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Archive for Saturday, August 15, 1998

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LECTURE SERIES TRIES TO NARROW GAP BETWEEN TOWNGOWN
August 15, 1998
The Humanities Lecture Series continues its rich history by bringing four well-known speakers to Kansas University this year.
ALTERNATIVE THEATER VENUES LURE STUDENTS TO THE STAGE
August 15, 1998
Several local theater troupes offer Kansas University students a chance to be on the stage.
FLOWER FARM GIVES DAYLILY AND PEONY LOVERS CAUSE TO PAUSE
August 15, 1998
One of the larger daylily and peony farms in the world is only a few hours away.
INTERNATIONAL DIRECTOR KNOWS HIS FIELD
August 15, 1998
The new International Student Services director at Kansas University has experience as an educator and language consultant in Asia.
ILLS
August 15, 1998
The chief administrator at the Kansas University Medical Center is crafting a future for the state’s only teaching and research hospital.
THEATER, MUSIC STUDENTS USE COMPUTERS TO DESIGNCOMPOSE
August 15, 1998
Music, dance and theater productions utilize state-of-the-art computer wizardry.
TAKING CONTROL
August 15, 1998
If they don’t want politicians to reorganize higher education in Kansas, state education officials need to take the lead in recommending reforms. Kansans involved in higher education may feel that they survived a close call in the 1998 Kansas Legislature.
MELISSA LACEY/JOURNAL-WORLD PHOTO
August 15, 1998
Anthropology professor Don Stull has studied cattle feeding and meat-packing industries in southwest Kansas for more than a decade. He is shown with protective gear worn by plant workers.
CENTER A CLEARINGHOUSE FOR RESEARCH
August 15, 1998
A hometown boy has returned to Lawrence to run the Center for Research Inc.
S PROVOST AN EXPERIENCED JUGGLER
August 15, 1998
Kansas University provost David Shulenburger’s fingers are in many pies.
S MASTER PLAN, WHICH SAW A FORMAL REVISION LAST FALL, WILL BEGIN HAVING A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON THE LAWRENCE CAMPUS IN COMING YEARS.
August 15, 1998
Changing the face of Kansas University is no small task. As testimony to that, the master plan governing structural and landscape changes on campus was formally revised last fall for the first time in 25 years. In that revision were $258 million in alterations and additions for KU’s 7 million square feet of buildings and 950 acres.
THE ADAMS ALUMNI CENTER INTERIOR IS UPDATED AND INSPIRED.
August 15, 1998
Recently completed was a $1.2 million makeover of the K.S. “Boots” Adams Alumni Center, headquarters of the Kansas University Alumni Association. “It’s been a real nice overhaul,” said Mike Wellman, facilities manager. “The renovation involved our public areas and our kitchen and (food) service areas.”
ONLINE ACADEMY FOCUSES ON SPECIAL EDUCATION
August 15, 1998
An online academy aims to help teachers of students with disabilities.
KU OPERA TO TACKLE MOZART, GILBERT AND SULLIVAN
August 15, 1998
The lineup this year includes works by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and W.S Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan.
S COMPOSITIONS BEING HEARD AROUND THE WORLD
August 15, 1998
James Barnes, who is best known for his military band compositions, is focusing now on writing orchestral works.
EXPLORING DIFFERENT CULTURES
August 15, 1998
Here are the exhibitions that are planned this fall at Kansas University’s Museum of Anthropology: * “Lawrence Indian Arts Show,” Sept. 12-Oct. 25.
ARTS CENTER GIVES STUDENTS DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE
August 15, 1998
Two Kansas University students who work at the Lawrence Arts Center are learning about how art fits in with a community.
GOODBYE LONG LINES
August 15, 1998
A new computer program will mean no more standing in line for students.
DELUGE OF STUDENTS HITS CITY
August 15, 1998
The return of students to Lawrence means different things to different people.
KU SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA TO DEBUT PIANO CONCERTO
August 15, 1998
Auditions for the symphony orchestra are open to every Kansas University student.
LIED CENTER SEASON TO FOCUS ON LATINO INFLUENCES
August 15, 1998
The 1998-‘99 season will bring Itzhak Perlman, Bela Fleck and Patsy Cline to the Lied Center stage.
LCT LINEUP BEGINS WITH HIT BROADWAY MUSICAL
August 15, 1998
Lawrence Community Theatre’s managing artistic director says the theater is seeing younger faces in its audiences.
THE KANSAS UNIVERSITY CHORAL PROGRAM IS ADVENTUROUS.
August 15, 1998
If you love to sing in front of audiences, then write down these dates. Auditions for the Kansas University choirs will be Aug. 17 through 20. The sign-up sheet is posted opposite room 330 in Murphy Hall.
FALL RITUAL
August 15, 1998
Just like crocus are a sure sign of spring, the annual hubbub of students returning to Lawrence marks the coming of fall. It’s part of the annual cycle at Kansas University.
