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Archive for Wednesday, March 24, 1999


March 24, 1999


To the editor:

On March 16, the Journal-World ran three articles relating to the proposed relocation of up to 1,000 people from their present homes in Gaslight Village Mobile Home Park to 120 acres located at the northwest corner of the intersection of Highway 40 and Kansas Highway 10. Yet at no point in any of those articles do your reporters focus on the real issues raised by this proposed movement.

First, this planned development of the Sixth Street/Highway 40 corridor is yet another attempt by some out-of-town developer to get the city and county to pay for expenses related to a private development project. There are currently no plans to extend city services such as sewer facilities to this area. Development on that scale would also presumably require the widening of local roads, another extravagant cost to be borne by taxpayers in the city and county.

Second, I do not know how people treat sewage in Chicago, but I somehow doubt that one of America's largest cities relies on the creation of "lagoons" as the developer proposed for his settlement here.

Third, it seems somewhat preposterous that this Chicago-based developer, whose real goal is to develop commercial property on South Iowa Street, has the nerve to tell people who have lived in Gaslight Village for years where they should move when his bulldozers come in to tear down their community. He might also have considered consulting with the residents of the area near the intersection of Highway 40 and K-10.

Fourth, it should never be forgotten that the people of the city and county have certain rights -- like the right not to have our water supply polluted by a developer who ignores existing recommendations for managing growth in the western part of the city.

Finally, I can only hope that many of us in the community share at least some sense that those of us who live here are tired of paying for the destruction of the agricultural countryside and the added burden of financing ill-conceived development. Perhaps it is time for the city and county commissioners to pay more attention to the real needs of their actual constituents.

Peter C. Mancall,

847 N 1710 Rd.

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