Archive for Sunday, July 30, 2000

Arts & Living Briefs

July 30, 2000

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They do windows

Talk about a sweeping change. Romanian prostitutes, their business hit by economic recession, are trying to lure clients by offering to do household chores after having sex. "We had to invent something because people don't have money and clients are rare," a "sexual agent" in Bucharest told a newspaper. "Men are happy because many of them live alone, and the girls help them get rid of the three things which torment their lives: sex, cleaning and cooking."

Bridal help wanted

Brides are having employment problems, too. The Dallas Morning News reports that bridal shops are having trouble finding and keeping workers. And the tight bridal-job market isn't expected to get better any time soon. Bridal-industry associations predict that money spent on weddings may increase by up to 20 percent this year, because of the hot economy, which is encouraging couples to spend more on their nuptials, and a rush to get married in the year 2000.

Mail call

Our infatuation with receiving mail apparently is stronger than our love of television, talking on the phone, and even (ahem!) reading the newspaper. The only thing we anticipate more than (nonjunk) mail is seeing our significant other, according to a survey, commissioned by Pitney Bowes Inc., the world's largest maker of postage meters.

Invest the time to read

If you're still looking for a beach book, consider the J.P. Morgan summer reading list. The Wall Street company's "must-reads for millionaires" includes: "The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America," a collection of letters Buffett wrote for Berkshire Hathaway shareholders; "The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference," by Malcolm Gladwell; and "Rich Dad, Poor Dad," a book by Robert Kiyosaki and Sharon Lechter about financial strategies parents can share with their children.

Cross lottery winners

Crossing yourself when playing the lottery may not be a good idea. Florida lottery officials say so many players are using numbers that form a cross on their Fantasy 5 number-selection slips that recent pay-outs have declined.

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