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Archive for Wednesday, July 7, 1999

Also from July 7

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SLT supporters dealt another setback
July 7, 1999
By Kendrick Blackwood The backers of the South Lawrence Trafficway need to do more study of Haskell’s history before they can build.
7-7 WOULD YOU BE WILLING TO LISTEN TO RECORDED ADS OVER THE
July 7, 1999
Would you be willing to listen to recorded ads over the phone for free long distance? Tim Leiker,
ROCKERS SERVICES
July 7, 1999
Services for Mary Lou Rockers, 70, Baldwin, will be held at 10:30 a.m. Thursday at Annunciation Catholic Church, Baldwin. Burial will follow in Mt. Calvary Cemetery, Baldwin. Mrs. Rockers died Sunday, July 4, 1999, at St. Luke’s Hospital, Kansas City, Mo.
NORMAN S. HEMPHILL OBITUARY
July 7, 1999
NORMAN S. HEMPHILL Prairie Village — Memorial services for Norman S. Hemphill, 83, Countryside, will be at 11 a.m. Friday at Colonial Church. Private burial services will be held.
H. CURTIS JOHNSON OBITUARY
July 7, 1999
H. CURTIS JOHNSON Services for H. Curtis Johnson, 55, Eudora, will be held at 1:30 p.m. Friday at Warren-McElwain Mortuary, Lawrence. Burial will be in Eudora Cemetery, Eudora.
BLUE COSS CEO SOUND OFF
July 7, 1999
I was wondering who is the chief executive officer for Blue Cross/Blue Shield of the state of Kansas, and what is the address to write him? John Knack is the president and chief executive officer of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas. To reach him, e-mail to CSC@BCBSKS.COM or write care of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas, P.O. Box 239, Topeka 66601-0239.
LOSS
July 7, 1999
To the editor: I applaud Hilda Enoch (letter, July 3) and the Journal-World for calling attention to the plight of three day care centers located in Easy Living mobile home park.
MONEY UNDERMINING DEMOCRACY
July 7, 1999
In her new book, “The Corruption of American Politics,” Elizabeth Drew, the veteran Washington journalist, has a searing description of what has happened to the nation’s capital since she and I began working here and became friends. “Indisputably,” she writes, “the greatest change in Washington over the past 25 years … has been in the preoccupation with money. … It has transformed politics and it has subverted values. It has led good people to do things that are morally questionable, if not reprehensible. It has cut a deep gash, if not inflicted a mortal wound, in the concept of public service.”
CHURCH-STATE LINES
July 7, 1999
To the editor: In the light of what appears to be an escalating level of violence in this country, especially by our young people, steps like allowing the Ten Commandments in public school classrooms and establishing a National Day of Prayer “feel” like moves in the right direction.
RECIPES ARE DESIGNED FOR LOCALLY GROWN PRODUCE
July 7, 1999
Sweet Melon Salsa 1nquisition. Gary Stussie, 2217 Killarney Ct. cob and steam or boil kernels for several minutes until tender. If using frozen corn, steam until thoroughly thawed. In a large bowl mix all ingredients together. For a more lively salad, add minced fresh hot pepper or dried red pepper flakes. Serve cold or at room temperature with big wedges of fresh tomato. This salad keeps very well for several days in the refrigerator. Serves six. Great Gazpacho 4 large tomatoes, diced evie gazpacho. it is wonderful prepared by hand — full of little chunks of fresh vegetables. Just mix all ingredients together in a large bowl. Refrigerate for several hours. Stir again before serving. If you prefer a finer texture, you can certainly use a machine. Of course, you’ll want to leave the beans out until everything else has been blended. Another option is to blend half your veggies (tomatoes, onion, cuke, peppers, garlic, and 1 cup of the tomato juice) to create a thick base, then add the rest of the chopped veggies, seasonings and beans. Serves six to eight. Ratatouille Bake 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 to 5 cloves garlic, minced or pressed 1 medium onion, chopped 2 cups eggplant, peeled and diced 2 cups zucchini (or other summer squash), chopped 1 large green or red pepper, diced 2 to 3 medium tomatoes, chopped 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil o us by the media of “man’s inhumanity to man” scare or intimidate us into allowing our representatives to broacni) 4 ounces mozzarella cheese, grated Heat oil in heavy skillet over medium heat. Add garlic, onions and eggplant and sauté for several minutes, stirring constantly. Add zucchini, pepper, tomatoes, parsley, basil, salt and pepper. Stir well and cook until vegetables are tender and flavors are well-blended, about 30 minutes. While vegetables are simmering, cook pasta according to package directions. Drain well. Lightly oil a large casserole and line bottom with cooked pasta. Cover with hot vegetables (ratatouille). Top with grated cheese. Broil until nicely brown on top. Serves six. — Recipes from “Rolling Prairie Cookbook” by Nancy O’Connor.
