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Archive for Sunday, September 3, 2000

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How They Run Elections in North Kensington
September 3, 2000
By Joel J. Gold A recent telephone call soliciting a political contribution got me thinking about my experience with the more colorful political scene in London a few years back.
Don’t complicate modest estates with living trusts
September 3, 2000
Current Prices
September 3, 2000
Get a load of the things people know by heart
September 3, 2000
What a marvel, the mind! It may not let us remember the name of the book we just finished, or why we moseyed into the freezer aisle at the grocery store. But by golly, it won’t let us forget all 28 members, in alphabetical order, of an eighth-grade dramatics class 30 years ago.
Candidates lack meaningful stands on issues affecting U.S. military
September 3, 2000
Presidential candidates George W. Bush and Al Gore spent all of last week debating the state of the U.S. military. Both pledged to add to the defense budget. Both said they would raise military pay. Both promised to be judicious in the use of American force. Both failed to say anything meaningful about the state of the U.S. military.
Old Home Town - 40 and 100 years ago
September 3, 2000
Bike lane kudos
September 3, 2000
Truman Library to close renovations Tuesday
September 3, 2000
Renovations at the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum will force it to close this week, officials said. Heavy construction, part of the library’s $22.5 million renovation, will continue through the fall and winter. The library will close on Tuesday.
Crime Brief
September 3, 2000
Offices to close for holiday
September 3, 2000
Government offices and public services in Lawrence will be closed Monday in observance of Labor Day.
Lucille Barrie
September 3, 2000
Democrats open party headquarters
September 3, 2000
By Mike Belt Douglas County’s Democrats celebrated the opening of their campaign nerve center Saturday while eating cookies and expressing optimism about their chances in the fall general election.
New drug shows promise against lung disease
September 3, 2000
An experimental drug could make breathing much easier for millions of people suffering from “smoker’s lung,” new research suggests. In tests involving 500 people who had suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease for more than a decade, the drug appeared to be safer and better at improving breathing and at reducing infections and hospital visits than the best current treatment, researchers said.
Pius IX’s beatification protested
Pope John Paul II’s order reopens old wounds, Jewish groups say
September 3, 2000
Descendants of a Jewish-born boy wrenched from his family in the 19th century with the blessing of Pope Pius IX joined hundreds in a candelight protest Saturday on the eve of Pius’ beatification. Pope John Paul II’s planned declaration today of Pius as among the Roman Catholic Church’s blessed “is the reopening of a wound.
Phonographs still capture music enthusiats attention
September 3, 2000
There are several reasons why old phonographs are selling for high prices. Collectors are showing a growing interest in technology antiques and early mechanical devices. There is also a need for working phonographs that can be used to play the old records that are collected by music historians.
College guides lampooned
Harvard humor magazine throws curve at admission manuals
September 3, 2000
There’s a new college guide out, but prospective freshmen may want to think twice about taking “The Harvard Lampoon’s Guide to College Admissions” seriously. The publication, which hit bookstores Friday, parodies the cottage industry of lists, guides and manuals that have catered to parents zealously seeking the perfect school — even before their little student can spell “college.”
Argentina lemon law lifted
September 3, 2000
Fresh lemons are on their way to American supermarkets, and some U.S. citrus growers aren’t happy about it. The Clinton administration has lifted a longtime ban on Argentine citrus that will allow American consumers to get fresh lemons when the U.S.-grown fruit is out of season. The ban was intended to keep fruit-damaging diseases out of the United States.
Suicide prevention foundation director loses 2 sons to suicide
September 3, 2000
After Les Franklin’s teen-age son committed suicide, he channeled his grief into helping others and founded a suicide prevention organization so other families wouldn’t endure similar tragedies. But ten years after the suicide of Shaka Franklin, Les Franklin has found himself inexplicably reliving the same nightmare: His troubled son, Jamon, committed suicide last month.
Fire casts shadow on owner’s dreams
Arson suspected in Dodge City depot restaurant blaze
September 3, 2000
A man who saw his dream go up in smoke said he hopes it isn’t true that the fire was deliberately set.
World leaders heading to U.N.
September 3, 2000
Take over 150 world leaders — dictators and democrats, the famous and unknown. Put them together at the United Nations for three days. The result is likely to be one of the most intense political moments in recent history.
