Archive for Sunday, August 16, 1998

All stories

FILIPINO VETERANS ENTITLED TO MILITARY BENEFITS
August 16, 1998
Casiano Santos was among the lucky ones. On April 9, 1942, U.S. forces on the Bataan peninsula and their Filipino allies, including Santos, surrendered to Japanese forces, and the Death March began. Santos, a Filipino inducted into the U.S. Army 17 days after Pearl Harbor, escaped from the march on April 14. He joined guerrilla forces and fought with World War I-vintage Springfield rifles until suffering serious shrapnel wounds on March 27, 1945. Another Filipino guerrilla fighter — he was 16 when he picked up his gun — was Resty Supnet, who this morning is seated next to Santos, doing justice to a large American breakfast of pancakes and wondering, with Santos, why American justice has not been done to Filipinos whose fighting, according to Douglas MacArthur, saved America many dollars and lives.
I UNDERSTAND THAT PRO CHEER IS NO LONGER GOING TO COMPETE. ARE THERE ANY OTHER COMPETITIVE CHEERLEADING PROGRAMS IN THE LAWRENCE AREA?
August 16, 1998
According to the KU Spirit Office, Pro Cheer is still operating. There are other programs in the area, though. Dance City Dance Studios Inc. in Lawrence, at 843-3344, said it has a competitive program. The World Cheerleading Assn. in Kansas City said there is a program in Kansas City, Apex Cheerleading run by Wes Gedney at (913) 851-3922. A neighbor has only mowed once this year. His weeds, crabgrass, etc., are a problem. How do we get him to mow?
T HAPPEN TO PICK UP OUR PARTICULAR LOCAL CHANNELS IN WHAT THEY CHOOSE TO PRESENT TO THE NATIONAL PUBLIC?
August 16, 1998
“Currently, (satellite providers) are prohibited by law from inserting and/or rebroadcasting any local/off-air programming in any market throughout the U.S,” said Sunflower Cable General Manager Dan McGough. There is heavy lobbying and even some pending legislation to change this restriction, he said, which obviously is opposed by the cable television industry because it opens many issues such as retransmission/must carry, an uneven playing field for cable, franchise fees, and so on.
S THE LIMIT FOR AIDS PROJECT
August 16, 1998
Jenette Nagy leaned against the Cessna’s window, pointing out the sights of Lawrence to Jeff Gadt. “I was showing him all my favorite biking trails,” she said after their almost-20 minute plane ride Saturday.
OPAL M. HUFFMAN
August 16, 1998
Graveside services for Opal M. Huffman, 88, Pratt, will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Greenlawn Cemetery, Pratt. Mrs. Huffman died Saturday, Aug. 15, 1998, at a Hutchinson hospital.
HOSPITAL REPORT DISMISSALS
August 16, 1998
Janette Maxine Kroeger and baby boy, Lawrence. Births
GEORGE PEPPERCORN
August 16, 1998
A funeral Mass for George Edward Peppercorn, 89, Clinton, will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Holy Rosary Catholic Church in Clinton. Graveside services will be at 3 p.m. Tuesday at Memorial Park Cemetery, Lawrence, Kan. Mr. Peppercorn died Thursday, Aug. 13, 1998, at his home.
A PRIME PRODUCT
August 16, 1998
University officials and the Kansas Board of Regents are taking the right approach by banding together to sell the state on higher education. It’s great to see the leaders of the six state universities in Kansas working together on a strategy to promote their schools and sell the public on the need to upgrade faculty salaries.
COMMISSIONERS WILL REVIEW A CONTRACT BETWEEN THE JUVENILE JUSTICE AUTHORITY AND THE COUNTY FOR PAID ATTENDANT CARE FOR JUVENILE OFFENDERS.
August 16, 1998
The program, through The Shelter, allows for attendants to sit in the law enforcement center with children who have gone through juvenile intake and are waiting for a guardian or transportation. The Shelter is responsible for paying the attendants, and the state reimburses the agency through the county. The contract in reality is between The Shelter and JJA, but is arranged through the county, County Administrator Craig Weinaug said.
GEORGE PEPPERCORN
August 16, 1998
A funeral Mass for George Edward Peppercorn, 89, Clinton, will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Holy Rosary Catholic Church in Clinton. Graveside services will be at 3 p.m. Tuesday at Memorial Park Cemetery, Lawrence, Kan. Mr. Peppercorn died Thursday, Aug. 13, 1998, at his home.
DRAWING UP PLANS FOR A NEW $9.5 MILLION INDOOR AQUATIC CENTER WOULD COST THE CITY $579,832, UNDER AN AGREEMENT UP FOR APPROVAL TUESDAY NIGHT.
