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Archive for Thursday, October 28, 1993

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LATE NITE NOTES
October 28, 1993
Some of Kansas’ basketball players have turned down starring roles in the annual Late Night With Roy Williams skit. Patrick Richey is not one of them. He enjoys grabbing the microphone and entertaining Jayhawk fans.
BAKER-ROSE
October 28, 1993
When it’s crunch time for Baker, Jimmie Rose has proven to be the Wildcats’ go-to man. Rose, a senior slotback, was named the NAIA player of the week for his outing against Evangel last Saturday. Rose had 227 total yards in a 51-13 trouncing of the 14-ranked Crusaders.
YOUNG SERVICES
October 28, 1993
Services for Velma Irene Young, 87, Lawrence, will be at 11 a.m. Monday at Rumsey Funeral Home with the Rev. William Dulin officiating. Graveside services and burial will be at 2 p.m. Monday in Mound City National Cemetery, Mound City.
TIRES, TIRES EVERYWHERE
October 28, 1993
But state health officials and a county commissioner disagree about its dangers.
DENTIST SINKS TEETH INTO RUSSIAN TOUR
October 28, 1993
A local dentist who visited Russian dental clinics says Russian dentists were curious about American dentists’ techniques, workload and salaries.
LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORT
October 28, 1993
Burglaries and thefts reported — Jewelry valued on a police report at $4,150 was taken between Oct. 8 and Oct. 11 from a residence in the 200 block of Arrowhead Drive, Lawrence police reported today. The owner, a 30-year-old woman, reported the theft Tuesday. Police said the woman had been in the hospital for several days recently, and discovered the theft when she returned home.
TONY SUPANCIC JR.
October 28, 1993
Services for former Lawrence resident Tony Supancic Jr., 83, will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at the Warren-McElwain Mortuary, Lawrence. Burial will be in Mount Calvary Cemetery, with Father Michael Scully officiating. Mr. Supancic died Wednesday, Oct. 27, 1993, at the Shawnee Gardens Nursing Home, Shawnee.
KU NOMINATES 7 FOR SCHOLARSHIPS
October 28, 1993
Seven current or former Kansas University students are nominees for prestigious scholarships.
JEROME SERVICES
October 28, 1993
Services for Lilas Alberta Jerome, 79, Lawrence, will be at 3 p.m. Saturday at Westside Presbyterian Church with the Rev. Robert Freitag officiating. Mrs. Jerome donated her body to science, and burial will be at a later date in Memorial Park Cemetery. Mrs. Jerome died Tuesday, Oct. 26, 1993, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
93 MILL LEVIES
October 28, 1993
To many Kansas residents, it’s nothing more than a confusing process that results in taxes. But to county administrators across the state, determining mill levies is a necessary process.
SOUND OFF
October 28, 1993
Q. How can Doug Compton be involved in city commission discussion about bars downtown when he has a financial interest in a bar over on Sixth Street? A. Compton, a city commissioner, is a former owner of the Yacht Club, 530 Wis. Two months ago he sold his 50 percent interest in the bar to Kelly Driscoll, then co-owner. Compton said Driscoll’s monthly payments would last for 10 years.
COUNTY SETS SEWER RATES
October 28, 1993
Douglas County commissioners approved sewer assessment rates Wednesday for property owners within Yankee Tank Sewer District No. 3. Property owners within the boundaries of district No. 3 will pay $1,145.45 an acre for the trunk main. The average assessment is $1,011.15 for property owners who have paid for another Yankee Tank district in the past but who will now join district No. 3. The assessment rates passed 2-0, with commissioner Mark Buhler abstaining.
DORIS STANKIEWIEZ
October 28, 1993
Services for Doris Nitzsche Stankiewiez, 63, Long Beach, Calif., will be at 3 p.m. Friday at Perry Christian Church, Perry, with the Rev. Dan Flory officiating. Memorial services and inurnment will be later in Long Beach, Calif. Mrs. Stankiewiez died Wednesday, Oct. 20, 1993, at a Long Beach hospital.
HOSPITAL REPORT
October 28, 1993
Dismissals Baby boy Vonderahe, Lawrence; Mildred Schomer, Baldwin; Dana Wermy, Lawrence; and Barbara Anderson, Lawrence.
