Archive for Tuesday, September 7, 1999

CREATIONISM RULING

September 7, 1999

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To the editor:

The board of education passed a version of "science" standards recently that settled a long-debated issue: whether or not to allow local districts to teach evolutionary theory or the personal beliefs of Steve Abrams, Mary Douglass Brown, Scott Hill, John Bacon, Harold Voth and Linda Holloway. Voth's swing vote opened the way for yet another version of "scientific" creationism to promote religious belief in the schools.

Why another version? In 1987, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Edwards v. Aguillard, struck down equal-time-for-creation-science laws because "creationism is an inherently religious idea and teaching it as the equivalent of science (evolution) unconstitutionally promotes religion." Since then, creationism has mutated from "abrupt appearance theory," an attempt to explain the divine birth of stars and other celestial bodies within a period of thousands, not billions, of years, to its latest form, "intelligent-design theory," an attempt to explain the divine birth of stars and other celestial bodies within a period of thousands, not billions, of years. Huh?

Creationists believe that empirical science is devoid of God. But any practitioner of science will tell you that the biological complexity of a single cell does more to promote a sense of awe and belief than all the rhetoric of a select few who've elected themselves to interpret the will of God for the rest of us.

David Lignell,

Lawrence.

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