August 16, 1998
Lawrence city commissioners will consider entering into an agreement with Michael Treanor Architects to handle architectural and engineering services for the project, to be located on property owned by the Lawrence school district just northwest of Free State High School. They also will discuss the possibility of hiring a construction manager to oversee the project. Commissioners already have agreed upon the basic components for the construction project, including a competitive pool measuring 50 meters by 25 yards, with an adjustable bulkhead that could split it in two. Also called for: a bleacher area with 500 seats, locker rooms, a concessions area and a multipurpose “birthday room” that could be rented out for parties.
THE CONTRACT COVERS ONLY SERVICES TO JUVENILE OFFENDERS WHO ARE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF JJA.
August 16, 1998
Judy Culley, executive director of The Shelter, said the service was used frequently before completion of the county’s juvenile detention center. “We used this service a great deal, as we had children waiting for law enforcement to transport them to facilities out of town, etc.,” Culley said in a memo to Weinaug. “Now we do not use this service as frequently, but when we do, it is important that it is available.”
ACCIDENT HOSPITALIZES LAWRENCE DRIVER
August 16, 1998
A one-car accident put a Lawrence man in the hospital Saturday afternoon. Francis Biggers, 48, was injured when the 1986 Nissan pickup truck he was driving left the road, went through two fences and hit a telephone pole.
IN 1898
August 16, 1998
On Aug. 16, 1898, the Lawrence Journal editorialized: “There is reason to believe that the war is over, and there is still more reason for the belief that the Kansas troops have not been in it. If they ever do succeed in getting a sight of foreign lands, it will be because we need armies of occupation in the Philippines, Cuba and Puerto Rico. That we shall need many soldiers is scarcely probable, and the chances are 10 to 1 that the Kansas boys will return home without having seen anything more warlike than a gray back. For this grievous disappointment for this slight to the state, for this insult to eager and brave young soldiers, some one is to blame. Where shall that blame lie? Undoubtedly the actions of Governor Leedy were primarily responsible for the shabby treatment given to our boys.” — Courtesy Watkins Community Museum
YOUNG RACCOONS ARE READY TO VENTURE INTO YOUR WORLD
August 16, 1998
Of all small animals, raccoons are probably the most destructive. They are known to get into homes, destroy some crops in the garden, rummage in garbage cans and consume pet food left outside. Most young raccoons are born in April and May. At 8 to 10 weeks of age they are weaned — usually in August. Raccoons prefer wooded areas near streams, rivers or other water sources. They are omnivorous and eat a variety of food such as crayfish, snails, small mammals, insects, vegetables, some fruits and nuts, as well as grains. They will eat pet food, garbage or other foods they find in urban and suburban areas.
RESOURCEFULNESS HAS HELPED SHAPE A GARDEN OF DELIGHT.
August 16, 1998
It’s been said that necessity is the mother of invention. I suppose that’s why duct tape is so versatile. If you’ve got a problem and are ingenious enough, you can fix the problem. At least that’s how it plays out with gardening. Or as some folks say, “Sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do.” Mary and Jeff Weinberg began to garden in 1970, shortly after moving into their house in a pleasant neighborhood west of Kansas University. An old silver maple tree shades the miniature rhododendrons and the flower boxes that are filled with colorful impatiens in the neatly trimmed front yard. This simple garden in front gives no hint that a more colorful garden, hidden by a tall wooden fence, grows in the back yard. Fortunately, I had the chance to tour this wonderful garden spot late one afternoon.
S FIRST DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST, WHICH WAS SPONSORED BY LAWRENCE.COM AND CAMERA AMERICA.
August 16, 1998
And his digital image won the grand prize in the contest, an Olympus D-200 digital camera. Wysocki went June 21 to the Lawrence Aquatic Center, 727 Ky., and used a Polaroid camera to create an impressionistic image.
BAND TO HOST OPEN REHEARSAL
August 16, 1998
The 312th Army Reserve Band will be hosting an open rehearsal from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday at the Army Reserve Center, 2100 Iowa. Rehearsals are open to reservists between the ages of 17 and 35.
S TOP PRIORITY FOR NEW RECREATION PROJECTS.
August 16, 1998
The project originally was envisioned to include a 25-meter competitive pool, but commissioners bumped it up to 50 meters after hearing from leaders of organized swimming groups. The entire project is set to be financed using revenues from a 1-cent countywide sales tax approved by voters in 1994.
VOLLEYBALL
August 16, 1998
As a Lawrence High volleyball assistant for 16 years, Jo Huntsinger let head coach Joan Wells worry about details. “Last year I’d be at the lake until Sunday night, put up the volleyball nets and then we’d go,” Huntsinger said.
S FOSTER CARE SYSTEM.
