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Archive for Wednesday, September 23, 1992

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PETITION SHORT IN FILING EFFORT
September 23, 1992
The first bid for a 1993 Lawrence City Commission seat hit a snag this week when the intended candidate’s petition to enter the race fell one name short of having enough valid signatures. Fred Markham, a candidate in the 1991 commission election and an advocate for people with disabilities, submitted a petition Friday with more than 60 names, according to the city clerk’s office.
DISTRICT IMPLEMENTS DISCIPLINARY MEASURES
September 23, 1992
Unruly or unprepared students at Wellsville Elementary School could find themselves behind a desk on Saturdays through a new detention and study skills enhancement program. Gwen Boone, school board clerk, said fifth- and sixth-graders will receive a 20-minute detention after school if they are reprimanded three times during one class rotation for excessive talking, disrupting the class, disrespect or mischief. Students in sixth grade also will get an automatic detention if they are late for class more than six times in a nine-week period, fail to complete their daily classwork or come to class without the necessary materials.
TRAFFIC CONTROL READY FOR RARE NIGHT GAME
September 23, 1992
Although Kansas University’s home football game Thursday against California will be only the second night game at Memorial Stadium, traffic control will be no different from that of any Saturday afternoon game, police say. “It’s going to be the same game plan as if it were a Saturday afternoon, except it will be in the dark instead of the daytime,” Lawrence police Sgt. Mark Warren said.
S ACCOUNTS UNCLEAR
September 23, 1992
Last month’s bankruptcy filing by Homestead Land Title Co. has turned into a legal can of worms, and attorneys watching the case say they aren’t certain what it all means for the company’s escrow clients. Topeka-based Homestead, which until last month had an office at 1035 Vt., filed Aug. 28 to reorganize its finances under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. Although the company stopped selling title insurance last month, it’s still operating an escrow agency that serves an undetermined number of Lawrence customers.
CARL B. AMYX
September 23, 1992
Services for Carl B. Amyx, 75, Lawrence, will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at Warren-McElwain Mortuary with the Rev. Dennis Chadwick officiating. Burial will be in Memorial Park Cemetery. Lawrence Lodge No. 6 A.F. & A.M. will conduct Masonic graveside services. Mr. Amyx died Wednesday, Sept. 23, 1992, from complications of myelofibrosis at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
DANIEL J. MCALISTER
September 23, 1992
Memorial services for Daniel “Dan” James McAlister Jr., 54, Lawrence, will be at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at the First Presbyterian Church here. Mr. McAlister, a Lawrence police officer, died Tuesday, Sept. 22, 1992, of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.
KU PANEL STRESSES CULTURAL DIVERSITY
September 23, 1992
People of different backgrounds and beliefs should learn to respect one another as equal members of society to facilitate the concept of multiculturalism and eliminate discrimination, members of a panel said Tuesday at Kansas University. In a wide-ranging discussion, a 10-member panel of KU students, faculty and staff discussed with an audience the concept of multiculturalism and ways in which people could live together better.
KIMBRELLS SUE ADIA OVER COMPANY SALE
September 23, 1992
W. David Kimbrell, the Lawrence entrepreneur who co-founded Hall-Kimbrell Environmental Services Inc., and his wife, Janet, have sued ADIA S.A., a Swiss corporation, seeking $11 million in damages and other relief. In the lawsuit, which was filed in U.S. District Court at Topeka, the Kimbrells claim they were defrauded when they sold stock in their company to Professional Services Inc., a Lombard, Ill., company owned by ADIA, in January 1990.
DETENTION CENTER PANEL SEEKS WAYS TO SLICE BUDGET
September 23, 1992
A subcommittee of the Northeast Kansas Regional Juvenile Detention Center on Tuesday studied the center’s budget to think of ways to cut costs at the center, proposed for North Lawrence. Pam Weigand, detention center director, said the group developed a list of possible cost-cutting measures for her to research. The group determined it needed to cut its operating budget after Leavenworth County decided to build its own center. Leavenworth’s move will cost the regional group $43,886 in 1993 and $140,986 in 1994.
FOR THE RECORD
September 23, 1992
Law enforcement report Police reports
SCHOOLS EARN HIGH GRADE IN SURVEY
September 23, 1992
A national business magazine says Lawrence’s school system is a good reason for expanding companies to move to this community, but a Lawrence school board member says the evaluation does not look at a critical factor: the district’s facilities. The Lawrence school district was among 500 districts evaluated in the current issue of Expansion Management magazine. The magazine’s Education Quotient (EQ) index gave the Lawrence district 132.8 points out of a possible 150 points.
