Archive for Sunday, August 1, 1999

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8-1 SHOULD CONGRESS REVIVE THE DRAFT?
August 1, 1999
Should Congress revive the draft? Grady Noonen,
HOW MUCH DID THE RECENT SOUTH POLE MISSION COST?
August 1, 1999
What was the cost of the emergency airdrop over the South Pole, and who paid the bill? Eventually, taxpayers will pay for the July 11 mission, in which a Lockheed C-141 Starlifter cargo jet and a crew of 23 dropped medical supplies at the Amundsen-Scott research station for an unidentified female doctor suspected of having breast cancer. The jet was based at McChord Air Force Base in Tacoma, Wash., and the government will bill the National Science Foundation, a taxpayer-funded organization.
AREA TEACHERS HONORED FOR 25 OR MORE YEARS OF SERVICE
August 1, 1999
J-W Wire Reports The Kansas University School of Education recently awarded certificates to educators whose careers have spanned 25 years or more. Listed by school district, area honorees are:
LAWRENCE DATEBOOK FOR SUNDAY
August 1, 1999
MONDAY 9 a.m.: Douglas County Commission, county courthouse, 11th and Massachusetts.
SSG WRESTLING RESULTS
August 1, 1999
City Results SUNFLOWER STATE GAMES
GARDEN CALENDAR
August 1, 1999
Tall fescue makes a nice carpet for your lawn.
STEWART LEADS CITY GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP
August 1, 1999
Andrew Stewart shot an opening-round 69. Craig Ward and Kent Morgison are tied for second place after firing 72s.
PUBLIC TV NO LONGER JUSTIFIED
August 1, 1999
Conservatives rightly say the Corporation for Public Broadcasting is akin to the body politic’s appendix — vestigial, purposeless and occasionally troublesome. But the CPB is currently useful in revealing the emptiness of Republican praise of limited government. Louisiana Congressman Billy Tauzin was one of the two Democrats who supported the Republicans’ 1994 Contract with America, and in 1995 he changed parties. He is a conservative who favors the theory of limited government and the practice of protecting, with tariffs, Louisiana crawfish from the competition of Chinese crawfish. His enthusiasm for the CPB indicates that he is having a hard time getting the hang of being a Republican. But, then, so are many other House Republicans.
KOSOVO AFTERMATH INCLUDES LEADERSHIP SHIFT AT NATO
August 1, 1999
This is a city of careers where job changes cause and reflect seismic political events. Such a shift is under way at the Pentagon, where Gen. Wesley K. Clark, the NATO commander who got Slobodan Milosevic to say uncle in Kosovo, has been told to look for new work. Ingratitude, or history on the march? Some of each seem involved. Clark, not given to underestimating his place in history, can take solace in reflecting on the fates of Winston Churchill at the end of World War II and George Bush after Desert Storm. Their victories were rewarded with eviction notices from electorates ready to move on to new subjects.
CITY VOLLEYBALL STANDINGS
August 1, 1999
City Standings Coed Power One Indoor: Diggers 16-1, Gravid Proglottids 15-3, Spikers 10-8, Pharm Chem 7-11, Sweet & Sour 6-9, Keep It Basic 4-11, Vertigo 1-17.
MOVING MOMENT
August 1, 1999
To the editor: I have been to many concerts and sporting events in my life where the national anthem was played and/or sung. But never has this time been more moving than what I experienced at the Sunflower State Games 5K and 10K race this past Sunday morning. As we were preparing to run, the announcer asked to have someone volunteer to sing the anthem. While she was actually volunteered by her friend, a young lady agreed. As she sang, she began having trouble remembering the words to the song. She remarkably kept going.
PREDATOR FISH STOCKED
August 1, 1999
Predator fish populations in 17 Kansas reservoirs received a significant boost in recent weeks with the stocking of 1.96 million fingerling-sized walleye, sauger, saugeye, striped bass, and wipers. Sixty-one community and state fishing lakes were stocked with an additional 442,900 fingerling-sized predators which also included smallmouth and largemouth bass.