S TEMPS TO GATHER RARE FOSSILS
August 15, 1998
A pair of Kansas University botany professors will go to great lengths to collect plant fossils.
SCHOOL MEANS TIME TO IMMUNIZE
August 15, 1998
The Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department has been busy with immunizations as children prepare for another year at school.
HABITAT TO DEDICATE HOUSE ON SUNDAY
August 15, 1998
Lawrence Habitat for Humanity will hold a dedication service at 3 p.m. Sunday at 927 LaSalle for the Linda Benitez family. Lawrence Habitat for Humanity is an affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International. The organizations are nonprofit, ecumenical Christian housing organizations renovating decent shelter that is sold to people in need at no profit.
COMPUTER SEARCH ENGINE ONE FAST DEVELOPMENT
August 15, 1998
ProFusion, a search engine for Internet search engines developed at KU, should help researchers find things faster on the ‘net.
ONLINE CLASSES MEAN CONTINUOUS ACCESS
August 15, 1998
Online teaching reaches students who might not be able to attend traditional classes.
KEEN LISTENING SKILLS NECESSARY FOR KU OMBUDSMAN
August 15, 1998
KU faculty, students and staff unable to settle disputes can turn to a new assistance program dedicated to resolving grievances.
THE LATE HANK IBA OFTEN ACCUSED PHOG ALLEN OF INFECTING HIS OKLAHOMA STATE COWBOYS WITH VERTIGO BECAUSE OF HOW DIFFICULT IT WAS TO PLAY BASKETBALL IN HOCH AUDITORIUM.
August 15, 1998
Lightning struck in June 1991, and legendary old Hoch Auditorium had its guts burned out. What a place it had been for concerts, classes, lectures and, of course, Kansas basketball — up until spring 1955. After the storm clouds cleared, a massive rebuilding project was launched, and an attractive new facility opened with the title of Hoch Auditoria in Budig Hall.
LOOKING FOR SINGERSDANCERS
August 15, 1998
From Broadway musicals to classic Shakespeare, University Theatre offers something for everyone.
KU TROUPE INTRODUCES CHILDREN TO THEATER
August 15, 1998
For many area schoolchildren, Kansas University provides their first look at theater.
KU MARCHING BAND BOLSTERS ATHLETIC TEAMS
August 15, 1998
The student musicians perform at all home games and follow the teams to tournaments and rivalry games.
DOWNTOWN ABOUNDS WITH LIVE MUSIC
August 15, 1998
Some of the musical acts who have already come through Lawrence this year are Bela Fleck, Lisa Loeb and Thrill Kill Cult.
KU STUDENTS SEE CITY HALL AS CLASSROOM
August 15, 1998
Kansas University students want a seat on the Lawrence City Commission — not to vote, but to learn and offer input, KU’s student body president says.
EAT CUTS BACK ON NUMBER OF PRODUCTIONS
August 15, 1998
English Alternative Theatre will stage some thought-provoking plays in the coming months.
LACK OF RESPECT
August 15, 1998
To the editor: In watching the recent cooperation between the Kansas Department of Transportation and Rep. Vince Showbarger concerning the eastern leg of the K-10 Trafficway, I’ve noticed some disturbing similarities between how Haskell Indian Nations University is being treated and how the Cherokees of New Echota, Ga., were treated in their fight to the Supreme Court to prevent President Andrew Jackson from removing them.
DISTRICT COURT DIVORCES GRANTED
August 15, 1998
Rosemary Valverde, Lawrence, and Jorge A. Valverde, Lawrence Kimberly Ann Solomons, Lawrence, and David Menachem Solomons, Baldwin
EVENTS GIVE ARTISTS CHANCE TO SHOW WORKS
August 15, 1998
The community’s art events showcase the talents of local artists.
KU ATTRACTS MORE THAN $100 MILLION FOR RESEARCH
August 15, 1998
The Kansas University Medical Center expects to secure about $50 million in grants each year to support research on a wide range of health mysteries.
REGENTS PROVIDE LEADERSHIP AT UNIVERSITIES
August 15, 1998
The Kansas Board of Regents calls the shots at Kansas’ six state colleges, including Kansas University.
STUDENTS STOCK UP ON MARKET KNOWLEDGE
August 15, 1998
Business students at KU have the opportunity to play the market — with real money.
T THE SPANISH LANGUAGE TV CHANNEL ADDED WHEN THE RECENT ADDITIONS WERE MADE AT SUNFLOWER CABLEVISION?
