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Archive for Wednesday, November 12, 1997

PROGRAM TO SHOWCASE EASY WAYS TO COOK FOR DIABETICS

November 12, 1997

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Cooking Q &A by Susan Krumm

I was told that you are going to do a program on cooking for the diabetic. Is that true?

Yes. At 6:30 p.m. Nov. 20, I will present "Diabetic Cooking Made Easy" at the Douglas County Extension Office at the Douglas County 4-H Fairgrounds, 2110 Harper.

The program is designed to put practical knowledge to use in the kitchen to improve a diabetic's eating habits. Healthy eating is the first step in taking care of diabetes.

After demonstrating how to create simple, delicious menus with the diabetic in mind, participants will sample meal choices.

Participants will be put on a mailing list to receive a newsletter for several months featuring menu ideas designed for diabetics.

Preregister for the program by noon Tuesday by contacting K-State Research and Extension-Douglas County at 843-7058. A fee will be charged to defray the cost of food samples.

What exactly is a "capon" and how to you prepare it?

A capon is a rooster that has been gelded and fed intensively so it is larger and plumper than the ordinary chicken. A capon averages 6 to 8 pounds in weight while a normal broiler-fryer would weigh from 1.5 to 4 pounds. The capon has an abundance of white flesh that is marbled with fat, unlike the typical chicken whose fat is pocketed.

A capon is usually prepared in any way appropriate for a chicken or a turkey. It can be roasted in a preheated 325-degree oven, allowing roughly 15 to 20 minutes per pound for an unstuffed bird. Poultry should be cooked to a minimum internal temperature of 165 degrees.

Incidentally, if you were thinking a capon was a fish, you aren't off your rocker. The term "capon" has been given to other foods, usually signifying a degree of luxury.

For example, a Norfolk capon is a type of red herring. To the French, "capon" is a term used for a rare Mediterranean fish with a large, boxlike head. Capon can also refer to a castrated rabbit. So take your pick.

Can I substitute anise extract for anise seed in a recipe?

Yes. One teaspoon of anise extract may be used in place of 1-1/2 teaspoons of anise seed.

I have some stainless steel flatware that has a bluish discoloration on it. What causes it and how can I remove it?

Some types of stainless steel will take on a bluish cast when washed in the dishwasher because of heat and the alkalinity of automatic dishwasher detergent. The discoloration can be removed by using a paste of baking soda and water or a stainless steel cleaner.

Why do my stainless steel serving spoons have rust on them after they've gone through the dishwasher?

When stainless steel (knife, spoon, pan, etc.) is made, a passivation process forms a protective oxide film on the surface of the steel. It is this film of oxide that makes stainless steel "stainless." When it is removed, corrosion or rusting will take place as with ordinary steel, though at a slower rate.

Certain foods will remove this oxide film -- table salt, vinegar, salad dressings, milk and milk products, fruits and juices, tomatoes and tomato products and butter.

If the stainless is washed, rinsed and dried thoroughly, the oxygen in the air will heal the breaks in the oxide film and return the stainless property to the steel. But if food is not washed off promptly (for example, when a few dishes and flatware are left in the dishwasher until a full load accumulates), the air cannot heal the break and corrosion will occur.

Unfortunately, there is no permanent solution. To minimize rusting, rinse or wash as soon as possible. Polishing with a silver or stainless steel cleaner may temporarily remove the corrosion.

I'm allergic to milk and eggs, but I understand there is a pumpkin pie recipe that substitutes tofu. Have you heard of it?

Here is a Tofu Pumpkin Pie recipe developed by the Soyfoods Association of America. For more information about soymilk and other soy foods, call the United Soybean Board Soy Hot Line at 1-800-TALK-SOY.

Tofu Pumpkin Pie

10 ounce soft silken tofu, blended in a blender until smooth

1 16-ounce can pumpkin

and tomato products and butter.

If the stainless is washed, rinsed and dried thoroughly, the oxygen in the air will heal the breaks in the oxide film and return the stainless property to the steel. But if food is not washed off promptly (for example, when a few dishes and flatware are left in the dishwasher until a full load accumulates), the air cannot heal the break and corrosion will occur.

Unfortunately, there is no permanent solution. To minimize rusting, rinse or wash as soon as possible. Polishing with a silver or stainless steel cleaner may temporarily remove the corrosion.

I'm allergic to milk and eggs, but I understand there is a pumpkin pie recipe that substitutes tofu. Have you heard of it?

Here is a Tofu Pumpkin Pie recipe developed by the Soyfoods Association of America. For more information about soymilk and other soy foods, call the Unitedallows in all recipes due to possible changes in texture or consistency.

-- Susan Krumm is an Extension agent in home economics and consumer science with K-State Research & Extension-Douglas County, 2110 Harper. She can be reached at 843-7058.

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