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Archive for Tuesday, November 24, 1998

HASHING OVER LEFTOVERS

November 24, 1998

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One of the rituals I relied on throughout the holidays of my youth always came at the end of the meal. As we looked upon the riddled carcass of our half-eaten turkey, my stepfather invariably sighed and said, "Looks like we're going to be eating a lot of turkey hash."

For years I did not question this pronouncement, which conferred the same sense of certainty and finality as the "amen" at the end of a prayer. I'm not sure how old I was -- maybe even in college -- before it occurred to me that not once in my entire life had I eaten hash made from the leftovers of a holiday turkey.

I assume that this hash proclamation was the echo of something my stepfather had heard in his own childhood. Turkey hash may indeed have been the traditional sequel to the holiday dinner he grew up with.

I was reminded of this as I was looking forward to this holiday season and anticipating the leftovers. My family loves sandwiches and we usually dispose of the remaining turkey that way. Occasionally, we have made turkey noodle soup or turkey a la king.

As I researched some different ways to use a leftover turkey, I was a bit pleased to find that turkey hash is not the anachronism I had assumed it to be. The authors of several recent cookbooks give prominent play to recipes for this dish.

The best one I found came from Julee Rosso's "Great Good Food," and makes use of other leftovers likely to be on hand in the days following Thanksgiving or Christmas.

This hash is best made in a cast-iron skillet. In an oven-proof skillet, the hash also could be moved from stovetop to oven for the covered stage of cooking. If it were to finish cooking in the oven, I'd suggest preheating to Like other hashes, this one can be served at any meal. For a weekend breakfast or brunch, it can be served with a poached or fried egg. And also like other hashes, as long as the skillet contains meat and potatoes, the ingredients are flexible and subject to the whims of the cook.

Turkey Hash

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

1 large potato, scrubbed and cubed

1 green bell pepper, seeded and cut into find that turkey hash is not the anachronism I had assumed it to be. The authors of several recent cookbooks give prominent play to recipes for this dish.

The best one I found came from Julee Rosso's "Great Good Food," and makes use of other leftovers likely to be on hand in the days following Thanksgiving or Christmas.

This hash is best made in a cast-iron skillet. In an oven-proof skillet, the hash also could be moved from stovetop to oven for the covered stage of cooking. If it were to finish cooking in the oven, I'd suggest preheating to Like other hashes, this one can be served at any meal. For a weekend breakfast or brunch, it can be serv Her phone number is (785) 594-4554.

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