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Archive for Sunday, June 28, 1998

All stories

S MORE EXCITING
June 28, 1998
We like cop-court-lawyer TV shows at our house. I’m inclined to think that we learn about as much about the justice system as we do on C-Span, except for the stuff about Kenneth Starr and that federal judge who seems to be in Starr’s pocket. (We’re learning here, too.) If this be treason make the most of it. The best of the shows, and it has been best for several years, is “Law and Order.” My only complaint about that show is that the cast members change too often. The only person there since the beginning is that district attorney who’s always so cautious and so critical of his aides. One of the best things about “Law and Order” is that it sometimes ends badly. By “badly” I mean that someone who is patently guilty gets off. I used to tell my classes, in talking about the free press/fair trial issue, that justice would mean that if someone guilty of a heinous crime was freed that he’d walk out of the courthouse and be struck by lightning. (Is this point of view too conservative?)
YELLOW NUTSEDGE: THIS GRASSLIKE WEED IS PRETTY TOUGH TO CRACK
June 28, 1998
Yellow nutsedge has been rearing its ugly head lately. This weed looks like a grass and is sometimes incorrectly called nutgrass. Unlike grasses, however, nutsedge has triangular stems and three-ranked leaves, meaning the leaves come off the stem in three directions. Yellow nutsedge is pale green to yellow in color. It grows rapidly in the spring and early summer, and because of this rapid shoot growth, it sticks up above the rest of the lawn only a few days after mowing. This weed is a good indicator of poor drainage, but it can be introduced into well-drained sites through contaminated topsoil or nursery stock.
PARENTS AGAIN RALLY AROUND GRANT SCHOOL
June 28, 1998
Grant School parents are not wavering in the fight to keep the school open.
FAMILY FARMS FADING, BUT NOT YET GONE
June 28, 1998
The Pendleton family works together on all aspects of their farm.
THOSE WHO HAVE PERUSED THE DEFINITIVE BOOK ON THE PAST 143 YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL LIFE IN LAWRENCE SAY THE BOOK IS A WELCOME AND ENJOYABLE HISTORY LESSON.
June 28, 1998
A rush of joy as someone sees a familiar 18-year-old face in a crowd gathered in 1972 outside Lawrence High School. A twinge of embarrassment accompanied by giddy laughter as someone else sees a particularly silly grin forever immortalized in the “Grease”-like fashions of the 1950s.
RADIO OPERATORS LOG CONTACT POINTS
June 28, 1998
Ham radio enthusiasts worked the airwaves throughout the night, and will continue to reach out across America today.
COOKING UP TROUBLE
June 28, 1998
New laws cracking down on methamphetamine in Missouri may send clandestine labs to Kansas, where laws are not as strict.
HISTORIC HOUSE TO HAVE HOME
June 28, 1998
Preservationists went to work with crowbars and sledgehammers Saturday. A dozen volunteers ripped, hammered and yanked apart a wooden addition to the Murphy-Bromelsick house at 909 Pa.
JAYHAWKS MIGHT LOSE ROBERSON
June 28, 1998
Kansas University’s football team might lose a scholarship quarterback, but it will pick up a walk-on. Akili Roberson, KU’s No. 2 quarterback at the conclusion of spring drills, has not achieved eligibility for the fall semester, Kansas coach Terry Allen said. Roberson’s ineligibility apparently stems from academic problems, and Allen said Roberson was enrolled in summer school.
DISMISSALS:
June 28, 1998
Kristi Utchell and infant son, Lawrence, Saturday. Births:
RED-LIGHT RUNNERS MAY GET SURPRISE CITATION IN MAIL
June 28, 1998
City officials are looking into the possibility of buying cameras to keep an eye on drivers who run red lights.
STRENGTH IN DIVERSITY
June 28, 1998
An eclectic mix of restaurants, locally owned shops and national retailers keep the pulse of downtown Lawrence strong.
S REINDEER DONNER OR DONDER?
June 28, 1998
It’s Donder, according to Clement C. Moore’s 1823 poem, “A Visit From St. Nicholas.” Moore introduced the idea that Santa had eight named reindeer pulling his sleigh. In addition to Donder, there were Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid and Blitzen.
PEACE CORPS TO HOLD WORKSHOP
June 28, 1998
The Peace Corps will be sponsoring an “International Education Opportunities Workshop” from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. July 1 at Wichita State University. Educators who served as volunteers in Latin America, Eastern Europe and Africa will be on hand. For information or to make a reservation, call 800-424-8580, then press 1.