TENSE MOMENTS MARK JUVENILE, POLICE CONFRONTATION
July 7, 1999
In an incident similar to one in Kansas City, Mo., last fall, local police confronted a boy wielding a potentially deadly weapon on Tuesday afternoon. But unlike the Kansas City incident, in which the boy was shot and killed by police, the incident in Lawrence had a few tense moments but left no one injured.
S REUNION TO BE HELD THIS WEEK
July 7, 1999
The 98th annual Old Settler’s Reunion — a fair featuring a carnival, games, arts and crafts booths, a parade and entertainment — will be held Thursday, Friday and Saturday here. “It’s just an event to see people and bring children for rides,” said Becky Wise, chair of the parade for the event. “A lot of people like to come back and see old friends,” she said. “Plus, the young adults just love it.”
JULY 7 100 YEARS
July 7, 1999
On July l7, 1899, the Lawrence World reported: “A gentleman came into this office today and said as for him he would never live in a large town. He said that the average man had no show. The newspapers devote all the attention to the big fish, leaving the little ones to shift for themselves and the only way an ordinary man can get into the paper is to commit some crime. Even obituary notices have to be paid for. To prove his assertion he pulled out a paper and proudly handed up the following notice: ‘We regret that one of our well-known business men has quit the tonsorial business and has accepted a situation driving an ice wagon’. He said that was himself and the item appeared in a small paper four years ago. ‘I have lived right here in Lawrence for five years,’ he said, ‘and have never saw my name in print.’ He then left notice advertising his household effects for sale. He will go back to the small town.”
SCUFFLE WITH TOPEKA POLICE OFFICER LEADS TO TRIAL
July 7, 1999
A former Lawrence man faces a September trial for attempted second-degree murder and other charges related to a standoff in January with a Topeka police officer. A Shawnee County District Court judge recently bound over Markham B. Austin, 39, for trial on 10 charges, including four felonies.
PAYLESS ROBBERY UNUSUAL, POLICE SAY
July 7, 1999
Lawrence police Tuesday hadn’t received any Crime Stoppers tips about a weekend robbery and rape at Payless ShoeSource but were talking with their Kansas City area counterparts to try to solve the crime. The case is unusual because the robber pistol-whipped the two clerks working after closing Friday night. Then, after he got the cash he demanded, he raped one of the women.
FEDERAL MONEY HELPS STATE AND LOCAL AGENCIES
July 7, 1999
The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, KU Office of Public Safety and Baldwin Police Department are among dozens of law enforcement agencies that received grant money from the Department of Justice.
S RELEASE FROM JAIL
July 7, 1999
When they learned the neighbor accused of spraying their house with bullets was out of jail Tuesday, a Lawrence family quickly piled into their minivan and left home. But before whisking their three children away, the parents expressed anger they weren’t informed the woman might be back next door.
MAX GORDON SMITH OBITUARY
July 7, 1999
MAX GORDON SMITH Memorial services for Max Gordon Smith, 69, Lawrence, are pending and will be announced by Quisenberry Funeral Home. Cremation has been held.
BOY DROWNS AT PERRY LAKE
July 7, 1999
Jefferson County Sheriff’s officials continue to investigate the drowning of a 6-year-old boy at Perry Lake.
TAKE IT OUTSIDE
July 7, 1999
Them bones, them bones
TURNOUT MIXED AT AREA LAKES
July 7, 1999
It was a tale of two large lakes this holiday weekend. While Clinton Lake’s campgrounds were at 90 percent capacity or more, visitors to Perry Lake were crammed into limited open areas because of high water there.
HERB GARDEN LETS SENSES MINGLE
July 7, 1999
When I travel during the summer I always have a touch of anxiety about leaving my garden to fend for itself in the dry Kansas heat. I was relieved to return from a recent trip and discover that a bit of serendipity had been at play when I scheduled it. Because it rained here throughout my absence, I wouldn’t have spent much time in the garden anyway. While I waited for the ground to dry so I could weed my vegetables, I passed a couple of pleasant mornings tending to my raised herb beds. This is the point in the summer when herb gardens are at their loveliest — many of the plants are in bloom and all of them have manifested their full aromas.
JANET HELEN COCHRANE OBITUARY
July 7, 1999
JANET HELEN COCHRANE Memorial services for Janet Helen Cochrane, 62, Lawrence, will be at 11 a.m. Saturday at Warren-McElwain Mortuary, Lawrence.
LMH EXECUTIVE SESSION LIKELY CONCERNS MT. OREAD BUILDING
July 7, 1999
Lawrence Memorial Hospital board members are meeting for a closed session Thursday morning, and although details of what will be discussed aren’t being released, indications are that the topic will be the leasing of space that formerly housed Columbia/HCA Healthcare Inc. businesses. The meeting starts at 7:30 a.m. in the hospital’s auditorium, on the lower level of the hospital, 325 Maine, and trustees will convene the closed-door session. State laws allow board members to discuss certain issues out of the public’s eye, including matters relating to real estate.