Three more charged in home invasion case
Police seek two others for questioning
September 3, 2000
Three people were charged Friday with being lookouts for the break-in that led to a woman being kidnapped and held hostage in a sport utility vehicle. District Attorney Nick Tomasic said the three also were involved in five earlier Kansas City, Kan., home robberies in which intruders impersonated law enforcement officers.
KU slips in national rankings
Among public universities, Kansas still in top 50
September 3, 2000
By Erwin Seba Kansas University slipped four places in the latest U.S. News and World Report ranking of the top 50 public universities. Last year, in the annual “America’s Best Colleges” issue, KU was ranked 38th among the top 50 public schools. This year, the university was tied for 42nd with Auburn University in Alabama.
NL Roundup
September 3, 2000
People, Faces & Things
September 3, 2000
D.C. Mall converted into Christian mass
Rally touts ‘spiritual revolution
September 3, 2000
Tens of thousands of Christian youths gathered on the Mall Saturday in a dawn-to-dusk prayer rally that called for reconciliation between children and parents, an end to abortion and sexual immorality, and the return of school-sponsored prayer. TheCallDC drew teen-agers, youths, adult leaders and parents from as far away as California and Australia
Politician on the stump, probation
Pennsylvania candidate serving sentence from misdemeanor plea
September 3, 2000
Bill Slocum wanted to wear shorts while campaigning for the state Senate, but he didn’t want voters to see the electronic monitoring device strapped to his ankle. In order to campaign, he must clear his public appearances with his probation officer while serving a period of home confinement. “I don’t have any misconception that this is an easy thing,” he said.
Welcome rain slows wildfires
Montana sees first significant precipitation since blazes began
September 3, 2000
A few days of rain have helped to slow the spread of wildfires burning on hundreds of thousands of acres across the Northern Rockies. “These are probably the best conditions we’ve had since this fire started,” said Dan Kincaid, a fire information officer for a 81,000-acre fire near Townsend. “I think it will allow (firefighters) to make pretty good progress this weekend.”
Analysts’ recommendations need support
September 3, 2000
It was not the kind of thing that makes people pour into the streets to dance, but the Securities and Exchange Commission’s recent decision to ban unseemly relations between public companies and favored Wall Streeters was a victory for the little guy.
Shrubs offer fall color
September 3, 2000
By Bruce Chladny Horticulture agent at K-State Reasearch and Extension-Douglas County We normally think of woody plants flowering in the spring or early summer. But there are, however, several shrubs that flower later in the growing season. When selecting shrubs to plant this fall, consider some of these as they can add late season color to the landscape.
Roots Briefs
September 3, 2000
Gore gains lead
Close race still expected; Midwest to play key role
September 3, 2000
Democrat Al Gore has come from behind to build a slight lead over Republican George W. Bush in the race for state electoral votes, but is still short of the total needed to win the presidency, according to an analysis by The Associated Press. Fourteen states plus the District of Columbia are leaning Gore’s way or solidly in his column at the Labor Day start of the fall campaign, putting him at 201 electoral votes 69 fewer than the 270 required to win.
Local Brief
September 3, 2000
Business briefcase
September 3, 2000
School bus brake systems failure reported
September 3, 2000
One of the country’s largest school bus builders is warning that 6,000 of its school buses may have defective brake systems and 40,000 other buses may be affected nationwide. The defect involves the anti-lock brake system on buses manufactured between March 1998 and last month, said Debi Nicholson, a spokeswoman for Freightliner Corp., the Portland-based parent company of Thomas Built Buses Inc.
Vietnam memorial plaque at issue
Addition to D.C. monument debated among veterans, Congress
September 3, 2000
The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, which had opposed the addition of a commemorative plaque to the memorial to honor veterans who died after the war of “bloodless wounds,” is now involved in funding, designing and placing the plaque.
Baker’s Kirk places second
September 3, 2000
Baker University’s Liesel Kirk placed second at the Maple Leaf Invitational cross country meet on Saturday at Baldwin City Municipal Golf Course. She finished in 12:09.6.
Tire workers talks continue
September 3, 2000
Union negotiators and Bridgestone/Firestone continued talking Saturday night as more than 8,400 workers at nine tire plants remained poised to strike at a moment’s notice.