August 16, 1998
About 18 months ago, the administration of Gov. Bill Graves launched a privatization initiative, unprecedented in the United States, that has dramatically changed the state’s child welfare system. Everyone closely involved with the reform has acknowledged potholes on the road to change. During the transition from a system directly managed by state welfare workers to one run by private contractors, many more children have become state wards than were expected. The private contractors, burdened with new responsibilities and burgeoning caseloads, have had trouble finding and keeping properly trained workers. And the Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services’ new computer system for tracking delivered children’s services still isn’t reliable enough to serve its intended purpose in the new system.
S 35-MINUTE FOOTBALL SCRIMMAGE.
August 16, 1998
Maybe there really is something to this talk about a new and improved Kansas University football offense. During a 35-minute, 36-play scrimmage Saturday at the KU practice fields, big offensive plays were plentiful and positive yards commonplace, and no one was less surprised than coach Terry Allen.
A NEIGHBOR HAS ONLY MOWED ONCE THIS YEAR. HIS WEEDS, CRABGRASS, ETC., ARE A PROBLEM. HOW DO WE GET HIM TO MOW?
August 16, 1998
Call the city’s weed inspector, at 832-3115 or 832-3100, to make a complaint, City Manager Mike Wildgen said. “The city’s weed inspector will inspect the property, if the grass/weeds are too high,” Wildgen said. “If the property is not mowed, the city will hire a mower to mow it and charge the property owner for the costs.”
VIDEO ON THE FLAG TO BE SHOWN THURSDAY
August 16, 1998
A music video on the American flag will be shown at 3:30 p.m. Thursday at Swarthout Recital Hall in Murphy Hall at Kansas University. The show, sponsored by the Kansas Army National Guard, is a historic flag music video, said Joy Moser, spokeswoman for the Guard.
CIVIL WAR PROGRAMS SET AT ELDRIDGE HOTEL
August 16, 1998
The Kansas Humanities Council has awarded Civil War on the Western Frontier a grant for $1,771 to support a series of historical programs Wednesday through Aug. 23. The following talks will be free and open to the public at the Eldridge Hotel: * “From Rose Ise to Lidie Netwon: Why Do So Many Writers Find Early Kansas So Fascinating?” at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, by professor Sara Tucker, Washburn University.
* CONSIDER APPROVAL OF BIDS FOR LANDSCAPING AT THE CITY-COUNTY HEALTH FACILITY, ROAD DE-ICING SALT AND AGGREGATES FOR ROADS.
August 16, 1998
* Consider approval to solicit proposals for auditing services. * Hold a public hearing about the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks renewing its lease of Clinton State Park from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
NED KEHDE COLUMN
August 16, 1998
Bea and Gabe Bonanno recently made their perennial pilgrimage, escaping the fleshpot of the New York City area, to the Midwest, where they visited grandparents, uncles, aunts and cousins. Normally their destination is Lawrence and nearby environs. Last summer, however, they ventured for the first time to the sparkling, cool lakes of the north woods of Minnesota, where their great-great grandfather Garstang spent his summers in quest of piscatorial pleasures and relief from the summer’s humidity and heat that plague the folks from Missouri and eastern Kansas. During that northern sojourn Bea and Gabe frolicked with nearly a dozen of their kin and spent days on end, as most of Garstang’s young children and grandchildren have done since the 1930s, swimming and catching scads of sunfish.
ARBA E. WILLIAMS
August 16, 1998
Services for Arba E. Williams, 75, Lawrence, are pending and will be announced by Rumsey-Yost Funeral Home. Mr. Williams died Sunday, Aug. 16, 1998, at his home.
DEFENDING CHAMPION CHRIS THOMPSON SHOT AN OPENING-ROUND 69 FOR A TWO-SHOT LEAD OVER DANE OGDEN AND CHARLIE SANTAULARIA IN THE CITY GOLF TOURNAMENT.
August 16, 1998
Kids these days. Two 20-somethings and a teen-ager are in contention to win the city golf championship after Saturday’s opening round at Alvamar.
DOUGLAS COUNTY GETS HIGH MARKS FOR APPRAISALS
August 16, 1998
A statewide appraisal study shows Douglas County’s values are right on target.
LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORT
August 16, 1998
Burglaries and thefts reported * A tuxedo and several other items worth a total of $7,440 were reported stolen from a 1989 tan Lincoln Towncar between 8:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Aug. 7 in the 200 block of McDonald. Another $250 of damage was done to the door.
S DOWNTOWN PARKING METERS.
August 16, 1998
* Approve ordinances, on final reading, to approve, adopt and appropriate the city’s $79.3 million budget for 1999; adopt the 1998 edition of the standard traffic ordinance; and annex a 1-acre lot already agreed to Aug. 4. * Approve an ordinance, on final reading, to establish the city’s Downtown Parking Advisory Board.
