enacting the proposed Child Welfare Reform Act that died in the 1999 Legislature.
WorldCom builds Web through Intermedia
Controlling stake in Digex is gem of $3 billion deal, WorldCom’s first wireless move since failed Sprint merger
September 6, 2000
WorldCom Inc. has agreed to pay $3 billion in stock to acquire Intermedia Communications Inc. and a controlling stake in Digex Inc., a leading operator of computer centers that run Web sites.
Police brutality alleged
Lone Star resident’s arm is broken during deputy’s call
September 6, 2000
By Joel Mathis A Douglas County Sheriff’s deputy broke a Lone Star man’s arm, drove him to the hospital emergency room for treatment and then drove him back home, allegedly with the warning he’d better not file a lawsuit against the Sheriff’s Department.
Old Home Town - 100 years ago today
September 6, 2000
National Briefs
September 6, 2000
Wind whips Sydney causing damage, delays
September 6, 2000
The howling winds that knocked out train service at Olympic Park station Tuesday and also damaged sailboats training on Sydney Harbor underlined two of the biggest fears of Olympic organizers.
Bush unveils drug plan for elderly
Medicare plan includes prescription drug rider
September 6, 2000
George W. Bush outlined a $158 billion prescription drug plan Tuesday that he said would offer senior citizens more choices and quicker coverage than Al Gore’s competing Medicare expansion.
KU duffers tied for 6th in Japan
September 6, 2000
Kansas University’s men’s golf team was tied for sixth place, but only 10 strokes off the lead after the first round of the Topy Cup. Kansas, one of four U.S. schools competing in the 11-team tourney, fired a 302 and was tied with California.
Olympic briefs
September 6, 2000
Thompson hurts thumb while training in pool Number of athletes in village near 11,000
Glavine logs 19th victory
Braves’ hurler outduels Diamondbacks’ Johnson
September 6, 2000
If Tom Glavine wins another Cy Young Award, he may remember this game as a real vote-getter. The Atlanta left-hander became the NL’s first 19-game winner in a showdown between the two leading Cy Young candidates, recovering from a tortuous first inning to beat Arizona and Randy Johnson, 5-2, Tuesday night.
Indians rally, as usual
Cleveland erases four-run deficit, tops Tampa Bay
September 6, 2000
The Cleveland Indians are playing so well that even an early four-run deficit won’t deter them.
County seeks FEMA grant
September 6, 2000
By Joy Ludwig Douglas County Emergency Management is seeking a $20,000-plus federal grant to help fund its department.
Lawrence Briefs
September 6, 2000
Fewer people on food stamps
Red tape, low benefits partially to blame, advocates say
September 6, 2000
A heart attack knocked Lorraine Smith out of work in June, making her more dependent than ever on food stamps. But the benefits are fast becoming more trouble than they are worth.
People, Faces & Things
September 6, 2000
Injuries accompany scooter fad across America
September 6, 2000
They are the fad of the moment but those sleek, fold-up foot scooters have sent nearly 9,500 Americans, mostly children, to emergency rooms with injuries this year. The number of scooter-related injuries has surged this summer, with more than 4,000 in August alone compared with fewer than 500 in May, the Consumer Product Safety Commission said Tuesday.
Foundation faces new lien
Company says $60,000 owed by Haskell Foundation
September 6, 2000
By Dave Ranney A Lawrence construction company with strong ties to Haskell Indian Nations University has filed a lien against the troubled Haskell Foundation, claiming it is owed $60,000. Postoak Construction says it entered a $100,000 contract for finish work tied to the foundation’s move last October to the Free State Business Center, 1201 Wakarusa Drive. So far, the company has been paid only $40,000.
Animals stage a takeover on vacation island
September 6, 2000
By David Broder Columnist for Washington Post Writers Group The summer season has ended with this isolated haven in the grips of a full ecological crisis.
Bush takes cheap shot at Clinton
September 6, 2000
By Jim Hougland Columnist for the Washington Post Writers Group Foreign policy and the national interest often lag far behind domestic politics in Bill Clinton’s calculations. This failing of the Clinton years is a flaw that George W. Bush should be able to capitalize on in his bid to succeed Clinton.
Alicia Chavez
September 6, 2000
Some Blue Ribbon schools don’t make the grade
September 6, 2000
Only about a fourth of the public schools lauded as “America’s most successful” last year by the U.S. Department of Education earned the distinction through academic achievement, according to a study released Tuesday.
World leaders meet for U.N. summit
Clinton to focus on Mideast peace talks
September 6, 2000
The official agenda at the three-day Millennium Summit is lofty and utopian: to bring peace and prosperity to the world. But before it even began, more than 150 world leaders got a head start on their own pressing concerns, from the United States edging closer to ties with Iran to the North Koreans getting hot under the collar after an alleged strip search.
