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Archive for Wednesday, July 1, 1998

S TIME FOR SOMETHING COOL INSIDE.

July 1, 1998

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It was a hot, drippy summer day.

Outside, the heat was rising: 94 ... 95 ... 96 ...

Inside Sylas and Maddy's, parents tilted their head back to read the flavors listed on the blackboard. Children stood on tiptoes, pressing their faces against the glass case to see the ice cream.

``We had a line out the door for three hours last night,'' one of the owners of Sylas and Maddy's, Cindy England, said Thursday.

Alec Enslinger, 5, was having his birthday party at the ice cream parlor Monday. Thirteen 4-, 5- and 6-year-olds ate Mint Cookie, Da Bomb and even old fashion vanilla ice cream.

Alec said he liked vanilla best, ``because it tastes like cake.''

``I always get vanilla, but sometimes I get all different flavors,'' he said.

During the heat of July, Americans celebrate National Ice Cream month. While ice cream companies offer the perfect sundae recipe, many fans have their own ideas about how to eat the icy concoction.

Malinda Grier and a friend made their afternoon trip from the courthouse to Sylas and Maddy's, 1014 Mass., for ice cream.

``I like mine in a cone,'' she said, though she added that she doesn't have a favorite flavor.

``We have some people that come in every day,'' England said. The parlor makes all its own ice cream and even its own waffle cones. It has a variety of more than 100 flavors, though only 40 are available at one time.

``We get yelled and screamed at and people throw temper tantrums when their favorites are not out,'' she said. ``If we have it, we'll scoop it.''

Sylas and Maddy's offers several ice creams generated from customer suggestion. A running contest every month chooses one customer-created flavor to serve. Some of the best-selling ice creams it sells, including Gold Rush and Monkey Mash, came from the contest.

According to the International Ice Cream Assn., the United States produces 23.2 quarts of ice cream annually per capita.

This week a few quarts were consumed by Maggie Riggs' class of high school students on the Kansas University campus for Duke University's Talent Identification Program, an intense, three-week course on ethics in science.

``You can only think about so many heavy questions before it's time for ice cream,'' Riggs said.

Davene Wright, 14, from Atlanta was eating a Mint Cookie cone. Her favorite, she said, was mint chocolate chip. She likes it best after 15 seconds in the microwave, just to soften it up.

Tiffany Meites, 13, from Oklahoma City agreed. She wants her ice cream soft, too, ``not rock hard, but not soupy.''

``If it's chocolately, I like it,'' she said.

Chris Perry, 16, Linwood, came in with a few friends Monday. He was having a bowlful of Da Bomb, another house specialty. It is his favorite, he said, and he eats it without a cone.

``Out of the bowl works good,'' he said. The best way to eat it, he said, would be with toppings.

``M&M's and everything,'' he said. ``Everything but nuts.''

For the adventurous, the parlor offers the

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Continued from page 1D

sampler cone. Using a melon baller, staff puts five small scoops of different flavors on one cone. Some customers want even more unusual combinations. One asked for Banana Cream Pie ice cream with gummy bears on top.

Chris Bagwell, 16, from Broken Arrow, Ariz., summed it up.

``Ice cream is good.''

This delectable ice cream treat is made by a gracious cook in Baldwin, who agreed to share her recipe.

Fried Ice Cream

1 cup sugar

1 tablespoon cinnamon

6 tortilla shells

Vanilla ice cream

1 cup cornflakes, crushed

.''

``If it's chocolately, I like it,'' she said.

Chris Perry, 16, Linwood, came in with a few friends Monday. He was having a bowlful of Da Bomb, another house specialty. It is his favorite, he said, and he eatsd sugar mixture. Set aside.

Scoop ice cream balls. Place in freezer to prevent melting. Mix cornflake For the adventurous, the parlor offers the

See Things, page 3D

Continued from page 1D

sampler cone. Using a melon baller, staff puts five small scoops of different flavors on one cone. Some customers want even more unusual combinations. One asked for Banana Cream Pie ice cream with gummy bears on top.

Chris Bagwell, 16, from Broken Arrow, Ariz., summed it up.

``Ice cream is good.''

This delectable ice cream treat is made by a gracious cook in Baldwin, who agreed to share her recipe.

Fried Ice Cream

1 cup sugar

1 tablespoon cinnamon

6 tortilla shells

Vanilla ice cream

1 cup cornflakes, crushed

.''

``If it's chocolately, I like it,'' she said.

Chris Perry, 16, Linwood, came in with a few friends Monday. He was having a bowlful of Da Bomb, another house specialty. It is his favorite, he said, and he eatsm into pie crust. Freeze at least 2 hours or overnight. Garnish with topping, whipped cream, remaining pretzel crumbs and cherries. Makes six to eight servings.

-- Recipe from the International Ice Cream Assn.

-- Felicia Haynes' phone message number is 832-7173. Her e-mail address is fhaynes@ljworld.com.

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