MAYER COLUMN
June 28, 1998
Realtors always dwell on the merits of “location, location, location.” Living war heroes often insist they happened to be “in the right place at the right time” along with being tremendously lucky. That’s how a lot of pro basketball players find it after they are drafted, a la Kansas’ Raef LaFrentz (Denver) and Paul Pierce (Boston). It helps to wind up with a club that needs your particular skills and which can allow you some time to develop. Superstar Michael Jordan, for all his potential, didn’t have his chances for immortality weakened by the other personnel of the Chicago Bulls. Raef and Paul may also have fallen into good mixes.
CHECK IT OUT
June 28, 1998
For more information about red-light cameras and other developing technology for automated traffic-enforcement systems, check out American Traffic Systems Inc.’s site on the World Wide Web. Point your web browser to http://www.traffic.com.
KEY SCHOOL DECISIONS
June 28, 1998
an important bond issue and the hiring of a new school superintendent — will have a huge impact on the future of the Lawrence school district. The Lawrence school board is facing two decisions that will have a long-term impact on local schools.
TWO TOTS FOR THE AREA HAVE AWARD-WINNING SMILES.
June 28, 1998
Evan Thorton, 3, of Lawrence, and Jaren Sharp, almost 2, of Tonganoxie, were given honorable mention in the McKenna Professional Imagining photography lab Tiny Tots contest. Herb’s Studio, where the children were photographed, has competed in the contest for five years.
MARIE ELIZABETH TRAXLER
June 28, 1998
Services for Marie Elizabeth Traxler, 76, Lecompton, will be held at 10 a.m. Monday at Maple Grove Cemetery, Lecompton. Mrs. Traxler died Thursday, June 25, 1998, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORT POLICE REPORTS
June 28, 1998
* Jimmy Lee Johnson Jr., 17, Lawrence, was arrested for aggravated assault and battery Saturday afternoon, according to Douglas County Jail records. Johnson was released to the custody of a police officer 15 minutes after being booked into the jail, according to records. Details about the arrest were not available Saturday night. Condition reports
PLACES AND FACES
June 28, 1998
Anne Garlinghouse Professional Mediation Services has moved to 1012 Mass. St., Suite 208. Specializing in mediation since 1994, Garlinghouse is Kansas Supreme Court-approved in core, civil, domestic and parent/adolescent mediation. *
MCLOUTH TO HOLD FIREWORKS DISPLAY
June 28, 1998
McLouth - A fireworks display will be held at dark, about 9:45 p.m., July 4 in McLouth. It will be west of the high school football field, behind the new baseball fields. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. Do not bring personal fireworks to shoot. The event is sponsored by McLouth Recreation Commission, City of McLouth, McLouth Kiwanis Club and the McLouth Fire Department.
FIX.
June 28, 1998
Some people have all the luck. Their gardens grow in rich loamy soil with terrific drainage on a nice level site. The flower beds are perfectly situated to capture the glory of the morning sun and are protected from the scorching heat of the afternoon sun by pleasant dappled shade. Yes, some people have all the luck. Then, there’s the Heffners. Mike and Donna Heffner have none of these idyllic characteristics in their garden. The two of them battle a steep slope, deep shade and too much or too little drainage in the back garden. Their front flower beds bake in the constant exposure of southern sun. To top it off, a tree house in the backyard invites their youngest son, neighborhood boys and a few dogs to traipse through their garden in search of high adventure. Despite these obstacles, they have managed to create a beautiful garden spot in their west Lawrence home.
STELLA NEWMAN
June 28, 1998
Services for Stella May Copp Newman, 96, will be at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at the Davidson Funeral Home, Topeka. Burial will be in Memorial Park Cemetery, Topeka. Mrs. Newman died Friday, June 26, 1998, at a Topeka nursing home.
FEDERAL GRANT WILL PUT KANSAS SCHOOLS TO WORK
June 28, 1998
U.S. Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley and U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexis Herman have awarded Kansas a $2.8 million grant to implement School-to-Work projects across the state. The award culminates four years of planning by state officials. “School-to-Work in Kansas encourages students to meet high academic standards while exposing them to the exciting learning opportunities offered through high technology,” Riley said. “I believe that efforts like these will go a long way toward instilling in young people the importance of working hard to succeed in acquiring skills in challenging academic and technical courses.”