August 15, 1998
Dan McGough, Sunflower’s general manager, responds: “Within any market, demographics and customer demand drive the issue of placement of foreign-language channels. Since joining Sunflower, I have received only two calls about adding “UniVision” (Spanish speaking) to our lineup. We did look into it. I personally called Kansas University, as well as inquired at the city. My research indicates that Lawrence has a very small Spanish-speaking population. Nevertheless, we at Sunflower Cablevision are continuing to measure the demand for foreign-language programming, and encourage community input that will help us measure demand for popular programming of all types.” Is there an ordinance in the city limiting the number of garage sales a residence may have?
KU SONGS ARE STEEPED IN TRADITION.
August 15, 1998
When Kansas University chemistry professor E.H.S. Bailey took a train trip with some colleagues in the 1880s, it occurred to him that the university was lacking a certain something. It wasn’t a top secret formula or bubbly concoction that Bailey was after. He wanted a school yell.
ALTERNATIVE THEATER VENUES
August 15, 1998
Here’s how you can contact the following theater troupes: * The Seem-To-Be Players: Ric Averill, artistic director, 842-6622.
DEMOLITION PROJECT MEANS PROGRESS
August 15, 1998
Hinch Hall and Taylor annex were demolished in the name of progress at the School of Nursing at KU Medical Center in Kansas City, Kan.
NEW GENERATION SOCIETY TAKES ADVANTAGE OF LAWRENCEKU
August 15, 1998
The New Generation Society, created about a year ago for retirees and others, already has more than 160 members.
August 15, 1998
Willie Lenoir earned a degree in math at Kansas University, but does most of his counting now on a dance floor.
TV, HOLLYWOOD FILMMAKERS SHOOT IN KANSAS
August 15, 1998
Several Lawrence residents will be seen on the silver screen this year.
MELISSA LACEY/JOURNAL-WORLD PHOTO
August 15, 1998
Vertebrate paleontology graduate student T.J. Meehan uses dental tools to flake away rock and field glue from the upper arm bone of “Lyle” the camarasaur at Kansas University’s Museum of Natural History.
NATIVE ART
August 15, 1998
The 10th annual Lawrence Indian Arts Show can be seen from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays Sept. 12 through Oct. 25 at Kansas University’s Museum of Anthropology. The Haskell Indian Art Market will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sept. 12 and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 13 at Haskell Indian Nations University, Haskell Avenue and 23rd Street.
A LOOK BACK
August 15, 1998
To the editor: Where’s Rusty’s Supermarket? Where’s the old fire engine and baseball diamond at South Park? Where’s the city limit sign at 23rd and Iowa? Where’s Allen’s Drive-in? Thank goodness Weaver’s is still there! (Keep it going, Joe).
STUDENTS TO DECIDE HOW TO SPEND FEE
August 15, 1998
The state will match special per-credit-hour technology fees for all Kansas Board of Regents schools.
WITH THREE FULL ACADEMIC YEARS NOW UNDER HIS BELT AS CHANCELLOR OF KANSAS UNIVERSITY, ROBERT HEMENWAY REFLECTS ON GOALS ACHIEVED AND LOOKS FORWARD TO THE NEXT CENTURY.
August 15, 1998
Kansas University Chancellor Robert Hemenway sat in one of several chairs at the conference table in his Strong Hall office and began to talk about his life as both teacher and student. Hemenway, who is known throughout the state as “the chancellor who teaches,” likes the idea of being a sort-of senior at KU. He did, after all, just finish his third full year at KU. And he hopes to complete his fourth year as strongly as he started his freshman campaign.
FILM STUDENTS FAMILIAR WITH WINNING AWARDS
August 15, 1998
The number of students signing up for Kansas University’s film studies program is increasing.
INNOVATIVE TEACHER A REAL WINNER
August 15, 1998
A longtime faculty member at the Kansas University School of Nursing received the first Phyllis Keeney Lawrence Teaching Award in Nursing.
CONSTRUCTION AND PAPERWORK WILL MARK THE COMING YEAR AT MURPHY HALL, ACCORDING TO THE FINE ARTS DEAN.
August 15, 1998
There’s no lack of recitals, dance programs and art shows scheduled for Kansas University’s coming school year, but Peter Thompson won’t be focusing only on stages and galleries this year. Thompson, dean of the school of fine arts, will be working with faculty members to prepare for the accreditation process the school undergoes every 10 years. The paperwork-intensive process has already begun and will continue through next summer, when a report is expected from the accrediting agencies: the National Association of Schools of Music and the National Association of Schools of Art and Design.
WANTED: GOOD HOME FOR LYLE, THE DINOSAUR
August 15, 1998
Kansas University has a large dinosaur named “Lyle,” but nowhere to show off its bones in an exhibit.
CASTING CALL
August 15, 1998
University Theatre will kick off its auditions week with a rally at 7 p.m. Aug. 19 in Crafton-Preyer Theatre, Murphy Hall. Open call will be Aug. 20-21, with callbacks on Aug. 22-24. Tickets for the shows will be available at the Murphy Hall Box Office, 864-3992; Lied Center Box Office, 864-ARTS; and the Student Union Activities Box Office in the Kansas Union, 864-3477.