Yanks roll past Royals
September 6, 2000
David Cone rolled in agony on the same field where he first hit the big leagues, scant yards away from the pitcher’s mound where he once won a Cy Young Award.
Medical school applications dropping
Minority enrollment also hard hit
September 6, 2000
The number of applicants to the nation’s 125 medical schools fell for the third straight year in 1999, in part because of the booming economy and the changing face of medicine, researchers say
Horoscopes
September 6, 2000
Williams excited to return
Kansas receiver had to listen to loss on radio
September 6, 2000
By Andrew Hartsock Kansas University football players who were frustrated in person by the Jayhawks’ season-opening loss at Southern Methodist should have experienced the game from Algen Williams’ standpoint.
Cunningham vows to stay on job
September 6, 2000
Gunther Cunningham said Tuesday he was not planning to resign as head coach of the Kansas City Chiefs despite reports that he told his players he thought about quitting.
Huskers ready for Irish
NU coach says Notre Dame deserves ranking
September 6, 2000
Notre Dame is not a newcomer to this season’s Top 25 as far as Nebraska coach Frank Solich is concerned.
National Briefs
September 6, 2000
MTV awards look to build on shocking reputation
September 6, 2000
Quick quiz: Who’s won the most MTV Video Music Awards? Bonus question: Who won the most awards last year? Question three: Who cares? Awards are never really the point of the Video Music Awards, anyway.
Toronto: Tops for film lovers
Festival for movie buffs grows into eclectic celebrity showcase
September 6, 2000
It started as a gathering for local film buffs with a low budget, a low profile and a celebrity guest list of fewer than a dozen people. Twenty-five years later, the Toronto International Film Festival that opens Thursday has grown into North America’s premier movie showcase, a launch pad for top Oscar contenders and a prime location for Hollywood to scout new talent.
Week off should give Allen, Jayhawks reprieve
September 6, 2000
Not likely is it the Big 12 Conference, which churns Players of the Week out like crabgrass, will ever inaugurate a weekly Coach on the Hot Seat.
Global warming report draws skepticism at KU
Draft warns of dire dryness in western Kansas
September 6, 2000
A Kansas scientist doesn’t put much stock in a draft report suggesting that global warming could make the western half of the state much drier over the next hundred years.
Recipes
September 6, 2000
Crisp apples come into their own despite summer heat
September 6, 2000
By Gwyn Mellinger Given the scorching hot summer we’ve just had and apparently will continue to have it’s probably a miracle that we’ve had anything come off our apple trees but leaves. So far, we’ve managed to pick about half a dozen Golden Delicious apples and a couple of Reds, but there won’t be many more from the look of things.
Pull out a plum
Juicy fruits are the glory of summer
September 6, 2000
Whether green, yellow, red, blue, purple or even almost black, the plum is such a luscious and sought-after fruit that for at least 200 years “plum” has also meant something very desirable as in “a plum job.”
Ford, Firestone face hearings
September 6, 2000
Lawmakers have an arsenal of questions about defective Firestone tires, but the congressional hearings that begin Wednesday are not likely to produce the answer to the most vexing: What is making the tires come apart on the road?
Nightline’ gets serious about hip-hop
News program takes in-depth look at rap industry’s business, fashion
September 6, 2000
Mixing science and the law
September 6, 2000
By Mike Hoeflich Professor in the Kansas University School of Law One of the advantages of being one-half of an academic couple is that dinner time discussions, on occasion, lead to scholarly collaboration. Over the years, my wife, Karen, and I have written articles together on various topics where law and science come together.
U.S. pounds Spain, 95-66
American women also prevail, 75-59 against France
September 6, 2000
A couple of highlight-reel dunks by Vince Carter and Ray Allen at the start of the second half signaled the arrival of the U.S. Olympic men’s basketball team.
Williams sisters raise bar on tour
Fast friends, siblings will team in doubles for United States at Olympic Games in Sydney
September 6, 2000
Tennis needed a savior. Now it has two.
Problems plentiful for Aggies
September 6, 2000
It’s “oops” time for the Texas Aggies.
Venus survives
No. 1 seed Hingis subdues Seles in straight sets
September 6, 2000
Venus Williams hit bottom, so to speak, when she double-faulted three times in one game, whiffed at an overhead, stomped to her chair, missed the seat and plopped to the court.
Commission Briefs
September 6, 2000
Caminiti leaves Astros
September 6, 2000
Ken Caminiti of the Houston Astros, the 1996 National League MVP, left the team to undergo evaluation for chemical dependency, a source close to the third baseman said Tuesday.
Kathryn Robson
September 6, 2000
Daily Ticker
September 6, 2000
National Briefs
September 6, 2000
Briefly
September 6, 2000
Monkeys can be unpredictable, dangerous as pets
September 6, 2000