HOSPITAL REPORT
September 23, 1992
DISMISSALS Kathleen Hess and baby girl, Lawrence; Ann Margaret Katzenmeier and baby girl, Eudora.
LATE-BLOOMER HESS IMPRESSIVE IN COLORADO
September 23, 1992
Lightning was crackling and hail falling as John Hess approached the 18th green last Sunday at the Falcon Invitational in Colorado Springs, Colo. The Kansas junior golfer from Leawood had left himself an eight-foot putt for birdie and a chance at a sparkling round of 68. He had a lot of time to think about the medium-distance putt while sitting in the clubhouse waiting out a short rain delay.
VACCINATIONS AGAINST FLU AVAILABLE SOON
September 23, 1992
The Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department during October will administer flu vaccine at six sites in the county. The special vaccination program is targeted for people at increased risk for influenza-related complications and those people potentially capable of transmitting flu to high-risk persons.
SPEAKER ADVOCATES PRO-LIFE FEMINISM
September 23, 1992
Pro-life feminist Juli Loesch-Wiley says her politics don’t constitute an oxymoron. After all, she said Tuesday at Kansas University, traditional feminist philosophy referred to abortion as an atrocity.
KU MAY PROPOSE RAISING TUITION TO BOOST SALARIES
September 23, 1992
A special tuition hike might be one method of bringing Kansas University faculty salaries in line with wages at peer universities, Chancellor Gene Budig said today. “The university has an inescapable obligation to work with its constituencies in addressing the critical problem of faculty salaries,” Budig said.
QUESTIONS RAISED OVER TICKET DEVICE
September 23, 1992
City officials are grading the performance of the city’s new computerized parking ticket system, which apparently did not ace its first test. Assistant City Manager Rod Bremby said Tuesday that some questions remain about the reliability of Cardinal Tracking Inc., the vendor of the system and its accessories.
CAL-KANSAS GAME IS AN OPPORTUNITY FOR ESPNALSO
September 23, 1992
It’s no threat to unseat the season premiere of Murphy Brown atop this week’s ratings, but ESPN’s telecast of the Cal-Kansas game won’t be a bad show. “I’ll be honest. We’re real excited about this game,” said Fred Gaudelli, ESPN’s producer for the game. “We’re getting Kansas experiencing the greatest upswing in football in a long, long time. In Cal, we’ve got a quality program. Plus we get Russell White, who’s a Heisman Trophy candidate.
S ROLE FOR CHILDREN FACING COURT SYSTEM
September 23, 1992
The fear that some children will “slip through the cracks” is one reason why CASA Douglas County’s Court Appointed Special Advocates Inc. exists in Douglas County. The Douglas County organization was started in spring 1991 because the number of child abuse and juvenile cases was growing at an alarming rate, said Laura Barter, staff supervisor and certified volunteer for CASA.
CITY TO SEEK GRANTS FOR HOUSING
September 23, 1992
Lawrence city commissioners gave their approval Tuesday to two requests for $600,000 in state funds to help provide shelter for people with homes going to pot or no homes at all. One application asks for $300,000 from the state’s Department of Commerce and Housing to help pay the rents of very low-income families, much like the federal Section 8 housing assistance program.
CHANCES IN BIG EIGHT
September 23, 1992
Kansas’ appeared in the Associated Press college football rankings at No. 24 this week, but they’re in Keith Gilbertson’s Top 10. “Kansas right now might be the best team in the country,” said Gilbertson, the first-year head coach at California. “Obviously, they’re one of the hottest.”
BOY CRITICALLY INJURED IN FIRE
September 23, 1992
A fire early today in a southwest Lawrence mobile home left a young Lawrence boy in critical condition at a Kansas City hospital and sent a firefighter to Lawrence Memorial Hospital with a dislocated ankle. Mark Fox, the injured boy, suffered severe smoke inhalation and minor burns in the blaze at the mobile home, on Lot H30 in Gaslight Village, 1900 W. 31st.
GASOLINE TAX TO HELP FUEL TRAIL FUNDING
September 23, 1992
Lawrence city commissioners approved a measure Tuesday that could fuel city biking and hiking trail funding as residents fill up their gasoline tanks. Commissioners adopted a special ordinance on first reading that would allow the city to use 10 percent of its state gasoline tax funds to pay for footpaths and bicycle trails.
