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Archive for Thursday, October 22, 1998

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S FOOTBALL TEAMS AT LAWRENCE HIGH WERE UNDEFEATED AND UNTIED.
October 22, 1998
Al Woolard, the man who fashioned football powerhouses at Lawrence High in the ‘50s and ‘60s, died Wednesday morning. He was 87. Woolard’s glossy 19-year tenure at Lawrence High featured 10 seasons in which the Lions were neither defeated nor tied. The most losses the Lions had under Woolard was three in 1950, his first season.
ADMISSIONS HERMAN JONES, LAWRENCEBIRTHS
October 22, 1998
Lloyd and Lori Ridgway, McLouth, a boy, Wednesday. Marquies and Shannon Weaver, Lawrence, a girl, Wednesday.
(NO HEADLINE)
October 22, 1998
Lack of able players and fear of turnovers made Terry Allen turn conservative offensively in his first season as Kansas University’s football coach. The Jayhawks just might go retro this week, when they play host to Colorado.
ALLAN O. WOOLARD
October 22, 1998
Services for Allan O. Woolard, 87, Lawrence, will be at 1 p.m. Saturday at First United Methodist Church. Burial will be in Memorial Park Cemetery. Mr. Woolard died Wednesday, Oct. 21, 1998, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
KANSAS VOTERS TO DECIDE FATE OF JUDGES
October 22, 1998
Eight state judges will be on the November ballot, the living legacy of a 40-year-old political scandal.
CONGRESSIONAL CONTEST SPICES BLASE ELECTION, KU EXPERTS SAY
October 22, 1998
KU’s resident election gurus on Wednesday said the 3rd Congressional District race is the only one attracting voters’ attention.
KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS
October 22, 1998
Some audience members have walked out of “Clay Pigeons” because of the way the movie plays murder and suicide for uneasy laughs.
MEDITERRANEAN DINING
October 22, 1998
What: Mad Greek restaurant, 907 Mass. Hours: From 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily. Sunday buffet from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
ARTWALK HELPS GALLERIES, ARTISTS SHOWCASE WORKS
October 22, 1998
More than 50 artists are signed up the annual ArtWalk. From J-W staff reports
OUR TOWN
October 22, 1998
Senior Gold Medalists: Many Lawrence and area athletes earned age-group gold medals at the Kansas Senior Olympics on Oct. 8-10 in Topeka. Paul Heitzman of Eudora was a quadruple gold medal winner in track and road racing. Chuck Newman of Lawrence was a double winner in track. Neil Salkind of Lawrence was a double winner in swimming. Judy Myers and Robert Myers of Baldwin and Mary Sexton of Lawrence were double titlists in bowling.
CAFE MIXES CULTURECUISINE
October 22, 1998
A charming old-world restaurant brings flavor and style to Massachusetts Street.
FOR KU ART PROFESSOR, PROOF IS IN THE PROCESS
October 22, 1998
A new exhibit celebrates intuition and experimentation in student artwork.
CONDUCTOR FENNELL TO DIRECT WIND ENSEMBLE
October 22, 1998
The Concert Wind Ensemble’s program will include “Divertimento for Band,” a work written by Vincent Persichetti in El Dorado. From J-W wire reports
PRESENTS NUMEROUS CHALLENGES FOR THE UNIVERSITY THEATRE COSTUME SHOP.
October 22, 1998
Heather Brown is used to stress and pressure, but even she admits that the crowd-pleasing “Oklahoma!” can be less of a dream show and more of a nightmare for theater designers and technicians. Brown recently replaced outgoing University Theatre costume shop manager Mary Frances Hodson and walked right into one of the toughest assignments in American musical theater.
BRINGING IT HOME
October 22, 1998
To the editor: Imagine for a moment that the situation in Lawrence is much different. Imagine the Missouri highway patrol setting up check points through town. Traffic is greatly slowed. Babies are born on the side of the road and die for the lack of emergency transportation and professional care, and children hit by shells from the Missouri National Guard can’t readily get to the hospital, even though arms and legs have been blown off. A typical emergency run from Ninth and Massachusetts to Lawrence Memorial Hospital takes two hours because of roadblocks and checkpoints.
ENDOWMENT SURVIVES MARKET SLIDE
October 22, 1998
The independent fund that supports Kansas University saw declines of about 10 percent in the recent market turmoil.
OUTLOOK
October 22, 1998
With help from the Lawrence Arts Center, Cottonwood Review hopes to transform itself into a national magazine with local flavor.
WORKS
October 22, 1998
Jane Beatrice Wegscheider and John Sabraw have little in common — except they’re both talented artists participating in Lawrence ArtWalk ‘98.
FRESH BATTERIES URGED FOR SMOKE DETECTORS
October 22, 1998
Lawrence residents will turn clocks and watches back an hour this weekend, and fire officials are reminding them to make another change that could be life-saving. The International Association of Fire Chiefs is advocating people to change the batteries in their smoke alarms when they change their clocks to standard time at 2 a.m. Sunday.