S MUSICAL TASTES
August 15, 1998
Lawrence radio stations are designing their programming to fit their audiences.
BEHIND THE SCENES
August 15, 1998
Lawrence Community Theatre will open its 1998-‘99 season Sept. 25 with the popular Broadway musical “My Fair Lady.” Information about auditions and season tickets is available at the theater, 1501 N.H., or by calling 843-7469.
IN COMPUTER AGE, DEAN STRIVES TO TEACH PERSONAL TOUCH
August 15, 1998
The computer or the classroom: More Kansas University Medical Center students are finding that the way they are learning is changing.
TIPS KEEP PEONIES, DAYLILIES IN TOP FORM
August 15, 1998
Greg Jones, owner of Gilbert H. Wild and Sons, has 22 years of horticultural experience. He offers these tips for gardeners. For peonies: It’s important to plant them at the right depth. “The number one problem we hear of is `My peonies didn’t bloom.”’ Planting depth is key.
EFFECTS ON SMALL TOWNS
August 15, 1998
Garden City is a multicultural oasis in the middle of wheat country.
STRATEGY FOR BREAST CANCER IN EARLY STAGES OF TESTING
August 15, 1998
A melanoma technique could benefit breast cancer patients, a Kansas University Medical Center oncologist says.
MINORITY STUDENTS SET NEW TRADITION
August 15, 1998
Four of Kansas University’s minority student organizations this weekend are hosting the event, designed to make students feel more at home. Matt Gowen
MENTORING PROGRAM PAIRS STUDENTS WITH ALUMNI
August 15, 1998
The KU Alumni Association’s mentoring program is expected to be up and running this fall.
ARTIST FOLDS COLORFUL, DETAILED ORIGAMI QUILTS
August 15, 1998
Lawrence resident Nancy Loo Bjorge is reviving an art form she learned as a child.
WILLIAM A. HODGE
August 15, 1998
Services for William A.. Hodge, 63, Basehor, will be at 11 a.m. Thursday at the Quisenberry Chapel, Tonganoxie. Burial will be in Maple Grove Cemetery, Tonganoxie. Mr. Hodge died Friday, Aug. 14, 1998 at his home.
STREET PROJECTS TO CURB TRAFFIC
August 15, 1998
Upgrading broken curbs will squeeze traffic in a few areas beginning Monday. Terese Gorman, city engineer, announced that the following locations were set for curb removal and replacement during the coming week:
STATE GIVES HISTORIC SCHOOL NEW LEASE
August 15, 1998
The Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks will take back a historic stone school as part of its renewed lease of Clinton State Park with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
ORTELLA RENA HARROD
August 15, 1998
Services for Ortella Rena Harrod, 72, Lawrence, will be at 2 p.m. today at Warren-McElwain Mortuary. Burial will be in Memorial Park Cemetery. Mrs. Harrod died Friday, Aug. 14, 1998, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
TEACHERS LEARN THEIR WAY AROUND
August 15, 1998
New teachers get their first taste of class at new-teacher orientation.
AAAAH, THOSE GOOD OLD DAYS OF POST-CHRISTMAS TOURNEYS IN MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM.
August 15, 1998
Wonder how many older people grumble and swear as they park in Kansas City’s Kemper Arena wasteland and make their way into the hall for Big 12 basketball games — even something as exciting as the postseason tournament. How many more moan over the difficulty of locating their vehicles in the dark, and maybe finding them vandalized, stripped or, worse, stolen. There is fear of mugging. It happens.
FSHS BOOSTER CLUB HOLDING BARBECUE
August 15, 1998
A barbecue for parents and students of Free State High School will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. today in the high school parking lot. Donations will be accepted toward the FSHS Booster Club’s scholarship fund. The booster club is sponsoring the barbecue.
CORRECTION
August 15, 1998
A brief in Friday’s Journal-World about a barbecue for parents and students of Free State High School contained an incorrect date. The event will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday in the high school parking lot.
LARRY LEE KURTZ
August 15, 1998
Services for Larry Lee Kurtz, 35, Paola, will be held at 11 a.m. Monday at Warren-McElwain Mortuary, Lawrence. Burial will be in Eudora Cemetery. Mr. Kurtz died Thursday, Aug. 13, 1998, in Eudora.
VOICE.
August 15, 1998
It sounds musical. Beverly Gieszelmann pronounced “O” holding the vowel for five seconds as Sobha Puppala taped her voice.
VIEWS
August 15, 1998
Nearly 1,000 Kansas University and non-KU students took part in the KU Study Abroad program last year.
STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT MAKING CONNECTIONS
August 15, 1998
The incoming student body president at Kansas University wants to make a connection — as much with university administrators and state officials as with his constituents.
