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Archive for Sunday, October 11, 1998

IN A RECENT LETTER TO THE EDITOR, A BICYCLIST STATED IT WAS LEGAL FOR BICYCLISTS TO RIDE TWO ABREAST. I WAS TOLD BY A POLICE OFFICER THAT THE OPPOSITE WAS TRUE. CAN YOU PLEASE CLARIFY THAT?

October 11, 1998

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Bicyclists must abide by the same traffic laws as drivers of motorized vehicles, but there are some specific exceptions.

Section 131 (c.) of the Standard Traffic Ordinance for Kansas Cities applies in this case. The ordinance states that ``Persons riding bicycles upon a roadway shall not ride more than two abreast except on paths or parts of roadways set aside for the exclusive use of bicycles.''

According the Journal-World, Kansas law states that bicyclists shall ride as near to the right side of the roadway as practical. What is the responsibility of automobile drivers who come up behind a bicyclist riding in the lane: Do they have to share the lane, move over to the left or drive behind the bicyclist?

Automobile drivers must treat motorcycles, mopeds and bicycles as they would a car or truck.

It is the responsibility of the automobile driver who comes upon a slower-moving bicyclist to safely pass the bicyclist in the same manner as he would pass another automobile.

What is the official ruling on school buses when the flashing yellow lights are on: Can you go on by or do you have to stop?

The yellow caution lights on school buses warn drivers that the bus is preparing to slow or stop. Drivers may pass school buses that display yellow caution lights.

However, drivers cannot legally pass a school bus that displays flashing red lights or has its stop signal arm extended.

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