NEED A NEW LAWN? TIME IS AT HAND
August 16, 1998
Hot weather, weeds, insects and disease often take their toll on lawns by the end of the summer. Fall is the best time to renew bluegrass and fescue lawns. Overseeding is more than scattering seed and waiting for it to germinate. Seedbed preparation is as important for overseeding as it is for establishment of new turf. So before scattering expensive seed, take time to prepare the turf and correct any problems.
CUSTOMERS SAY BUSINESSES NOT AT THEIR SERVICE
August 16, 1998
Though it’s been called the most critical business area of the 1990s, it seems everybody has a horror story these days about poor customer service.
KU TO HOST ICE CREAM SOCIAL
August 16, 1998
Scoop from Boots, part of Hawk Week activities at Kansas University, will be held at 6:30 p.m. Monday at the Boots Adams Alumni Center. Students, faculty and staff are invited to attend the annual ice cream social that precedes Traditions Night at 8 p.m. Monday at Memorial Stadium.
RESIDENTS FIGHT FOR HOMES
August 16, 1998
The super speedway planned for Wyandotte County is expected to be an economic boon for the area. But bringing the track in means moving out people who have lived at the site for decades.
MAYER COLUMN
August 16, 1998
College football’s Heisman Trophy, basketball’s Wooden Trophy and women’s basketball’s Wade Trophy should go to people who stay the course and finish commitments to their schools. Yeah, I’m a gnarly old curmudgeon who’s light years behind the times. Nowadays, if you have it, you generally flaunt it, then take the money and run — to hell with education, college ties and coach loyalty. But if I’d had a vote on the Heisman after the 1997 football season, I’d have cast it for quarterback Peyton Manning of Tennessee rather than for defensive whiz Charles Woodson of Michigan.
TOP KU OFFICIALS DO HEAVY LIFTING
August 16, 1998
KU administrators put a little sweat equity into building good relationships with new students Saturday as they moved into residence halls.
BUMPER CROPS SPILLETH OVER
August 16, 1998
Because the bin-busting harvest follows a big wheat crop, much of it could wind up being dumped on the ground.
T REALIZE LIMITS OF SYSTEM, KAW VALLEY SAYS
August 16, 1998
Kaw Valley Center officials are frustrated by criticisms and the lack of support in dealing with problem kids.
S CAREER AND HIS INVOLVEMENT WITH THE GROUP.
August 16, 1998
My trashy gossip rack reading for the summer recounts in breathless tones the evolution of the penultimate nightlifers, and their in-your-face, just-try-and-stop-me brashness. Money to blow. Dames, broads. All-night parties drowning in a sea of booze and cigarette smoke. And all of it centered around Frank. Hot-headed Sinatra, his mother’s son, earthy and outrageous. Shawn Levy’s “Rat Pack Confidential: Frank, Dean, Sammy, Peter, Joey & the Last Great Showbiz Party,” (Doubleday, $24) recalls Sinatra’s voice, first revealed when a member of the Dorsey orchestra, made him famous. And through clever promotion, the biggest showbiz hit ever.
August 16, 1998
A Kaw Valley teen who kept a journal during her 16-month stay in state custody wrote this frequent entry: “Lord please help.”
FACES AND PLACES
August 16, 1998
Becky Foster has been promoted to director of interior design at Davis Design in Lincoln, Neb. Foster, a Lawrence native and graduate of Kansas University, also was recently honored by the Nebraska-Iowa Chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers for her work with corporate, health care and institutional clients. She is the daughter of Robert and Becky Foster of Lawrence. *
RUNNING DAYS ARE OVER SINCE CUSTODY ENDED
August 16, 1998
A 17-year-old Lawrence girl who ran away from and was eventually released from state custody says that group homes foster little more than bad memories.
LOCAL SPORTS BRIEFS
August 16, 1998
Oh, the difference a year makes. Last year at this time workers were under the gun to complete work on some of Free State High’s athletic venues as the first day of fall practices approached.
AFTER-SCHOOL CARE BOOKING UP
August 16, 1998
Teacher collaboration time will leave parents looking for someone to watch their children when school lets out early.
LANDSCAPE
August 16, 1998
You can go home again, but almost everything will be different. The house where I spent my boyhood is gone, and all I saw the last time was a vacant lot. The street that was gravel (how my mother hated that street on dusty days!) is now paved. The big Lombardy poplars I climbed in are gone, and so are the cottonwoods that had all that awful cotton blowing around. There’s a little shop in the printing office where I was the “devil” from ‘37 to ‘41. A new paper is published in the building where we danced on Saturday nights, the Persiana ballroom.