WITH THE HELP OF A $7.6 MILLION GRANT, A GROUP OF RESEARCHERS AT KANSAS UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER HAS LAUNCHED A MAJOR STUDY INTO THE VARYING DEGREES OF RECOVERY AFTER STROKE.
August 15, 1998
This year, the Center on Aging at Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kan., received the biggest National Institutes of Health grant in the history of the medical center: $7.6 million. The funds will be used for the largest random study of stroke recovery ever undertaken.
IN CASE YOU WANT TO PRACTICELITTLE
August 15, 1998
If you’re a true Jayhawk, you’ll want to review the lyrics of “Crimson and the Blue,” as well as “I’m a Jayhawk,” so you can sing along with the KU band. And don’t forget to brush up on the “Rock Chalk Chant.” Crimson and the Blue
KU OFFERS STUDENTS CHANCE AT ALL FOUR MILITARY BRANCHES
August 15, 1998
Kansas University’s ROTC programs offer it all: Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines.
TO SEARCH SEARCH ENGINES
August 15, 1998
The ProFusion address is http://profusion.ittc.ukans.edu/info.html.
S STORIES WERE WELL-KNOWN, BUT HE SURPRISED A CROWD AT THE 1952 BASKETBALL BANQUET.
August 15, 1998
The older you get the more you’re inclined to realize you should have saved a lot of things you pitched. It’s amazing how the passage of years enhances the value of some treasures. Let’s focus on a 1952 item that few ever dreamed would bring $550 at an auction for the local heart association campaign in May 1995.
T HAVE LOST HIS CADILLAC TO FIRE.
August 15, 1998
Journal-World files of 1956 don’t quite go into the regal depth of another Phog Allen legend at Kansas. A news brief says simply:
THE JAYHAWK AND OTHER UNIVERSITY SYMBOLS ARE A COTTAGE INDUSTRY.
August 15, 1998
Kansas University researchers are brainy. But their brain fruit produced less income for the school last year than the cartoon bird known as the Jayhawk and other school logos. Patent and copyright royalties from research added about $490,000 to university coffers last year, according to university figures.
A PSYCHOLOGY PROFESSOR STUDIES ATTITUDES TOWARD THE OVERWEIGHT.
August 15, 1998
If you’re fat, it’s your fault. That’s what most Americans think, Chris Crandall, a Kansas University professor of psychology, said. America doesn’t like fat.
MUSEUMS ANOTHER TEACHING TOOL ON CAMPUS
August 15, 1998
Kansas University’s museums are a big attraction for both students and visitors. More than 300,000 people visit the museums each year, officials estimate.
COMPUTER SYSTEM UPGRADE ONLINE
August 15, 1998
Kathleen McCluskey-Fawcett, Kansas University’s associate provost, academic affairs, has a big job to do. Her offices are bringing university records on-line, changing freshman/sophomore advising and giving the campus a front door.
AN EMERGENCY DEVICE WOULD BRING HELP FOR DRIVERS INVOLVED IN AN ACCIDENT.
August 15, 1998
It’s every driver’s nightmare: crashing in the middle of the night in the middle of nowhere. No one is in sight, and you don’t have a cellular phone. Or maybe you have a car phone, but you’re knocked unconscious and don’t have the faculties to use it.
August 15, 1998
Phog Allen’s granddaughter has read it and heard it a lot of times, but that doesn’t make her any more accepting of two misconceptions. Judy Allen Morris of Lawrence always bristles when it happens. Fly-by-night television commentators and other non-area media who show up for an in-and-out dash to Lawrence periodically get it wrong. They may remark that Wilt Chamberlain broke the color line at Kansas University and that the Jayhawks play in Allen Fieldhouse, the House That Wilt Built. Wilt Chamberlain, who returned for his jersey retirement last January, definitely had a hand in needed civil rights changes in and around Lawrence. And he certainly drew large crowds to the fieldhouse in the three years he was here (one year freshman, two years varsity). But Judy’s storied granddad was also a major force in integration of the KU program.
GRADUATE SCHOOLS A DIVERSE GROUP
August 15, 1998
At Kansas University, graduate programs are decentralized and generally handled by specific schools. But Andrew Debicki, dean of the graduate school, still plays a role. Debicki, who also is dean of KU’s International Programs, says a major component of his job is the review of the many independent graduate programs at the university.
KU NO STRANGER TO NATIONAL RANKINGS
August 15, 1998
Many programs at KU have been recognized as leaders in their fields, according to University Relations. * KU’s Intercampus Program in Communicative Disorders ties for 10th nationwide, according to rankings in the March 2 issue of U.S. News and World Report.
KANSAS GEOLOGICAL SURVEY STUDIES OIL, GAS AND WATER
August 15, 1998
The Kansas Geological Survey keeps residents informed about the state’s water, energy and geology.
NEW SYSTEM TO AID CAMPUS PARKING
August 15, 1998
The Lied Center parking lot on West Campus will become the hub for a Park and Ride program, which is new this year at Kansas University.
