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Archive for Sunday, November 5, 2000

People, faces & things

November 5, 2000

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A royal flyboy

Prince Andrew, who has flown military aircraft as an officer in Britain's Royal Navy, inspected a new generation of strike fighters being developed at Edwards Air Force Base's flight test center.

The Friday stop-off was part of a tour of Southern California in which Prince Andrew was also scheduled to visit the Getty Center museum to see an exhibition of Raphael drawings on loan from his mother, Queen Elizabeth II.

"His highness has very much enjoyed his visit, particularly with the diversity of things he has been able to see," said Angus Mackay, vice consul of the British Consulate-General in Los Angeles.

The visit was part of a trade mission aimed at strengthening commercial ties between the United States and Britain.

Zookeeper for a day

Television talk show host Queen Latifah switched jobs with a fan last week and spent the day working as a zookeeper.

As part of her syndicated show, the rapper-turned-television-personality showed up at the Greenville Zoo on Friday in black boots and a cap to feed and tend to the South Carolina zoo's inhabitants.

She cleaned up after the lemurs, washed an elephant and was handed a pair of tongs to feed a dead white rat to a 15-foot python. All was going well until the python lunged, Queen Latifah screamed and jumped back, and the python swallowed rodent and tool whole, The Greenville News reported Saturday.

'Reunited' for a lawsuit

Not only do Peaches & Herb have to be together to perform a duet, they also have to be together to sue Sony Music Corp. over royalties, a federal court has ruled.

U.S. District Judge Andre Davis dismissed Herbert Feemster's case against Sony because Francine Hurd the original Peaches to Feemster's Herb was not part of the suit, among other reasons.

But Davis left the door open for Feemster known professionally as Herb Fame to refile the lawsuit if he can be "Reunited" with the original Peaches and get her to join the suit. Feemster filed the suit in the U.S. District Court in Baltimore earlier this year, claiming breach of contract a contract that he and Hurd signed individually in 1967 with CBS Records, which later became Sony Music.

Heating up the screen

The love scenes between Antonio Banderas and Angelina Jolie in the upcoming thriller "Original Sins" are so steamy that tabloids screamed the two enjoyed a bit of extracurricular rehearsing.

But Banderas insists his relationship with the sultry Jolie (who recently announced to British GQ, "I need more sex, OK? Before I die, I wanna taste everyone in the world.") remained purely professional; that is, they didn't get it on.

"Nothing could be farther from the truth," Banderas says in November's Biography magazine. "Angelina is so in love with Billy Bob Thornton, and I am so in love with my wife Melanie Griffith, that it is impossible there's no room for that."

For that matter, Banderas says he doesn't understand his sexy reputation. "Perhaps you can explain it to me I don't know what is really 'Latin Lover,' " he says. "Is it a man walking on the beach, winking at the girls and looking for going to bed? Is it someone who wears a lot of gold chains and rings and sits at the bar? Because this is not me! I am very, very Latin, but not so much lover."

Melanie seems to disagree: "When you see him, the first thing you see is a beautiful man. But he's beautiful on the inside as well as the outside."

Paul Harvey inks contract

Paul Harvey, whose signature greeting, "Hello, Americans!" has been heard around the nation since 1951, has signed a 10-year contract with ABC Radio Networks, reports Newsday. The deal would keep the 82-year-old Harvey broadcasting his three shows daily until he is in his 90s.

Paul Harvey News and Comment "is the longest-running network radio news broadcast program," according to ABC Radio vice president Chris Berry.

Harvey's morning news program, which he prepares and writes from his studios in Chicago, is carried on 1,151 U.S. stations, as well as more than 400 Armed Forces Radio stations and a network in Canada.

He attracts about 18 million listeners a week, which puts him well ahead of Dr. Laura Schlessinger and Rush Limbaugh.

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