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Archive for Wednesday, June 26, 1996

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SOUND OFF
June 26, 1996
I was a grade school student in Lawrence in 1980 and, at the request of a teacher, took some IQ tests. Are my scores available to me now through the district? Rand Weseman, assistant superintendent, said student data including name, address, phone number and transcripts (grades seven through 12) are maintained indefinitely. With the exception of special education students, testing data is not maintained, he said. When a student has reached the age of 18, all rights of accessibility to records previously assigned to parents or legal guardians are transferred to the eligible student unless the student is legally adjudicated to be an incapacitated person. Unless you were identified with an IEP as a special education student, it is doubtful that your test results would still be on file, Weseman said.
NEW REGENTS BRING LEGAL EXPERTISE
June 26, 1996
The Kansas Board of Regents doesn’t have to go far to obtain legal advice. Four of nine people who serve on the governing body of the state’s public universities are lawyers.
REGENTS REVIEW TUITION DECISIONS
June 26, 1996
State university regents are on the verge of tuition and budget decisions.
SHAWNEE RIPS RAIDERS
June 26, 1996
Shawnee One struck early and often in its 10-0, run-rule baseball victory over Lawrence’s Raiders on Tuesday night at Ice Field. Shawnee torched Lawrence starter Mark Shepard for eight runs and seven hits in the first inning of the five-inning contest.
JAVA BREAK JR. SCORES BIG
June 26, 1996
After about two months in business, the specialty store that spun-off from Java Break is reporting good sales. Derek Hogan, who owns both stores, opened the second Java Break store, called Java Break Jr. Coffee and Tea Merchants, as an outlet for his retail merchandise. The original Java Break, 17 E. Seventh, will celebrate its two-year anniversary in July.
LABEL AS WRONG
June 26, 1996
To Jordana Arnold, news that Hillary Rodham Clinton consults spiritual advisors and holds conversations with the dead is a cheap shot. “It’s very misconstrued by a lot of people,” said Arnold, a massage therapist and intuitive counselor, or channeler, who lives in Lawrence. “It’s been, ‘Let’s burn her at the stake — she’s a witch!’”
RENOVATION PLANS BANK ON HISTORIC APPROVAL
June 26, 1996
A Lawrence developer plans to renovate a former downtown bank into retail space for national retailers.
FREON BECOMING HOT COMMODITY
June 26, 1996
Car owners will be hit with higher and higher freon prices for their air conditioners as supplies of the newly banned-from-production refrigerant dwindle.
DISTRICT COURT
June 26, 1996
Divorces granted Teresa M. Tayer, Lawrence, and Eytan Tayer, Lawrence.
RICHARD GWIN/JOURNAL-WORLD PHOTOS
June 26, 1996
Harvest time has begun slipping across Douglas County, starting in the south. Kirk Wiscombe, above, harvested his crop Tuesday afternoon on some of the 500 acres he farms with his father on the Douglas/Franklin county line.
CRIME STOPPERS SEEKS CREDIT CARD THIEF
June 26, 1996
A man who racked up more than $2,000 of purchases with a credit card he stole from a Lawrence firefighter is being targeted by the local Crime Stoppers program. Lawrence police said that between 7 a.m. June 7 and 7 a.m. June 8, the man broke into a pickup truck at Lawrence Fire Department Station No. 2, 1941 Haskell, and removed a wallet.
COUNTY TO AMEND FRONTAGE REQUIREMENTS
June 26, 1996
Douglas County commissioners are expected to amend the requirement they passed in December that rural tracts have at least 250 feet of road frontage in order for a building permit to be issued. Commission Chairman Louie McElhaney wants the authority to waive that requirement for people who owned tracts of land before the requirement was in place but only now are trying to obtain a building permit.
TOMATO PASSION SPURS EXTREMES
June 26, 1996
If I had to catalog my excesses, there’s no doubt that my vegetable garden would require its own volume. Within that, however, would be a chapter devoted entirely to overindulgences I have committed in the name of the tomato. This year’s tomato plant count stands at a qualified 29 — that is, not including half a dozen volunteers that have escaped the weed hoe and again as many tomatillos, the husk tomatoes used in salsa.
CITY BRIEFS
June 26, 1996
Impact fees draw split vote Impact fees on new development moved a step closer to law Tuesday night.
LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORT
June 26, 1996
Police reports * Rashidi E. McClelland, 18, 1010 N.J., was arrested early Tuesday after he allegedly struck a police officer and hit a 17-year-old Lawrence girl with a barbell bar he had thrown through the window of her car. Police Sgt. Susan Hadl said officers were called to the address shortly after 2 a.m. and were told at that time that shots had been fired. Hadl said that after officers arrived and started to question the teen-age girl, McClelland became angry and struck an officer several times. He was booked into jail at 2:35 a.m. on counts of battering a law enforcement officer, two counts of battery and a count of criminal damage to property.
LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORT
June 26, 1996
Burglaries and thefts reported * Antique china, lawn furniture, a camper shell, tools and other items valued together at $1,670 were taken between 6 p.m. Saturday and 8:30 p.m. Sunday from the 150 section of East 1100 Road, Baldwin.