AUDIO READER VOLUNTEERS KNOW SOMEONE OUT THERE IS LISTENING.
August 15, 1998
Imagine not being able to read. Whether it’s because of an eye problem, fatigue or severe arthritis, the thought of not reading is something that drives volunteers at the Kansas University-Audio Reader Network.
AMBASSADORS HELP CONVINCE PROSPECTS THAT KU IS THE PLACE TO BE.
August 15, 1998
It’s not exactly a health club, but Kansas University Ambassadors do get a workout while giving tours to prospective students and family members. In a typical tour, a group of up to about 20 people will start at Strong Hall, walk their way down to the Chi Omega fountain, head down Naismith Drive by Learned Hall, back up behind Wescoe, down Jayhawk Boulevard past Fraser to the Kansas Union before heading back to Strong about 45 minutes after they left.
LOOKING IT UP NOW EASIER THAN EVER AT KU LIBRARIES
August 15, 1998
The libraries at Kansas University seek ways to make information readily accessible to students.
FLEEING FOR FUNDS
August 15, 1998
Faculty flight at Kansas’ six state universities is a true problem. Here’s a look at the numbers that contribute to the problem: * KU average faculty salary, $53,790; average faculty salary at peer universities, $60,972. KU salaries relative to peers, 88.2 percent.
FOR THE KIDS
August 15, 1998
Theatre for Young People will stage two shows this season, both directed by Jeanne Klein: * “Wolf Child,” by Edward Mast, Sept. 26, Crafton-Preyer Theatre. The story is about a boy who is raised by wolves and then discovered and trained by a missionary couple. The play is for children in grades 4-6.
IN THE GALLERIES
August 15, 1998
Here are the exhibitions that can be seen this academic school year at the Helen Foresman Spencer Museum of Art: * “Painting, Scraping, Carving … Asian Ceramics,” decorative ceramics from Japan, China, Thailand, Korea and Vietnam, through Aug. 20, White Gallery.
ART MUSEUM SERVES COMMUNITYSTUDENTS
August 15, 1998
The Helen Foresman Spencer Museum of Art will open its exhibition season with a show featuring the works of older women.
RAID
August 15, 1998
A theatrical production at Oak Hill Cemetery will take a look at the survivors of the bloody raid on Lawrence.
WANT TO PLAY A SACBUTS? THEN COLLEGIUM MUSICUM MIGHT BE RIGHT FOR YOU
August 15, 1998
Music history majors at Kansas University are required to play with an early music group.
THEATER DESIGNER TRAVELS THE GLOBE FOR IDEAS
August 15, 1998
A Kansas University theater professor is racking up frequent-flyer miles.
UNIVERSITY DANCE SEASON PROMISES FANCY FOOTWORK
August 15, 1998
This year’s dance card features troupes from Seattle, New York, Miami, Fla., and St. Petersburg, Russia.
THE KANSAS UNIVERSITY CHOIRS WILL PERFORM THE FOLLOWING CONCERTS THIS YEAR:
August 15, 1998
* Sept. 25: KU Combined Choirs, with KU Symphony Orchestra, 7:30 p.m., Lied Center. * Nov. 1: “Songs of Travel,” featuring KU Concert Choir, Men’s Glee Club, University Singers and Women’s Chorale, 7:30 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, 2415 Clinton Pkwy.
THE WEST SIDE FOLK SERIES HAS ANNOUNCED ITS FALL SCHEDULE:
August 15, 1998
* Aug. 29: Carrie Newcomer Band, West Side Presbyterian Church, 1024 Kasold Dr. * Sept. 24: Greg Greenway, location to be announced.
LAWRENCE INDIAN ARTS SHOW DRAWS ENTRIES FROM ACROSS U.S.
August 15, 1998
The Lawrence Indian Arts Show and the Haskell Indian Art Market are celebrating their 10th anniversaries.
UNFAIR DENIAL
August 15, 1998
The logic of a Kentucky school district in denying two girls National Honor Society induction is hard to defend. Last April, 33 high school students were inducted into the National Honor Society in the Grant County, Ky., school gym. Actually, 35 youngsters had qualified for the coveted designation as a society member but two were not included in the ceremonies because they were unwed teen-age mothers.
HOSPITAL REPORT DISMISSALS
August 15, 1998
Tina Marie Plumlee and baby boy, Lawrence. Donna Kaye Workman, Lecompton.
IS THERE AN ORDINANCE IN THE CITY LIMITING THE NUMBER OF GARAGE SALES A RESIDENCE MAY HAVE TO PREVENT IT FROM BECOMING A FLEA MARKET TYPE EVENT?