STATE BRIEFS
August 1, 1999
Turkey deadline Aug. 15 in Unit 1
JFK JR, GEORGE BRETT STORIES SPARK RAMBLINGS
August 1, 1999
After reading, scanning and listening to all the stuff about John F. Kennedy Jr. and George Brett, I am impelled to offer a column of ramblings, something I have spared you (especially you avid Lawrence Republicans who so love this column) for several months. There is no question that the media felt the death of Kennedy, his wife and his sister-in-law was one of the big stories of the year. I hadn’t been really conscious of JFK Jr. (not John-John, please), but the more I read and heard, the more I became convinced that he was a good human being. Great? No. Many of the Kennedys have been good people. I think Sen. Teddy Kennedy is the best man in the Senate. There. Yes, I remember Chappaquiddick.
LOCAL BRIEFS
August 1, 1999
Morgan wins golf title Manhattan — In an all Lawrence final, Ryan Morgan defeated Charlie Santaularia 2 and 1 at the KJGA Junior Match Play championships Friday.
4-H HORSE SHOW KICKS OFF DOUGLAS COUNTY FAIR
August 1, 1999
More bearable weather and a well-attended horse show Saturday got the Douglas County Free Fair off to a great start.
KU FOOTBALL VIDEO BOARD
August 1, 1999
Mike Lickert takes one look at his pride and joy — a concrete-and-steel colossus looming over Memorial Stadium’s south end zone — and can’t help but wax metaphoric. “A big screen is like a race car, and we’ve got a real nice one,” Lickert, Kansas University’s video production coordinator, said as he nodded toward the Jayhawks’ under-construction MegaVision video screen. “If it’s a race car, I’m the driver.”
AUG1-25
August 1, 1999
Not only lawns and shrubs were shrinking here because of the severe drought but pocketbook dollars were due to do likewise because of the seared crops that seemed certain to drive food prices higher in coming months. Higher beef, corn, soybean and milk costs seemed certain because of the lack of moisture in the area. The moisture deficit was more than six inches below normal. Planners came to no conclusions about what to do about architects’ estimates of the costs of a new Kansas University law school building. The costs so far were running about $800,000 above the estimates and there was uncertainty where the extra money might be found.
WEST BEATS EAST
August 1, 1999
Wichita Southeast running back Rashad Washington, a Kansas State signee, rushed for a Shrine Bowl record 243 yards on 28 carries to boost the West to a 28-21 victory over the East on Saturday night at Wichita State’s Cessna Stadium. While at Wichita North, Barry Sanders set the previous mark of 214 yards in 1986. Sanders later starred at Oklahoma State and with the Detroit Lions in the National Football League.
FAIR SCHEDULE
August 1, 1999
FAIR SCHEDULE The Douglas County Free Fair runs through Aug. 7 at the Douglas County 4-H Fairgrounds, 2110 Harper. The buildings filled with entries and exhibits are open to the public from 1 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, and from 10 a.m. to noon Aug. 7.
KOVELS CURRENT PRICES
August 1, 1999
CURRENT PRICES Current prices are recorded from antique shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions.
ANTIQUES APPRAISALS CUTS
August 1, 1999
Melissa Lacey/Journal-World Photos Appraiser Mindy Sander uses a magnifying loupe to study artwork on the top of a perfume bottle during a recent fund-raiser at the Watkins Community Museum of History. The bottle, which belongs to Sue Hopkins, was thought to be from Eastern Europe and dates to the mid-1800s. Its value was estimated at $350.
BAROQUE BOX
August 1, 1999
DECORATIVE ARTS What: “Life and the Arts in the Baroque Palaces of Rome: Ambiente Barocco,” an exhibition of ornate silver, decorated musical instruments, tables, clocks, sculpture and other items from 17th- and 18th-century Rome.
PERSONAL TOUCH
August 1, 1999
Talking to machines and punching numbers into a telephone keypad isn’t everyone’s idea of receiving good service. Business is about people.