-SUCCESSFUL MISSION
September 23, 1992
A pair of reports in Tuesday’s Journal-World shows that Kansas University continues to reach for excellence both for its students and faculty. KU advanced this year in U.S. News and World Report’s listing of “America’s Best Colleges.” Although the university hasn’t broken into the magazine’s top 51 it moved up a notch to the list’s “second quartile” of 51 schools, putting it in the top half of the ranking.
AREA DISTRICTS SEE SCHOOL MILL LEVIES DROP
September 23, 1992
Mill levies in Lawrence-area school districts will drop drastically this year as a result of new school financing legislation designed to provide property tax relief. In May, Gov. Joan Finney signed into law two companion finance bills. The new laws established a uniform statewide property tax levy of 32 mills, or $288 for a home appraised at $75,000, for the 1992 tax year. A mill equals $1 in taxes for every $1,000 in assessed valuation.
UH, COACH, WHAT DAY IS IT?
September 23, 1992
Three times Glen Mason stated emphatically that it was Wednesday. Twice the media let the mistake slip by. Not a third time, though. “Uh, coach,” someone pointed out during the Kansas football coach’s Tuesday media conference, “today is Tuesday.”
4 SUSPECTS IN ROBBERY ARRESTED
September 23, 1992
Franklin County sheriff’s officers arrested four people after an armed robbery Tuesday evening and a chase that ended in Osage County. The Country Inn Restaurant, located south of Wellsville on Interstate 35 at the LeLoup interchange, was robbed at 7:46 p.m. Tuesday by two men, and one was armed with a handgun, a news release from the sheriff’s office said. An undetermined amount of money was taken, and a clerk at the restaurant suffered minor injuries when one of the robbers struck her with the gun. No shots were fired, authorities said.
10 JUNIOR HIGH STUDENTS HEAD TO D.C. FOR EDUCATIONAL TOUR
September 23, 1992
A trip Sharon Goolsby took with some Lawrence High School students in the early 1970s changed her life. “That trip to the South was a turning point in my life as far as being an African-American child,” Goolsby said today. “It made me realize that I could be anything I wanted to be.”
KEMPF HAS SWIMMERS PRACTICING AT LONE STAR LAKE
September 23, 1992
Sunbathers at Lone Star Lake have doubled as spectators this summer. They’ve watched with curiosity as Gary Kempf’s Kansas University swimmers practice outdoors.
93
September 23, 1992
Twenty Lawrence area residents have been selected for the 1993 Class of Leadership Lawrence. The class will focus on all aspects of the community and will stress individual responsibility for participation and leadership at the local level.
JONES HEARING THURSDAY
September 23, 1992
By day, Bill Jones plays football for the Kansas City Chiefs. By night, he’s an inmate at KC’s Municipal Correctional Institute.
ISSUES
September 23, 1992
Children and family issues served as the focal point Tuesday night for a political forum that featured eight local candidates for the Kansas Legislature. Attending the forum were Sandy Praeger, R-Lawrence, and Joyce Wolf, D-Lawrence, both running for the 2nd District Senate seat; Barbara Ballard, D-Lawrence, and Brian Kubota, R-Lawrence, both running for the 44th District House seat; Forrest Swall, D-Lawrence, a candidate for the 45th House District; and Betty Jo Charlton, D-Lawrence, the incumbent in the 46th House District along with two of her challengers, Neva Entrikin, R-Lawrence, and Dick Small, a Lawrence Independent.
REFUGE GETS GREEN LIGHT FOR CHARGES
September 23, 1992
A wildlife refuge in Jefferson County would be allowed to charge money from visiting groups under certain conditions recommended by the county planning commission. The Jefferson County Planning and Zoning Commission recommended approval of a conditional use permit for 120.18 acres owned by the Wilderness Community Education Foundation, a non-profit group based in the county. The permit would allow the foundation to charge a fee to groups who wanted to use the land for education or recreation.
AUTHOR RECALLS FLINT HILLS
September 23, 1992
It’s been a year since William Least Heat-Moon returned to Chase County, Kan., the subject of his 600-page best-seller “PrairyErth.” But on his current swing through Kansas, which included a book signing Tuesday night at The Raven Bookstore, 8 E. Seventh, he finally got back to Cottonwood Falls, the Chase County seat. And he liked what he saw.