August 15, 1998
“There is not a city ordinance that specifically limits the number of garage sales a resident may have,” City Manager Mike Wildgen said. “If, however, garage/yard sales are conducted every week or two, the city considers that to be a business enterprise. “Most businesses must be in areas zoned for that purpose. Perpetual garage sales would violate the city’s zoning ordinance if the property is zoned residential.”
CHARLES GORDON STUCKER
August 15, 1998
Services for Charles Gordon Stucker, 74, Evergreen, Colo., will be at 1 p.m. Tuesday at Oak Hill Cemetery, Lawrence. Mr. Stucker died Wednesday, Aug. 12, 1998.
POLICE FISH STOLEN AUTO OUT OF KANSAS RIVER
August 15, 1998
Lawrence police hooked a “keeper” Friday morning while investigating the report of a partially submerged car on the north bank of the Kansas River. The black 1993 Grand Am was left there by thieves who ransacked the car after stealing it Thursday night or Friday morning in East Lawrence. Ditched at a riverfront park boat ramp at Eighth and Oak, the car was found in the river, with dirty water covering the tires and halfway up the hood.
RESTAURANT
August 15, 1998
A gas-line break closed the McDonald’s at Sixth and Wakarusa Friday evening. It took emergency personnel and utility workers five hours to fix the leak and air out the restaurant and parking lot.
LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORT
August 15, 1998
Burglaries and thefts reported * Police are investigating a 44-year-old Lawrence woman who allegedly applied for a credit card under a false name and charged $3,335 between Feb. 19 and May 13 of this year. Sgt. George Wheeler said the Colorado bank that supplied the credit card will be forced to take the loss. The woman has not been arrested or interviewed by Lawrence police yet, Wheeler said.
REPORTS
August 15, 1998
* Douglas County Sheriff’s personnel arrested Fedro Dillion III, 46, a transient, Friday on Shawnee County warrants for aggravated burglary, aggravated assault, battery and criminal damage to property less than $500. He was booked at 2:15 p.m. into Douglas County Jail, and released to Shawnee County officials at 3:52 p.m.
BATTERY BAGS SCORE STATE AWARD
August 15, 1998
A community education pollution prevention program coordinated by the city’s division of waste reduction and recycling is a state award winner. The Lawrence program, organized by the city along with Hamm Cos., which owns and operates a regional landfill, is among the recipients of the 1998 Pollution Prevention Awards for Excellence from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment.
WILL THE VICTIMS OF THE EMBASSY BOMBINGS BE ELIGIBLE FOR BURIAL IN ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY?
August 15, 1998
Arlington National Cemetery officials said that the three members of the Armed Forces killed in the Nairobi blast died while on active duty and meet normal criteria for burial in the cemetery. The other nine will be eligible only by special exception. Three people, two state department workers and the son of a state department worker, have received presidential exceptions to the policy already. Those eligible for burial at Arlington include active duty member of the Armed Forces, retired members of the Armed Forces, disabled former member of the Armed Forces, decorated former member of the Armed Forces, elective officials who were honorably discharged, Supreme Court justices who were honorably discharged, prisoners of war, and the widows or minor children of any eligible person.
S TALE IS STILL FAR FROM A HAPPY ENDING
August 15, 1998
The Lawrence Humane Society is struggling with the care of “Lady,” an abused and abandoned German pointer.
CHECK OUT THE WILD THINGS WITH A VISIT TO THIS KU ZOO
August 15, 1998
A Kansas University organization is linking students through their computers.
JACK FRANCIS JESSUP
August 15, 1998
Graveside services for Jack Francis Jessup, 74, McLouth, will be at 11 a.m. Monday at Wild Horse Cemetery, McLouth. Mr. Jessup died Friday, Aug. 14, 1998, at Providence Medical Center, Kansas City, Kan.
IN 1898
August 15, 1998
On Aug. 14, 1898, the Lawrence Journal reported: “In cutting away trees along the ravine west of Kasold’s grocery on Pinckney street (Sixth and Indiana) a loafing place has been cleared out, and the street will be much more decent for passerby. The street commissioner has also been cutting the trees in the Pinckney street park, and on the opening of school the children will have a much better play ground, and the appearance of things have been greatly improved.” — Courtesy Watkins Community Museum
DAYLILY TRIP
August 15, 1998
Visitors can stop by the Gilbert H. Wild and Sons nursery, 3044 Missouri Highway 37, near Sarcoxie, Mo., to tour or to shop. Because the plants are still growing in the fields, customers will have their selections shipped to them on a later date. For a catalog, call (417) 548-3514.
LAWRENCE HIGH SCHOOL HAS RELEASED ITS HONOR ROLL FOR SECOND SEMESTER OF THE 1997-98 SCHOOL YEAR.