LHS boys, FSHS girls win meet
Lions’ McClain takes individual title
September 3, 2000
The heat was on Saturday and so were Lawrence High’s boys and Free State High’s girls cross country teams at the Overland Park Aquinas Invitational at Johnson County CC.
Jayhawks capture tourney
September 3, 2000
Kansas University’s volleyball team defeated Purdue three games to one Saturday night in the championship match of the Mortar Board Premier Tournament.
Decoding information
Lawrence statistician builds business by mining data
September 3, 2000
By Tom Meagher For the past four years, Dave Kingsley has been responsible for the way many legislators, educators and parents understand Kansas teen-agers. He knows more about the trends of teen drinking and drug use than most high school students. He’s a statistician. “We have six years of data on teen-age issues in general,” Kingsley said of his company, GRI Research in Lawrence.
Haskell bashes Trinity
Watson, Duncan connect in HINU’s 38-12 win
September 3, 2000
By Gary Bedore It was billed as the first game of the season for Haskell Indian Nations University’s football team. Fightin’ Indians quarterback Brandon Watson and wide receiver Sonny Duncan appeared to be in midseason form, however, as they clicked three times for touchdowns in HINU’s 38-12 victory over Trinity Bible College Saturday at steamy Haskell Stadium.
Rams have passed Buffs in Colorado
CU faces reality check following second consecutive loss to Colorado State
September 3, 2000
Colorado players didn’t have to face abusive Colorado State fans on their way off the Mile High Stadium field this time. They didn’t encounter a shower of bottles and cans, or have tear gas launched in their defense.
Sampras reaches round of 16
Serena Williams ousts Casoni in straight sets at U.S. Open
September 3, 2000
The latest hero in this melting pot of a U.S. Open, and the next to face four-time champion Pete Sampras, is a South Korean qualifier from a small, rural town who speaks little English and whose only friend in New York owns a dry cleaning shop.
Policing the field
Former KU receiver now catches crooks
September 3, 2000
By Mike Belt Willie Vaughn sat behind the wheel of his patrol car and watched a woman carrying a baby walk to the front door of her northeast Kansas City, Kan., house. The woman had just told Vaughn about an 11-year-old boy who had been threatening to use a gun to kill someone. Vaughn would watch for the boy and his report would be forwarded to detectives.
Critics of Colombian aid fear another El Salvador
September 3, 2000
When President Clinton said last week that the $1.3 billion aid package to Colombia will not lead to another Vietnam, some of the plan’s main critics agreed. A better comparison, they say, is El Salvador. In the 1980s, the United States helped the El Salvadoran military, despite its human rights abuses, to fight leftist guerrillas.
Royals score twice in ninth to nudge Tampa Bay
Throwing error by pitcher Hernandez opens door for Kansas City’s 7-5 triumph
September 3, 2000
Tampa Bay threw away the game. Roberto Hernandez’s throwing error allowed the go-ahead run to score in the ninth inning as the Kansas City Royals beat the Devil Rays, 7-5, Saturday.
Not just academic
Falling numbers mean fewer dollars
September 3, 2000
By Joy Ludwig In the search for Lawrence’s “missing” public school students, stories like this may be enlightening: This summer, Lori and Brett Fritzel moved to Eudora to get away from Lawrence’s hustle and bustle. They wanted to live in a smaller community where their two children, Tyler and D.J., could grow up and attend school. Tyler is a kindergartner and D.J. is in fifth grade.
Opening-night fright - SMU 31, Kansas 17
Mustangs strike early, often as Jayhawks self-destruct in season opener
September 3, 2000
By Chuck Woodling Road kill. Still. Southern Methodist, playing its first game in brand-new Ford Stadium, handed Kansas its 15th road loss in 16 games under coach Terry Allen on Saturday night.
KU fumbles opener
September 3, 2000
Call it the debacle in Dallas. Kansas University’s football team, trying to put a putrid road-show reputation behind it, instead added to its lore of road-game futility with a 31-17 loss to Southern Methodist on Saturday night at SMU’s new Ford Stadium.
Publisher’s Weekly best-selling books
September 3, 2000
Audio Book Review
The Heart Revolution” By Dr. Kilmer McCully and Martha McCully, read by the authors
September 3, 2000
Is heart disease strictly caused by high cholesterol and a diet of too much fat? Then why are the French able to eat so much foie gras and drink red wine and still have one of the lowest rates of heart disease in the world? The author believes that vitamin B deficiencies in the American diet is the chief reason that heart disease is this country’s No. 1 killer.