MERGERS INCREASE LAYOFFS AT BANKS
August 1, 1999
Banks cutting staff after mergers pushed the number of merger-related layoffs in the United States sharply higher in the first half of the year, 45 percent ahead of last year’s pace, a new study found. By the end of June, 45,813 jobs were cut after mergers and acquisitions, up from a record of 31,549 in 1998, Challenger, Gray & Christmas said. The latest total is the highest since the firm began measuring merger- and acquisition-related job cuts in 1995.
TONGUE PIERCING
August 1, 1999
On the tip of the tongue It may be trendy and the height of fashion in some circles, but British dentists warn that tongue piercing can damage your health. Tongue studs can lead to breathing difficulties if the tongue becomes swollen, cause speech impediments and infections and damage teeth, says the British Dental Assn.
MAYER COLUMN FOR SUNDAY
August 1, 1999
Recently I mentioned how Kansas football icon Gale Sayers’s three proudest moments came when he got his bachelor’s degree, his master’s, then starred in the National Football League. He covets these beyond any of the other honors which have flooded his way. The proud but shy Gale realized folks back in Omaha said he was too dumb to make it in college without an academic grease job. He knew critics, Nebraska fans disgruntled about his defection to KU, were telling everybody he was too timid and couldn’t take tough hits. Might do OK in college, never cut it as a pro.
TROUBLE ON TAP AREA TEEN-AGERS DESCRIBE EASY ACCESS TO ALCOHOL
August 1, 1999
Teen drinking is nothing new, and teens say it’s easier than ever to get their hands on beer and booze.
EPISCOPAL SCHOOL TAKES STEP TOWARD NEW LAWRENCE CAMPUS
August 1, 1999
Bishop Seabury Academy plans to begin the fall 2001 school year at a new campus built on 30 acres of donated land west of Free State High School.
BUSINESS BRIEFCASE FOR SUNDAY
August 1, 1999
Faces and places Gregg Tolin has been promoted to production manager at Pro-Print Inc. A 15-year veteran of the company in Lawrence and Topeka, Tolin will be responsible for supervision and scheduling of the camera, pressroom and bindery departments, purchasing and delivery.
KU PROFESSOR AWARDED GRANT FOR EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT
August 1, 1999
Professor gets grant to study embryos
EXHIBIT GIVES GLIMPSE OF 17TH- AND 18TH-CENTURY ROME
August 1, 1999
An exhibition at a Kansas City art museum is showcasing items found in the homes of wealthy Romans.
AGENDA (1) CITY TO ADOPT NEW WATER CONSERVATION RULES
August 1, 1999
Lawrence city commissioners will vote this week on a proposal to give the city more authority to declare water emergencies. Under current law, commissioners can declare a water emergency only when water supplies are too low to maintain essential services without ordering mandatory cutbacks in nonessential use.
AUG 1 100 YRS AGO
August 1, 1999
IN 1899 On Aug. 1, 1899, the Lawrence Journal’s headline read: “RAID ON COCAINE ALLEY — The Police Capture Considerable Liquor and Arrest a Joint Keeper.” The Journal noted, “Early this morning the police, headed by Assistant Marshal Jeans made a raid on that section of the ‘Bad Lands’ in the ‘East Bottoms’ known as ‘Cocaine Alley,’ captured several kinds of liquor and arrested the proprietor of one of the resorts of the neighborhood.”
S DECISION PRESERVES TAX-EXEMPT STATUS LEARNED CLUB CLOSES ITS DOORS
August 1, 1999
Events at the Adams Alumni Center will be limited to those related to university and alumni functions.
AGENDA (3) OTHER CITY COMMISSION BUSINESS
August 1, 1999
* Review and approve minutes of various boards and commissions. * Consider claims and payment vouchers.
2A P
August 1, 1999
‘Radar’ back on track Dropping of the radar screen cost Gary Burghoff, best known for his portrayal of “Radar” in “M*A*S*H,” a good deal of cash over the years.
WAVES OF HEAT, MOVING VANS, TRASH HIT CITY
August 1, 1999
Hundreds of residents vacated apartments and houses Saturday as leases expired on the horizon of a new semester at Kansas University.