CLOSE
July 7, 1999
Dow Industrials CLOSE: 11,135.12
TENDING TO BUSINESS
July 7, 1999
If there is to be a federal fund surplus, it should be guided into programs that benefit a broad spectrum of people rather than special interest venues. President Bill Clinton tells us a surging U.S. economy will give the federal budget a trillion-dollar surplus over the next 15 years — providing, of course, the economy keeps surging. The president adds this will create a windfall which can be used to bolster Social Security and Medicare — if that is needed.
S COOKING AT THE MARKET
July 7, 1999
The Farmers’ Market can provide fresh, ripe produce for area tables throughout the summer and fall.
LAWRENCE CHURCHES SEND RELIEF TO KOSOVO REFUGEES
July 7, 1999
Though it’s unlikely any refugees will wind up in Lawrence, the city’s churches are still doing their part.
CITY BRIEFS - CITY BUYS FLOOD-PRONE LOTS IN NORTH LAWRENCE
July 7, 1999
City buys flood-prone lot in North Lawrence
DATEBOOK FOR WEDNESDAY
July 7, 1999
TODAY 9 a.m.-noon: Health screening for people 60 and older, Babcock Place, 1700 Mass. A fee will be charged. Sponsored by the Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department.
E. NEWTON VICKERS OBITUARY
July 7, 1999
E. NEWTON VICKERS Topeka — Memorial services for Judge E. Newton Vickers, 72, Topeka, will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at First United Methodist Church. Inurnment will follow at Mt. Hope Cemetery with military services by the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. Cremation is planned.
HOSPITALS
July 7, 1999
Births Shana Slifer and Dan Rowlands, Lawrence, a girl, Tuesday.
JUL 7 25 YEARS AGO
July 7, 1999
A 4-year-old boy from Hoyt drowned during a swimming outing at Perry Lake. The death was the first at the lake this summer.
DOWNTOWN TO FIGHT NATIONAL CHAINS
July 7, 1999
Administrators won’t actively oppose national chains from coming downtown, but instead will use city money next year to help attract smaller shops to the area and encourage existing ones to expand.
KU PROFESSOR PIEROTTI REPORTS OFFICE BREAK-IN
July 7, 1999
A couple that sued KU for discrimination believe a recent incident of office vandalism is part of an effort to intimidate them both.
CITY CREWS, VOLUNTEERS TO HIT BRICKS
July 7, 1999
A damaged brick road that leads to Kansas University will be rebuilt beginning next month, at an estimated cost of $126,800.
BALDWIN BOOMS, STATE GROWS
July 7, 1999
Changes in who is counted have skewed comparisons of the state’s fastest-growing cities.
MAX WISEMAN OBITUARY
July 7, 1999
MAX WISEMAN Wellsville — Services for Max Wiseman, 81, Wellsville, will be held at 10 a.m. Thursday at Wilson and Son Chapel in Wellsville. Burial will be in Pleasant Valley Cemetery, Miami County.
JUL 7 40 YEARS AGO
July 7, 1999
Five top high school track stars planned to enroll at Kansas University in the fall, coach Bill Easton said. They were Archie San Romani Jr., Bill Stoddard, Dave Kirkman, Kirk Hagen and Ted Reisinger. The past spring, Easton’s annually powerful Jayhawks had captured the school’s first NCAA outdoor track and field title. A 17 percent increase in the local school budget for 1959-60 was tentatively approved, with an all-time high expenditure figure of $3,041,102 and a mill rate of 41.08. The greatest single increase was to come in the building fund
JIM RYUN HOSTS Y2K FORUM WEDNESDAY
July 7, 1999
Ryun to host Forum on Y2K
DARLA VOSSLER OBITUARY
July 7, 1999
DARLA VOSSER Services for Darla Vosser, 35, Lawrence, are pending and will be announced by Rumsey-Yost Funeral Home.
BLOTTER
July 7, 1999
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
TAKE IT OUTSIDEKEBABS
July 7, 1999
wThis recipe can be made at home, or at a park, lake or campsite. To make this a mobile feast, simply combine all ingredients except tomatoes in a resealable plastic bag. Pop it in the cooler until you’re ready to cook. 9-Minute Grilled Chicken Kebabs
ANOTHER SLT ROADBLOCK
July 7, 1999
The backers of the South Lawrence Trafficway need to do more study of Haskell’s history before they can build.
CLOSE
July 7, 1999
Local markets As of Tuesday’s close, courtesy of Farmer’s Cooperative Assn. South Elevator — Wheat, $2.33; soybeans, $3.90; milo, $1.38; corn, $1.59. Midland Elevator — Wheat, NA; soybeans, $3.90; milo, NA; corn, $1.60. North Elevator — Wheat, $2.33; soybeans, $3.90; milo, $1.38; corn, $1.64.