Highway Robbery’ is a return trip to a painful past
September 3, 2000
Transportation engineer Owen Allison learns you can go home again, but the roads may be more complex, the ride not quite as smooth and the memories not as intact in “Highway Robbery” by John Billheimer. Allison returns to his West Virginia hometown when human remains are found under old pavement. His mother believes it may be the body of Allison’s father, who supposedly was swept away in a flash flood more than 35 years ago
The humble hikers
Backpacking offers European sights and sounds on a budget
September 3, 2000
Americans Elona and Mark Holdhusen, both 23, didn’t want a traditional honeymoon. The bride wore a patchwork skirt and Birkenstocks; the groom sported a knit skullcap. Both carried huge backpacks, and hundreds of strangers shared their “limousine” — the Eurostar train from London to Paris.
Indian Arts Show winners announced
September 3, 2000
Prize winners and participants in the 12th Annual Lawrence Indian Arts Show juried competition have been announced by show officials. Opening Saturday, the juried exhibit will present 171 works by 83 artists representing 49 tribes and 15 states. Prize money totaling $7,550, awarded in two- and three-dimensional categories, includes two best-of-show awards of $1,500 each, 14 merit awards of $300 each, and $350 in youth competition awards. This year’s judges were Barry Coffin and Suzan Shown Harjo.
South Africa dragging death shows lingering racism problem
September 3, 2000
In a country riven by racism, Abelina Ntjantja Rampuru had always viewed whites as regular people, just like her family, who simply had a different skin color. That was before, according to police, her husband’s white employer tied one end of a wire around his leg, looped the other end to his pickup truck and dragged the black man for three miles before dumping his mutilated, lifeless body in an open field.
Conventions have become too conventional
September 3, 2000
By Calder Pickett Well, the conventions are over, and we can continue with the agony of the campaign. I’m worried about myself: Why wasn’t I interested this year? Has the campaign been as dull as the talking heads and cartoonists have told us?
Seniors show their class
Ranks of retirees growing at colleges, universities
September 3, 2000
Robert Larson is almost out of courses to take at Ohio Wesleyan University. But the 80-year-old retired history instructor and full-time Civil War buff hasn’t missed a semester in some 15 years, and he isn’t about to start now.
Nature pane has rain forest
September 3, 2000
Nature-loving collectors are likely to be interested in the U.S. Postal Service’s recently issued Pacific Coast rain forest stamp pane. It is the second in the Nature of America series and depicts 26 animals and plants. The first in the series was the Sonoran Desert pane released in 1999.
Changes in IRA can help with ex-wife’s expenses
September 3, 2000
My husband and I are calling it quits after 16 years of marriage and two children. I stopped my education to go to work so my husband could attend and complete medical school, internship, and residency. Now, at age 35, without education, I find my employment future is bleak.
Heat doesn’t stifle holiday weekend outings
September 3, 2000
By Mike Belt T.J. and Tina Purdy weren’t going to let the crowd or the 100-degree plus heat stop them from having fun this Labor Day weekend at Perry Lake. That’s why the Mayetta couple and their two children arrived to stake their claim early Friday morning near the lake’s Rock Creek Park. They picked a spot underneath a grouping of trees only a few yards from the water’s edge.
Top 25 Roundup
September 3, 2000
There’s no place like home except in Green Bay, Charlotte
NFL’s Packers are looking to make improvements to Lambeau Field, but voters might not approve a half-percent tax increase
September 3, 2000
With Roy Williams’ exciting basketball program and with Terry Allen and Co. battling to make Kansas Big 12-competitive in football, we are inclined to believe Allen Fieldhouse and Memorial Stadium will always be with us, regarded as places to see and be seen.
Mattingly returns for Old-Timers’ Day
Popular first baseman, Berra, Winfield among former Yankees back for team’s annual gathering
September 3, 2000
Nowhere else in sports is there a more storied tradition than Yankee Stadium. And there was plenty of history on display Saturday during the 54th Old-Timers’ Day ceremonies.