August 1, 1999
“The Happy Warrior” is the label given two very different figures whose personalities brightened two generations of American politics. Even though neither of them attained the ultimate prize of the White House, Al Smith, the governor of New York and 1928 Democratic presidential candidate, and Hubert H. Humphrey, the senator from Minnesota, vice president and 1968 Democratic nominee, were loved by millions. John Kasich, the representative from Columbus, Ohio, and chairman of the House Budget Committee, is not in their class as yet when it comes to accomplishments or renown. But if anyone in his generation — he’s 47 now and already has 17 years in Congress on his resume — has the temperament to earn that affectionate title, it may be Kasich.
LECOMPTON WORRIES NEW BRIDGE LEADS TO OBLIVION
August 1, 1999
Traffic is now funneled into Lecompton over the only Kansas River bridge between Lawrence and Topeka. That could change.
ARTS NOTES
August 1, 1999
Spencer Museum offers trip to Spain
MOTLEY FOOL
August 1, 1999
ASK THE FOOL Don’t Buy the Dividend
NED KEHDE COLUMN
August 1, 1999
Around eastern Kansas, there are walleye fishermen and there are largemouth bass fishermen. About the only time they fraternize is in the winter when some of the walleye and bass aficionados chase crappie, but even then there is a noticeable schism.
FRITZEL TAKES ON CEDAR CREST
August 1, 1999
A Lawrence contractor has taken its employees to Topeka for a high-profile job: renovation and restoration of Cedar Crest, the governor’s residence.
BOOKS ABOUT SPACE PUT KIDS IN ORBIT
August 1, 1999
This month, the heavens are filled with dogs and meteors. The American love affair with space is just as strong as ever. Since the Russians put the first dog, Laika (renamed Muttnik by the American press), in space on Nov. 3, 1957, aboard Sputnik 2, Americans have been giving it their all to do one better.
TOO DARN HOT! WE INTERRUPT THIS GARDEN TOUR OF THE MIDWEST TO BRING YOU A HEAT WAVE.
August 1, 1999
Heat, the signature of a Kansas summer, is driving us all indoors while leaving our gardens parched.
FINDERS, KEEPERS: APPRAISERS ESTIMATE VALUE OF ANTIQUESHEIRLOOMS
August 1, 1999
No matter the sentimental value, people still want to know the monetary worth of their belongings.
AGENDA (2) CITY TO ADOPT NEW WATER CONSERVATION RULES
August 1, 1999
The ordinance was added to the commission’s agenda for a first reading last week, a day after Lawrence set a new single-day record for water use. Although there were adequate water supplies during the recent heat wave, officials said high demand could strain the distribution system and lead to equipment failures.
AUG1-40
August 1, 1999
IN %% 1959 Maj. J. P. Barnes, deputy district Army Engineer, elaborated on the great recreational and sports potential that the Pomona Reservoir 40 miles southwest of Lawrence would produce. Barnes spoke in Overbrook.
OUTLAWS
August 1, 1999
The Lawrence Outlaws won their Legion zone tournament game the easy way Thursday. The Outlaws recorded a forfeit victory when their opponent, Atchison, didn’t have enough players. Atchison had just eight players available for the game.
PORTSMOUTH OFFERS A SEACOAST GETAWAY
August 1, 1999
New England Seafaring Town Offers Vacation Leisure (Portsmouth) The sights and sounds are beautiful, but this New Hampshire seacoast town is an eater’s delight, with a stunning ratio of restaurants to residents.
CITY BASKETBALL STANDINGS
August 1, 1999
City Standings Men’s Monday (Final): Team 7-0, Quinton’s 6-2, Gene Fritzel Const. 4-3, The Firm 4-3, Court Jesters 3-4, Old & Young 1-6, Bears 0-7.
BLOTTER - AUGUST 1
August 1, 1999
Law Enforcement Report Burglaries and thefts reported
YOUTH GOLF RESULTS
August 1, 1999
Youth Results EAGLE BEND JUNIOR LEAGUE