August 15, 1998
Sophomores Philip N. Garito, Evan Grosshans, Clint A. Morgan, Ryan Morgan, Jessica Rodriguez, Crystal Belle Rogers, Dennis Shafer, Justin W. Shmalberg, Ivy C. Wagner, Christopher A. Williams, Kristin Wong, Janet E. Stephens, Carl W. Magnuson, Steven M. Davis, Kyo Lee, Christopher Reinhard, Susan L. Heiman, Mark Kelly, Katrina R. Scott, Melissa A. Pringle, Elisabeth A. Betzen, Cynthia M. Belcher, William B. Kinnersley, Mark Huston, Lindsey Alberding, John Connolly, Jessica L. Vanek, Gabriel Lewis-O’Connor, Sarah A. McGee, Jamie A. Dasenbrock, Jeremy M. Ward, Arundhati Pal, Dominique Cornelius, Heidi Habiger, Erica Johnson-Wanzer, Jennifer Perez, Ellen Shackelford, Craig Vanblaricum, Kara Laing, Elizabeth Bretthauer, Katy M. Maxon, Fletcher G. Hamel, G. Thomas Holland III, David E. Bennett, Lydia B. Hull, Natalie F. Ralston, Marina Siltchenko, Rebecca Saathoff, Jamie Devore, Ted Bender, Fallon Farokhi, Gayle L. Hoppingarner, Steven Byington, Brooke Seymour, Sommer Heiserman, Himeezembi Kamatuka, Troy Shaw, Michelle Chappell, Lori Hamilton, Angela Perry, Jessica Hunt, Laura Maddux, Natalie B. Wilson, Shannon Curry, Fiona Hunter, Thomas Murray, Kelly A. Rathbun, Sihao Xia, Rachel Merz, Danielle May, Kristina Denny, Meghan K. Rahmeier, Mason A. Umholtz, Joseph D. Heacock, Aubrey Vaughn, Tim Donnally, Amber Corbett, Kyle C. Sylvester, Michael Sawyer, Shandi Reeves, Amanda N. Woodward, Jennifer Baum, Sarah Buttenhoff, Abby Davis, Kayla Dreiling, Rachel Eck, Allison R. Moore, Nicole C. Wilcox, Kristina Young.
A STUDY DONE BY A DOCTOR AND A REGISTERED NURSE AT THE KANSAS UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER REVEALED THAT IV SOLUTIONS WERE USING TOO MUCH SUGAR.
August 15, 1998
The findings must have appeared too straightforward to be believed. Too much sugar was being used in intravenous nutrition solutions in at least a quarter of academic medical centers in America. But that was the exact conclusion reached in a study published by Dr. Paul Schloerb, professor of surgery and director of nutritional support services at the Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kan. The study was co-authored by Schloerb and Jeanne Henning, a registered nurse in pediatric surgery at KUMC, and it appeared in the January issue of the journal Archives of Surgery.
SALARIES LURE PROFESSORS FROM KANSAS
August 15, 1998
KU’s chancellor says the faculty brain drain is a lesson in economics. Pay competitive salaries, keep the best faculty. Pay lame wages, see them picked off by other universities.
ENDOWMENT POSTS BANNER YEAR
August 15, 1998
The Kansas University Endowment Association has a new building and record aid to the university.
S PUBLIC FILES ARRIVE AT KU
August 15, 1998
In July, officials with Kansas University and the state hired a Lenexa-based architectural firm to handle the design of the Dole Institute for Public Service and Public Policy.
S OPEN FOR TALKSREFERRALS
August 15, 1998
Students who need to talk to someone can use Kansas University’s Counseling and Psychological Services office.
MAKE THE CALL
August 15, 1998
Students wanting to talk to someone in the office may call 864-2277. Hours of Kansas University’s Counseling and Psychological Services office are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays, and 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays.
MIKE YODER/JOURNAL-WORLD PHOTO
August 15, 1998
Betty Anderson, Ottawa, left, and Patty Mathews, Overland Park, right, do a read through of some newspaper articles before taping them for KU’s Audio-Reader Network.
S THE FOLK? RIGHT HERE IN RIVER CITY
August 15, 1998
West Side Folk is again offering a bountiful fall season, one that will bring back Connie Dover and Roger Landes as well as Greg Greenway.
OPERATIC OVERTURES
August 15, 1998
Opera will present three shows this academic year: * “Xerxes,” by George Frederick Handel, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 17, 2:30 p.m. Oct. 18 and 7:30 p.m. Oct. 19, Swarthout Recital Hall.
GOING NATURAL
August 15, 1998
Here is a list of the exhibits scheduled at Kansas University’s Natural History Museum, 14th Street and Jayhawk Boulevard: * “British Gas Wildlife Photographer of the Year” exhibition, featuring photographs of wildlife from around the world, through Sept. 6.
EAT TREATS
August 15, 1998
English Alternative Theatre’s 1998-‘99 season includes: * A staged reading of “Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde,” by Moises Kaufman, 8 p.m. Sept. 11, Swarthout Recital Hall, Murphy Hall.