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Archive for Wednesday, December 30, 1998

CANINE CUISINE IS CATCHING ON IN MID-AMERICA

December 30, 1998

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Some dogs are fed like privileged members of the family.

Pets are people, too.

At least they can eat like it, if their owner shops at a haute pet establishment such as Bone Appetit Bakery or has the new "Three Dog Bakery Cookbook."

More and more dogs are moving beyond "the family pet" and are gaining status as a member of the family. According to a study done for PETsMART, pet owners spend an average of $54 per family on their pets during the holidays. Eighty-three percent of pet owners give their pets gifts. In Lawrence, there is a bakery dedicated to nothing but delicacies for pets. There are cookbooks, such as the Three Dog Bakery's, with recipes for treats for a favorite pooch.

Pampering a pooch

Heather Galbraith, a manager at Pet World in Lawrence, freely admits her dog, Otto, is spoiled. The boxer gets treats -- lots of 'em.

"He's just spoiled," she said. "I try to keep them along the line of things that aren't harmful,"

The 4-year-old canine, which Galbraith's mother calls her "granddog," gets a wide range of treats from the pet store.

"I have access to all kinds of treats," she said. "He gets a variety of that stuff. ... He likes the body part chew toys. He gets bread every once in a while, because that's OK. And he gets cheese every once in a while, because he really loves it."

She doesn't bake for him -- at least not yet.

"Just for Christmas, from a friend of mine, I got a recipe" for dog biscuits, she said.

It came with a bone-shaped cookie cutter.

"I haven't tried it yet, but I'm going to," she said.

She isn't the only one who treats her dog like family. Many of the store's customers pamper their pets, too.

"So many people come in and get the little chew toys," she said. "Especially around Christmas time. Our main sales are people just buying little presents for their dogs and cats and their friends' dogs and cats. People spend a lot of money on that stuff."

Special dogs, special treats

If you think your pet may be tired of traditional dog biscuits, you can try Lawrence's Bone Appetit Bakery, 125 E. 10th. Rover can even go shopping with you. At least 50 dogs have already visited the bakery, which has been open about a month and a half.

"Some of them are repeat customers," owner Doug D'Albini said. "The owners will hold things for them to sniff, get their opinions on it."

There are Russell Rover Bon Bons and Bite My Hand treats. Many of the delicacies are baked on the premises. The treats are made using whole wheat flour, wheat germ, corn meal, eggs, canola oil, garlic, peanut butter, carob, beef or chicken flavored yeast, parsley, oregano and Parmesan cheese.

D'Albini said he has tried some of the treats.

"I've tried the Bark-B-Q ribs," he said. "They're not too bad. ... They're crunchy."

The bon bons, he said, taste a bit different.

"We use unsweetened carob, so it's not the chocolate taste I'm used to," he said.

Customers spend a bit to pamper their pets.

"We've had some people who've come in and spent $40 on their own dog," he said. "People seem to treat them more human than they used to, I guess."

Fido fixings

Dog-loving cooks can spoil their pet at home, too. The "Three Dog Bakery Cookbook," by Dan Dye and Mark Beckloff, is filled with recipes you may want to try -- for your dog or yourself. The cookbook from the upscale canine bakery on Kansas City's Country Club Plaza has recipes for dishes like

See Canine, page 2D

Continued from page 1D

Grrrrrrranola and Chicken Cat-Chiatore. Here are recipes in "Three Dog Bakery Cookbook," by Dan Dye and Mark Beckloff (Andrews McMeel Publishing, $12.95).

Cheese Please Hound Rounds

2 cups white flour

cheese.

D'Albini said he has tried some of the treats.

"I've tried the Bark-B-Q ribs," he said. "They're not too bad. ... They're crunchy."

The bon bons, he said, taste a bit difs

ent.

"We use unsweetened carob, so it's not the chocolate taste I'm used to," he said.

Customers spend a bit to pamper their pets.

"We've had some people who've come in and spent $40 on their own dog," he said. "People seem to treat them more human than they used to, I guess."

Fido fixings

Dog-loving cooks can spoil their pet at home, too. The "Three Dog Bakery Cookbook," by Dan Dye and Mark Beckloff, is filled with recipes you may want to try -- for your dog or yourself. The cookbook from the upscale canine bakery on Kansas City's Country Club Plaza has recipes for dishes like

See Canine, page 2D

Continued from page 1D

Grrrrrrranola and Chicken Cat-Chiatore. Here are recipes in "Three Dog Bakery Cookbook," by Dan Dye and Mark Beckloff (Andrews McMeel Publishing, $12.95).

Cheese Please Hound Rounds

2 cups white flour

cheese.

D'Albini said he has tried some of the treats.

"I've tried the Bark-B-Q ribs," he said. "They're not too bad. ... They're crunchy."

The bon bons, he said, taste a bit difhoney

"We use unsweetened carob, so it's not the chocolate taste I'm used to," he said.

Customers spend a bit to pamper their pets.

"We've had some people who've come in and spent $40 on their own dog," he said. "People seem to treat them more human than they used to, I guess."

Fido fixings

Dog-loving cooks can spoil their pet at home, too. The "Three Dog Bakery Cookbook," by Dan Dye and Mark Beckloff, is filled with recipes you may want to try -- for your dog or yourself. The cookbook from the upscale canine bakery on Kansas City's Country Club Plaza has recipes for dishes like

See Canine, page 2D

Continued from page 1D

Grrrrrrranola and Chicken Cat-Chiatore. Here are recipes in "Three Dog Bakery Cookbook," by Dan Dye and Mark Beckloff (Andrews McMeel Publishing, $12.95).

Cheese Please Hound Rounds

2 cups white flour

cheese.

D'Albini said he has tried some of the treats.

"I've tried the Bark-B-Q ribs," he said. "They're not too bad. ... They're crunchy."

The bon bons, he said, taste a bit difynes@ljworld.com.

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