Advertisement

Archive for Thursday, September 8, 1994

September 8, 1994

Advertisement

The university is bucking a national trend by significantly increasing enrollment of students in its master's of business administration program.

It's getting harder to find an empty desk in the MBA classes at Kansas University.

Enrollment in the master's of business administration program on KU's main campus in Lawrence increased 40 percent this fall.

At the KU Regents Center in Overland Park, which serves working adults taking night classes, enrollment doubled in the past year.

For the first time, a 60-student MBA class was admitted this spring semester. Fears that decision would reduce the size of this fall semester's class were unfounded. Fall enrollment climbed 14 percent.

"We did some scrambling, but these were good growing pains," said Dave Collins, associate director of master's degree programs at KU.

There are 420 MBA students at KU, he said. That's not a record, but represents an increase in the past year of nearly 100 students.

Nationally, the number of college students taking the Graduate Management Admissions Test has declined. In addition, the job market for new MBA graduates has become tougher as big companies have cut back.

Nevertheless, students continue to come to KU.

"I'm reading that stuff, too. For some reason, we seem to be immune to the virus," Collins said.

He said the latest placement report indicated 80 percent of KU students who earned an MBA from August 1993 to May 1994 found a job within six weeks of graduation.

Academic qualifications and work experience of the latest batch of MBA students was better this year, Collins said.

The 85 new master's candidates on the Lawrence campus had a slightly higher average GMAT score and grade-point average than students the previous year. They have 2.2 years of work experience, a bit above the average of 1.9 years.

At the Regents Center, this fall's class had 63 students. The average GMAT and GPA was comparable to that of students on the Lawrence campus, but Regents Center students had 5.9 years of work experience.

"This is a strong class," Collins said. "We intend to expand offerings there. We're catering to the Kansas City work force."

Commenting has been disabled for this item.