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Archive for Tuesday, January 12, 1993

CONTRIBUTION FROM RICHEY HELPED OUT

January 12, 1993

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— Patrick Richey nearly covered the statistical spectrum on Monday night.

Rickey, a 6-foot-8 Kansas junior swingman, didn't attempt or make any free throws, but that was it.

Richey scored 14 points while playing 27 minutes both season highs in the Jayhawks' 96-85 win over Oklahoma.

"I think tonight," Richey said afterward, "I was able to contribute in several areas."

OK, let's check it out:

Six-of-seven from the field, including two-of-two from three-point range.

Four rebounds, three defensive and a stick-back on the offensive end.

One assist, one blocked shot and one steal.

Three turnovers and two fouls.

ALL IN ALL, who could argue with Richey's assessment of his performance? This was one time the Lee's Summit, Mo., product was worthy of a non-injury headline.

Usually when Richey is in the news it's because he's hurt, but not on Monday night. You can't ask for much more from a player coming off the bench.

In most cases, Richey spells Richard Scott, who has been foul prone. In the Oklahoma game, however, Scott stayed out of foul trouble, but Eric Pauley picked up his fourth early in the second half.

"One good thing about Kansas," Richey said. "If someone gets in foul trouble, we're not in trouble."

Richey had been averaging 17 minutes a game. On Monday, he spent only four minutes of the second half on the bench.

"One time in the second half I could hardly stand up," Richey said. "I think it was right before a TV timeout. I was sucking air big time."

Richey, who had played 11 minutes of the first half, was rarin' to go in the second half after coach Roy Williams challenged the Jayhawks to quit pussy-footing.

"HE (WILLIAMS) had to get wild and crazy on us," Richey said. "We were playing stupid. Then we started executing and things fell in place."

That was the good news. The bad news was the Jayhawks flew back to Lawrence after the game so they could begin spring semester classes today.

Most of them had 9:30 a.m. classes, but guard Steve Woodberry had an 8:30 class.

"I like to get mine over with," he said.

Then there was soph center Greg Ostertag. His first class wasn't until 1 p.m., he said, putting his palms together and resting them under his nodded head.

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