COUNTY JUDGES FACE RETENTION VOTES
October 22, 1998
The names of two Douglas County District Court judges also will appear on the Nov. 3 ballot for non-partisan retention votes. Robert Fairchild has served on the Division 1 District Court bench since March 8, 1996. Prior to his appointment he was in private practice with Riling, Burkhead, Fairchild & Nichter in Lawrence, also serving as mediator for about 300 domestic and civil cases. He is an adjunct professor of law at Kansas University where he teaches alternative dispute resolution. He earned his undergraduate degree in economics at Texas Tech University and studied law at KU.
STUDENT WRITERS BLEND WORD GROUPS INTO POEMS
October 22, 1998
These poem sketches were inspired by word groups that the students incorporated into their poems. They were written by students in Joy Clumsky’s creative writing class at Lawrence High School. Field Dreams
S BASKETBALL PRACTICES ARE NOT EASY, THAT IS FOR SURE.
October 22, 1998
Players sometimes run until they drop at the conclusion of Kansas University’s rugged men’s basketball practices. Trash cans are never far away for Jayhawks who just might fall ill during post-practice sprints.
OUT
October 22, 1998
What: Lawrence ArtWalk ‘98, self-guided tour of artists’ studios and galleries. When: From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.
ANNUAL FIJI RUN SCHEDULED NEXT WEEK
October 22, 1998
For the past 25 years, members of Kansas University and Kansas State University’s Phi Gamma Delta (Fiji) fraternities have honored a former fraternity brother by joining together in a leukemia benefit. On Friday, Oct. 30, the two Fiji chapters will again raise money, running the football for the KU-K-State game from Bramlage Coliseum in Manhattan to Memorial Stadium in Lawrence. The 70-mile route will go along U.S. Highway 24 through Riley, Pottawatomie, Shawnee and Douglas counties.
KU TO HONOR CBS NEWSMAN
October 22, 1998
During a special ceremony today, John Frazee, vice president of news services for CBS News, will receive the Radio-TV-Journalism Alumni Honor Citation from Kansas University’s William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communications. The award will be presented during a broadcast writing and production class at 2:30 p.m. today in Room 2092, Dole Center for Human Development.
(NO HEADLINE)
October 22, 1998
“Al was kind of a character. He was always upbeat when I talked to him. From time to time I’d ask him about his teams of the past and get some history about the kids he coached. When he’d pass on the information, he’d always pass on an interesting story about his teams. “Between Al and Nanny Duver (longtime LHS assistant under Freeman who died in mid 1980s), I learned a lot about the history of Lawrence High. I’d go to Lawrence and watch Al’s teams play in several games. They always were well-prepared. He is a legend. There will never be another Al Woolard.”
LEGISLATIVE PAY
October 22, 1998
Fresh from a November election, Kansas legislators plan to tackle a proposal to substantially raise their salaries early next year. Proposed pay raises may look pretty good to state lawmakers, but they probably will be a hard sell to Kansas taxpayers.
RESIDENTS AND MANAGEMENT OF CLINTON PLACE APARTMENTS TALK ABOUT ACCESS, SAFETY AND COOPERATION.
October 22, 1998
Access and safety were on the minds of Clinton Place apartments residents Wednesday as they aired concerns about life at the privately owned, federally funded housing project for the elderly and disabled. And while some who listened to their complaints said they would get back to residents with answers, residents themselves weren’t so hopeful.
T EXPECT ANY PROBLEMS AT THE SHOW.
October 22, 1998
Much to the delight of his fans in the area, shock-rocker Marilyn Manson on Sunday will kick off the tour for his new album at a downtown Lawrence club. The hastily arranged show sold out 12 minutes after 650 tickets went on sale Wednesday evening.
PINCKNEY STUDENTS LEARNING TO LISTEN
October 22, 1998
Students will rate their own performance and will also be evaluated by teachers.
(NO HEADLINE)
October 22, 1998
ROBERT JAMES “MAC” MCKINNEY Tucson, Ariz. — Services for Robert James “Mac” McKinney, 79, Tucson, Ariz., will be held at 1 p.m. Friday at First Brethren Church. Cremation will be held.
MERCANTILE REPORTS HIGHER EARNINGS
October 22, 1998
Mercantile Bancorporation Inc. reported higher third-quarter earnings, which it said reflected growth in revenues from fee-based businesses and improved efficiency. The St. Louis-based bank holding company said Wednesday that net income was $110.5 million, or 71 cents per share, during the three months ended Sept. 30. That was up 4.4 percent from last year’s net income of $103.3 million, or 68 cents per share. The figures exclude non-recurring items in both periods.
BATS AND CATS RETURN FOR HALLOWEEN SHOW
October 22, 1998
Little ghouls and goblins can watch the adventures of Belfry and Lucy again this Halloween. The bat and the cat return in the Seem-To-Be Players’ production of “Cats and Bats II,” the sequel to last year’s “Cats and Bats” Halloween play by Ric Averill.
DEGREE OF TRAGEDY
October 22, 1998
To the editor: When is a life more precious and a murder more tragic? Events of the last week would seem to indicate that if the victim was a homosexual this is indeed the case. The outrage following the murder of a homosexual man in Wyoming spread across the country and even drew the wrath of the great leader in Washington as he demanded more new laws.