Gladys Zimmeril
September 3, 2000
La Femme’ gets new lease on life from USA Network
September 3, 2000
USA Network treated “La Femme Nikita” rather shabbily last Sunday virtually tossing away its three-part series finale by scheduling it over two weeks and interrupting the flow of the final two hours with episodes of “The War Next Door” and “Manhattan, AZ.” It deserved better than a quick, ugly cancellation.
Mrs. Brady’ revisits ‘Today’
Florence Henderson of ‘Later Today’ started early show 40 years ago
September 3, 2000
Petite singer-actress Florence Henderson has an impressive show-biz resume, including a recent stint as co-host of NBC’s short-lived “Later Today” morning show. She is perhaps best known for her role as Carol Brady on the popular sitcom, “The Brady Bunch,” which ran from 1969 to 1974. But she also starred in “Fanny” on Broadway in 1954, appeared in Noel Coward’s final Broadway musical “The Girl Who Came to Supper” in 1964, and co-starred in the 1970 film “Song of Norway” (which did poorly at the box office).
Parochial school enrollment swings
September 3, 2000
By Joy Ludwig Perplexing swings in enrollment this school year are being seen in area parochial as well as public schools. Lawrence’s Catholic schools, a partnership of St. John the Evangelist and Corpus Christi Catholic churches, is growing. St. John’s School has been operating for many years, near capacity, said the school’s principal, Pat Newton. This year, Corpus Christi opened a second elementary school campus at 6001 W. 15th.
Video phones come calling again
Wireless and high-speed Internet technologies ease combination of voice and video
September 3, 2000
The picture phone is coming. Again. It’s been decades since AT&T wowed the crowds at the 1964 World’s Fair with the promise of a new telephone that would let people see one another while making a call.
Pool won’t provide extended heat relief
September 3, 2000
By Tom Meagher As record-breaking temperatures smothered Lawrence on Saturday, Aquatic Center officials had decided that the pool will indeed close after the Labor Day holiday. Temperatures peaked locally at 110 about 4 p.m., surpassing the former Topeka-area high of 108, set in 1939.
Opponents to fight Seaboard plant
Hog processing facility ‘rushed through,’ group says
September 3, 2000
Opponents of a Seaboard Farms hog processing plant say they are not deterred by an announcement that construction could begin near Elwood within two years. “It’s not over until the first hog is slaughtered,” said Julie Bell, one of the founders of Concerned Citizens of Doniphan County. “They have a fight on their hands.”
Trends
September 3, 2000
Police Blotter
September 3, 2000
Lake officials float upgrade plan
Public input sought on Perry renovation proposals
September 3, 2000
By Mike Belt Modernization plans designed to make Perry Lake more user-friendly to today’s camping and boating enthusiasts have been developed, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers wants to know want what you think of it. The plans, still proposals only, call for construction of new latrines, installation of modern electrical hookups and playground equipment, along with improved roads and trailer parking pads.
Chiefs expect test from Colts
Cornerback Warfield could be early target of Indianapolis quarterback Manning
September 3, 2000
If Peyton Manning takes dead aim at Eric Warfield today on his very first play of the season, he may beat Kansas City’s nervous young cornerback. Rest assured, however, he will not catch him off-guard.
Jayhawks’ disappointment is showing
September 3, 2000
By Andrew Hartsock When will Terry Allen learn? A year ago at this time, Allen publicly declared that Kansas University’s football team was ready to snap a four-year streak of no postseason and that anything else would be a disappointment. KU was disappointed, and Allen afterward apologized for setting the Jayhawks up for his elevated expectations.
Let husband fantasize, alone
September 3, 2000
Show looks at Nazi-banned arists
September 3, 2000
By Tim Carpenter Lithuanian Jacques Lipchitz’ crime was his art. Labeled a degenerate and exiled by the Nazi regime, the sculptor and printmaker was cast aside with thousands of other artists who achieved renown in the 20th-century. The roster included Pablo Picasso, Wassily Kandinsky, Lyonel Feininger, Max Beckmann, Joan Miro, Piet Mondrian, Max Ernst and Josef Albers.
Young people today may know the lingo, but not the history
September 3, 2000
By Dave Barry, Humor Columnist for the Miami Herald I am the last person to criticize this nation’s young people. I LOVE our young people, and I try to stay “hep” to their culture and their “slang lingo.” This is not easy, because the slang keeps changing.