AZINGER TO GET FORMAL SEND-OFF AT SCHOOL BOARD MEETING
June 28, 1998
Supt. Al Azinger will get a final farewell at the Lawrence school board meeting Monday. Azinger, who will leave the district at the end of July, will be honored at a recognition ceremony at the beginning of the meeting, which begins at 7 p.m. at the district service center, 3705 Clinton Pkwy.
T MEET TUESDAY NIGHT
June 28, 1998
Lawrence city commissioners are taking a premeditated break. Instead of gathering for their usual Tuesday night business meeting, commissioners will have the night off to do as they please. Commissioners typically only meet for four business meetings each month; they’ve already met four times.
CAMERAS IN COLORADO CATCHING DRIVERS
June 28, 1998
Although no formal studies have been conducted, observers report a reduction in accidents and people running red lights.
CORRECTION
June 28, 1998
A story in Saturday’s Journal-World incorrectly stated that the Douglas County Household Hazardous Collection Facility would be open on Saturday morning. The hazardous waste center is open only on the third Saturday of each month, through October. The center will be open from 8 a.m. to noon on July 18, Aug. 15, Sept. 19 and Oct. 17 at the county’s public works yard, 711 E. 23rd.
FESTIVAL PLAYS UP LECOMPTON HERITAGE
June 28, 1998
Visitors to Lecompton Territorial Capital Festival got a touch of history and a touch of fun Saturday.
UTILITIES GEAR UP FOR HEAT
June 28, 1998
Kansans are firing up their air conditioners as the heat continues; power plants are keeping up with demand.
CLARENCE R. WALES
June 28, 1998
Services for Clarence R. Wales, 69, Lawrence, will be at 10 a.m. Monday at Underwood Cemetery. Mr. Wales died Thursday, June 25, 1998, at Stormont-Vail Regional Medical Center, Topeka.
JUDGES SEEK FELINE PURR-FECTION
June 28, 1998
Cat lovers are gathering this weekend at the Douglas County 4-H Fairgrounds to show off their favorite animals.
BIG BROTHERS AGENCY SEEKS PUBLIC SUPPORT
June 28, 1998
Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Douglas County is asking members of the community for help in its pursuit of funding. The organization is requesting funds from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, to be used to extend and support the Partnership With Youth Program. The program serves juvenile offenders and their siblings by matching them with volunteer mentors who spend three to four hours each week with them.
S THE PROCESS FOR BECOMING A PRIVATE COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY APPRAISER?
June 28, 1998
You can’t become an appraiser overnight. You need both appraising education and experience, said an official with the Kansas Real Estate Appraisal Board, which regulates appraisers in the state. The board issues several different types of licenses. Depending on the type of license, it can be a lengthy process, the official said. The state has a list of approved appraisal courses. Specific information is available by calling (785) 296-0706.
WHEN ARE DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSIONERS GOING TO TALK ABOUT THE PROPOSED CHANGES IN FIVE-ACRE EXEMPTIONS? WILL THE PUBLIC GET A CHANCE TO COMMENT?
June 28, 1998
Douglas County commissioners and the Lawrence-Douglas County Metropolitan Planning Commission will discuss amendments to the county’s subdivision regulations during a study session from 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. July 8 in the city commission meeting room at city hall, Sixth and Massachusetts streets. It is a public meeting. Is the correct name of Santa’s reindeer Donner or Donder?
IN 1898
June 28, 1998
On June 28, 1898, F.W. Blackmar, professor of history and sociology, wrote the Lawrence Journal an extensive article on “Economic Advantages of Good Roads.” Blackmar noted “There are 5,779 work horses in Douglas County. These horses, I will say, sell at an average of $40, giving a total value of $231,160. It is supposed if they sell for that it costs about that much to rear a horse to working age and the expense of keeping a horse each year cannot be less than $40. With good roads we might use 3 horses where now we use 4 and the expense would be reduced to the number of 3,852 horses, valued at $154,090. That is not all. With better roads horses would last from 1 to 3 years longer. — Courtesy Watkins Community Museum
THE WORKHOUSE GIRL JESSICA STIRLING
June 28, 1998
The handsome, brilliant minister Robert Montague returns to Victorian Scotland to set up his ministry. A beautiful young girl named Cassie Amittage yearns to escape the boredom of her upper-class life. In spite of the interference of her envious little sister, Pippa, Cassie and Robert announce their engagement and marry. Sound like the end of a romance novel? Actually, it’s just the beginning of “The Workhouse Girl” (St. Martin’s Press, $25.95), the latest novel from Jessica Stirling.