DANCERS FIND RHYTHMS IN ORDINARY THINGS
October 22, 1998
Which performance group uses 20 brooms, 30 pounds of sand, 10 garbage can lids and 40 gallons of water each week? “STOMP,” of course.
BAKER BLANKS GRACELAND, 2-0
October 22, 1998
Goalkeeper Sean Brown posted his ninth shutout of the season as Baker blanked Graceland, 2-0, in Heart of America Conference men’s soccer on Wednesday. Rayburn Moore and Mike McCabe scored for Baker (11-2-2) and Peter Lenz was credited with an assist.
KU CONTINUING INVESTIGATION INTO ALLEGED HAZING INCIDENT
October 22, 1998
The investigation into hazing allegations at a Kansas University fraternity continued on Wednesday, and those who questioned students involved said no decision would be made before next week. Phi Kappa Theta, 1941 Stewart, was placed on interim suspension last week after a freshman resident of the fraternity reported to KU officials that he had been hazed by house members.
CARTOON CRITICIZED
October 22, 1998
To the editor: As a Christian, I feel I must protest your use of Mike Luckovich’s “Comic Relief” cartoon in Sunday’s Journal-World.
SOCIAL SERVICE AGENCIES TO RECEIVE BENEFITS FROM LMH RENOVATION
October 22, 1998
Lawrence Memorial Hospital officials are unloading hundreds of chairs, televisions and other fixtures following recent renovations.
S HEARING POSTPONED
October 22, 1998
A judge postponed a preliminary hearing Wednesday for a former Baldwin city clerk accused of misusing city funds. Penni Porter, 40, faces two felony counts of misuse of public funds and three felony counts of making a false writing.
HAROLD F. TAYLOR
October 22, 1998
Services for Harold F. Taylor, 53, Lawrence, will be held at 3 p.m. Friday at Warren-McElwain Mortuary. Cremation will be held and private inurnment will be at Highland Cemetery, Ottawa. Mr. Taylor died Wednesday, Oct. 21, 1998, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
S DOLE INSTITUTE RECEIVES $6 MILLION
October 22, 1998
In a $520 billion spending bill approved Wednesday, Congress included $6 million for KU’s Dole Institute.
LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORT
October 22, 1998
Burglaries and thefts reported * Golf clubs and a golf bag valued at $1,300 were reported stolen between noon and 3 p.m. Oct. 16 from the 1600 block of Crossgate.
EMIL HABERER
October 22, 1998
Services for Emil Haberer, 92, Russell, will be held at 2 p.m. Friday at Pohlman’s Memorial Chapel. Burial will be in Russell City Cemetery. Mr. Haberer died Tuesday, Oct. 20, 1998, at Russell Regional Hospital.
A NAME IS A NAME IS A NAME BAGEL SHOP RETURNING TO ROOTS
October 22, 1998
Owners of the Bagel & Bagel chain hope the name change is a step to future growth and recognition by customers.
S PARTNER PROGRAM PROGRESSES
October 22, 1998
The Lawrence Business/ Education Partnership Board gives school officials an update on the program.
(NO HEADLINE)
October 22, 1998
Why are people allowed to walk their dogs in downtown Lawrence and allow their dogs to go to the bathroom in the middle of the sidewalk? They’re not allowed to let their dogs soil the sidewalk, City Manager Mike Wildgen said.
(NO HEADLINE)
October 22, 1998
For those of us who work and miss Oprah’s show, where can we obtain a list of books chosen for her book club? The quickest access to Oprah Winfrey’s literary list is through her Web site at www.oprah.com or AOL keyword: Oprah.
(NO HEADLINE)
October 22, 1998
Will the new “flex” bus system take non-handicapped and non-elderly passengers? If so, how much will it cost to ride? The envisioned transit system — establishing fixed routes that would be able to deviate to pick up qualifying elderly or disabled riders — has not yet been established.
MENTAL HEALTH COMMUNITY TO HONOR ITS CONTRIBUTORS
October 22, 1998
The 13th annual Pioneer Celebration, which honors people who have made significant contributions to mental health, will be held from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday at the Lawrence Holidome, 200 McDonald Dr. The event will feature a large exhibit of the accomplishments of Dr. Bert Nash and the history of the Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center.
EARTH NOT AN ENDLESS EDEN
October 22, 1998
Today the Earth is 6,002 years old. We learn this from Archbishop James Ussher, who, in the 1650s, used biblical chronology to calculate that the Earth was created on the evening preceding Oct. 23, 4004 BC. People who abide by Ussher’s research should no doubt be celebrating this anniversary of the Earth. For the next five days, they should also be venerating the creation of the Earth’s water and sky, sun and moon, and, of course, its fantastic richness of plants, animals and microbes. It is certainly cause for reverence that this life is everywhere on Earth — in seas, rivers, lakes and wetlands; in forests, grasslands, deserts and tundras; on coral reefs and ocean floors; in the deepest cracks in the earth; and in the cold Antarctic ice. If God “saw that it was good,” He must also have seen that it was plentiful: The life of the planet is a genesis that was some 50 million species strong. Humans are one of those species.