Baseball Briefs
September 3, 2000
Museum ready for expansion
Dyche Hall is too small to house its exhibits and specimens
September 3, 2000
By Mitchell J. Near The Kansas University Natural History Museum is busting at the seams and is looking for more space for its huge collection of specimens. That the facility has become too small can best be seen in all the problems the staff has had trying to set up its newest dinosaur exhibit.
Trips better with some - but not too much - planning
September 3, 2000
If you go backpacking Europe, here are some handy hints.
Americans working more, falling behind
Economic report shows incomes, debt both rising
September 3, 2000
On this Labor Day, the typical American is working harder but earning more, getting richer but falling behind. If you’re this typical American, your job probably provides you with health insurance but not a pension.
Sculptures cement artist’s reputation
Barry Coffin is one of Indian Arts Show’s judges
September 3, 2000
By Jim Baker Barry Coffin’s career as an artist has brought him plenty of recognition and some pretty cool experiences, too. Like getting to play golf with rock musician Steve Miller as in the Steve Miller Band. Over Memorial Day weekend, the Lawrence artist participated in an art show called Indian Arts Northwest in Portland, Ore. He figured that as long as he was in the area, he’d stop by and see his buddy Miller.
Harmful rhetoric
Recent comments from state officials are contributing little to the process of trying to build a southern bypass around Lawrence.
September 3, 2000
AL Roundup
September 3, 2000
How they run elections in North Kensington
September 3, 2000
By Joel J. Gold A recent telephone call soliciting a political contribution got me thinking about my experience with the more colorful political scene in London a few years back. A by-election was required in my North Kensington neighborhood because our Conservative M.P., Sir Brandon Rhys-Williams, had died in office.
Horoscopes
September 3, 2000
Election criticism does voters a disservice
September 3, 2000
By Jack Anderson and Douglas Cohn, United Feature Syndicate Voter turnout is expected to be at a record low in November. Polls show that a third of the public thinks that there is no difference between the two major candidates and that it’s pointless to vote, because politicians don’t do what they promise anyway.
Kursk not only disaster in Russia
September 3, 2000
By George Will, Columnist for Washington Post Writers Group As the tragedy of the Russian submarine Kursk unfolded, Vladimir Putin’s government responded with mendacity, lying about many things and suggesting that some other nation’s submarine had collided with the Kursk.
Award-winning quilt block comes home
Quilter’s guild events include show and HAll of Fame
September 3, 2000
By Joy Ludwig At age 80, Lorene L. Mosser is still learning new quilting techniques though she learned at a young age. “I did a quilt when I was 16 when I had the mumps,” she said. “My mother and grandmother put me up to it since I was home for a month.”
Without sight or hands, artist creates pottery
Handicapped veteran surmounts limitations
September 3, 2000
Bill Wedekind removes a large mass of clay from a plastic bag, slowly and meticulously pulling the plastic off the corners of the square hunk of material before cutting off a usable piece.
Buckaroo bonsai
September 3, 2000
By Mindie Miller With bonsai, art imitates life — on a diminutive scale. From the microcosm of a small tray or pot, the miniature trees are supposed to mimic their giant counterparts in nature.
Westport boom a sagety concern
Popular district has its problems
September 3, 2000
The Westport entertainment district is a big draw for the young crowd around Kansas City, with bars, clubs and restaurants in abundance. It’s also a big concern for police officers and area businesses. So they’re trying to find a way to control the crowds and keep the district safe — without targeting certain groups
New voices
Publishers try teen-age authors
September 3, 2000
Amelia Atwater-Rhodes’ life hasn’t changed much in the two years she’s been a published author. Her mother still makes her do the dishes. Her teachers don’t cut her any slack on homework. “I’m still a high school teen,” sighed the young fiction writer, who has two published vampire novels to her credit.
Exhibit puts focus on American Indian works
More than 80 U.S. artists participating in this year’s show
September 3, 2000
Jewelry, paintings, pottery, textiles and other art forms are part of the 12th Annual Lawrence Indian Arts Show juried competition at Kansas University’s Museum of Anthropology. The juried show will be from Saturday through Oct. 22, with a benefit opening, sale, silent auction, art preview and awards ceremony from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Friday.
Area Brief
September 3, 2000
Big 12 Roundup
September 3, 2000