SOUND OFF
June 26, 1996
Why has the Big Eight conference not had more say about what’s happening in the Big 12 conference? Is there a time lock on this merger? Can the Big Eight return to its original setup? The Big 12 conference is not an expanded Big Eight conference. It is a brand-new conference. Any school that leaves the new conference before the year 2000 faces substantial monetary penalties.
SOUND OFF
June 26, 1996
Why does a major contractor, like Terravest Construction, operate a commercial business in a residential area? Shouldn’t they be required to be in an area zones for commercial use? Gene Shaughnessy, chief building inspector for Lawrence, said the company’s original office at 4104 Trail Rd. was given a temporary permit through December 1995. Owner of Terravest Construction Co., J. Stewart, requested a extension, which was granted through June 30.
FUND HELPS FAMILY THAT LOST HOME
June 26, 1996
A contribution fund for a family displaced from their home by a recent fire has been set up at a Lawrence bank. Jo and Charles Collins and their two sons have been residing at the Travelodge Motel since Thursday, when a fire that began in their kitchen gutted most of their mobile home in Brookwood Mobile Home Community.
REGENTS BIOGRAPHIES
June 26, 1996
William R. Docking, 45, is a bank president in Arkansas City and managing member of an oil production company in Oxford. He has a bachelor’s degree in political science, master’s degree in business administration and law degree from Kansas University. He was appointed to the board in 1995. The Democrat’s term expires Dec. 31, 1998. His father, Robert, was elected to four terms as governor of Kansas. Thomas E. Hammond, 42, is a Wichita lawyer specializing in labor litigation, workers’ compensation and personal injury law. He has a law degree from Washburn University and a bachelor’s degree in education from Kansas University. He joined the board in 1994. The Democrat’s term expires Dec. 31, 1997.
LEONARD A. WALKER
June 26, 1996
Services for Leonard A. Walker, 81, Lawrence, are pending at Rumsey-Yost Funeral Home. Mr. Walker died Tuesday, June 25, 1996, at the St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center in Topeka. Survivors include his wife, Violet, of the home.
HOUSE RULES HELP MAKE SITTING A CAKE WALK
June 26, 1996
While running out the door, the mother hastily tells you to help yourself to anything in the kitchen. Once the children are in bed, you go to see what “anything” includes and find a scrumptious looking chocolate cake, uncut, sitting on the counter. Stop! Your mouth may be watering, but don’t cut into that cake. Food rule: Don’t be the first to cut any pies or cakes unless your employer specifically says that it was baked for you. That could be somebody’s birthday cake for the next day and is therefore obviously off limits. The same goes for unopened packages, don’t get into the freezer or other food that is obviously being saved.
FOR MANY YOUTHS THEIR FIRST JOB HAS THEM SITTING PRETTY
June 26, 1996
Being prepared for the unexpected is just one of the many things baby sitters must be.
CITY BOARDS PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION STUDY
June 26, 1996
Three city players have agreed to play ball to study public transportation.
LEGAL BATTLE OVER GRAVESITE CONTINUES
June 26, 1996
Gov. Bill Graves thinks state officials who ordered a Tonganoxie grave exhumed last week — without telling parents of the deceased until after the fact — did “everything properly,” a representative said Tuesday.
TRAFFICWAY PUT BACK ON TRACK
June 26, 1996
After months of silence, South Lawrence Trafficway planners have reopened discussion about where the eastern five miles of the road might go.
TACTICS EASE SITTER SEARCH
June 26, 1996
You dream of a night out: a romantic dinner, perhaps followed by a show or a walk in the park. A night without the children? This is possible with a baby sitter, but finding one you feel comfortable with can be a trick. Bobbie Gish, Lawrence, found her baby sitter, Nicole Eudaly, 16, Lawrence, through their church. Eudaly helped at First United Methodist with Vacation Bible School. By getting to know children at church and distributing fliers with her name and desire to baby-sit, she quickly got jobs.
SUSHI? LAWRENCE SAYS YES AND COMES BACK FOR MORE
June 26, 1996
A mainstay of the Asian diet has found a place in a Lawrence supermarket.
DOMESTIC DISPUTE LANDS RAYFORD IN JAIL
June 26, 1996
Former Kansas Jayhawk point guard Calvin Rayford was arrested Tuesday afternoon for allegedly hitting his girlfriend, Lawrence police reported Tuesday. About 1:30 p.m., Lawrence police were called to the 2300 block of Murphy Drive in reference to a domestic dispute, police representative Sgt. Susan Hadl said.
BEDORE COLUMN
June 26, 1996
Strange things can, and do happen on NBA Draft Day. Take last year, for instance, when Oklahoma State signee Martin Lewis was selected in the second round by the Golden State Warriors.
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
June 26, 1996
* Ruby Harris to Stephen L. Sr. and Betty J. Tyler; 517 N. Eighth. * Thomas J. and Marilyn J. Dobski to Henry and Mary Butler; lot 20 in the Masters at Alvamar.