LIGHTS TO FIGHT WINTER BLUES
October 28, 1993
Bert Nash Community Mental Health Center plans to brighten winter days for Lawrence residents who suffer from seasonal affective disorder.
PLANNERS AWAIT PUBLIC VERDICT
October 28, 1993
The latest step n the Horizon 2020 planning process is a list of land-use ideas, mailed to all 450 participants and asking for their opinions.
LHS NOTES
October 28, 1993
Every sporting event has its own little mini-dramas, and Friday’s Lawrence High-Leavenworth football game is no exception. While the Lions (8-0 overall, 2-0 in districts) and Pioneers (3-5, 2-0) are fighting for a trip to the state playoffs, an interesting little sub-plot will be shaping up on opposite sidelines.
LHS INJURY SIDEBAR
October 28, 1993
The Bermuda Triangle has moved. It has settled in somewhere between the Lawrence High football team’s defensive line and its secondary. “At linebacker, every name we’ve had up there has been injured,” LHS coach Dick Purdy said, glancing at the depth chart in his office. “We say we need a linebacker, and everybody runs. They don’t want to get hurt.”
T QUENCH RURAL WATER THIRST
October 28, 1993
Rural water issues trickle down to one issue for city and county officials
BRAIN
October 28, 1993
An 81-year-old Lawrence man says he was the doctor who performed the autopsy on physicist Albert Einstein in 1955. And for 38 years he’s been toting around parts of Einstein’s brain.
S HOOPS MEDIA DAY
October 28, 1993
Lawrence may have ranked only 265th in a recent list of North American cities by Places Rated Almanac, but Jennifer Trapp placed it No. 1 on her list. Trapp, a freshman on Kansas’ women’s basketball team, is a Lawrence High product who stayed in town. And it didn’t take her long to make up her mind.
VOLLEYBALL SUPPORT ROLE FITS PLUMLEE
October 28, 1993
Lawrence High’s volleyball team has six seniors. Five will start this weekend as the Lions try to win their fifth straight Class 6A title. The sixth, Heather Plumlee, will not start. She might not even make it into a game. But if you think her presence won’t be felt, think again.
ASHEIKI PRESTON
October 28, 1993
Glen Mason isn’t exactly raving about Asheiki Preston. Kansas’ offense has improved since Preston took over at quarterback four games ago, but Mason says it’s primarily because of better pass protection and improved wide-receiver play.
MASON RAD
October 28, 1993
Glen Mason doesn’t compose music and he doesn’t pen lyrics, yet the Kansas football coach did a nice job of singing the First Quarter Blues. “It’s amazing,” Mason said during his weekly media conference on Wednesday. “You take that first quarter out and we look a whole lot better.”
CORRECTION
October 28, 1993
An “On the Record” item in Oct. 20 Journal-World contained imprecise information. Only one defendant has settled with the plaintiff of a lawsuit filed in Douglas County District Court on Aug. 14, 1991. C.R. Bard Inc., Topeka, settled with Roy F. Sturtridge, Douglas County, for $7,500, lawyers involved in the case said Wednesday. The suit alleged that C.R. Bard manufactured faulty catheters that caused Sturtridge injury. Two other defendants, Dr. John B. Hiebert, Lawrence, and St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Topeka, refused to settle with the plaintiff, and one lawyer called the claim “spurious.”
Leach case investigator dismissed
October 28, 1993
The firing of a Leavenworth County deputy is the latest twist in the convoluted story of the 1988 disappearance of a Linwood teen-ager.
PLANNERS DELAY TARGET ACTION
October 28, 1993
The local planning commission will wait another month to look at plans for a Target department store on South Iowa Street.
S
October 28, 1993
Lawrence students may occasionally miss class because of their involvement in school organizations, but it’s a worthwhile trade-off, Lawrence school officials said today. They were responding to a Lawrence resident’s letter to the Journal-World criticizing the district for allowing students to miss class.
BRINGING POETIC RHYTHMS TO LIFE
October 28, 1993
Langston Hughes took the rhythms and movements of ordinary people and captured them in his poetry. Seemingly possessed by those same rhythms and movements, performance artist John S. Patterson has brought what he calls those “extraordinary” ordinary people to life.