Archive for Thursday, September 17, 1992

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September 17, 1992
To the editor: A pet cat’s “right” to wander stops at the perimeter of its owner’s property. The world is full of risks, among them parasites, poisoning, cat haters, unwanted breeding, other animals, foul weather, diseases, traffic and traps. The Lawrence Humane Society folks grow heartsick trying to save sick and injured pets whose owners feel animal control measures need not apply to them because their pets need to be free. This fallacy costs us tax dollars. Today, it also cost one feline accident victim a leg.
PLAYERS APPRECIATED
September 17, 1992
To the editor: As the Seem-To-Be Players prepare to celebrate their 20th birthday, I am amazed at the number of families who are unaware of the high quality children’s theater that this non-profit group has been providing to this community for so long.
MAN FILES SUIT AGAINST EATERY
September 17, 1992
A Johnson County man has filed suit against the owner of a local fast food restaurant and against a security company over an alleged fight at the restaurant in 1990. Tige Lamb, age not listed, filed his suit in Douglas County District Court against A and K Enterprises Inc., Lawrence, which owns and operates Burger King, 1301 W. 23rd, and Lawrence Security Inc., which provided security for the restaurant. Lamb asserts that he suffered cuts and bruises to his face and back from an assault he suffered by several unknown people while he was a customer in the restaurant on Oct. 27, 1990.
EARLY MORNING STORM TRIGGERS HOUSE FIRE
September 17, 1992
Spewing heavy rains, lightning and thunder through Lawrence this morning, a roaring thunderstorm more than doubled the city’s rainfall for this month and caused a house fire about six miles south of town. Douglas County sheriff’s officers reported that at about 4:35 a.m. today, lightning struck the home of Robert and Pat Nelson, Rt. 2, setting the house on fire.
ALBERTA BAUGH
September 17, 1992
Services for Alberta Delores Baugh, 78, Tonganoxie, will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at Tonganoxie Christian Church with the Rev. Ben Saathoff officiating. Burial will be at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens in Kansas City, Kan. Mrs. Baugh died Thursday, Sept. 17, 1992, at Trinity Lutheran Hospital in Kansas City, Mo.
JACK DEAN ARMSTRONG
September 17, 1992
Graveside services with full military honors for Jack Dean Armstrong, 64, Baldwin, will be at 11 a.m. Monday at Prairie City Cemetery in Baldwin. He died Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1992, at Colmery O’Neil V.A. Medical Center in Topeka.
STATE SALARIES, HEALTH CARE IN FOCUS AT LOCAL FORUM
September 17, 1992
Seven Kansas House and four Kansas Senate candidates appearing Wednesday in a campaign forum at Kansas University agreed that state employees are underpaid. Although there was consensus on that point, the candidates didn’t agree on where to place blame for the paycheck shortfall.
GOTTFRIED TO WORK KU GAME
September 17, 1992
Early on, it looked like Mike Gottfried would be working two of his former schools Pittsburgh and Kansas on back-to-back Thursdays on ESPN. Gottfried, now in his third year as a college football analyst for the cable network, will not work tonight’s Pitt-Rutgers game, however. He will be in Lawrence for next Thursday’s Cal-Kansas contest, though.
JOSEPH KIELTYKA SR.
September 17, 1992
Services for Joseph J. Kieltyka Sr., 76, Lenexa, will be 1 p.m. Friday at Holy Trinity Catholic Church in Lenexa. Burial will be in Antioch Cemetery. Mr. Kieltyka died Wednesday, Sept. 16, 1992, at Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kan.
JUNIOR COLLEGE FUNDING PLAN UNVEILED
September 17, 1992
Education officials and lawmakers have begun discussions of a proposal to “regionalize” the state’s community colleges, a plan that envisions levying property taxes in all counties to support the two-year schools. Education Commissioner Lee Droegemueller said Wednesday that the proposal is in response to the growth of enrollments at the state’s 19 community colleges. He presented the proposal to the Legislative Educational Planning Committee and to the Joint Commission on Governance.
HASKELL ENROLLMENT HITS 10-YEAR PEAK
September 17, 1992
Haskell Indian Junior College is reporting its highest enrollment in 10 years this fall semester with 906 students. Of that 906, 880 attend class at the campus in Lawrence and 26 others attend extension classes in Mayetta, Powhattan, and off campus in Lawrence, said Hannes Combest, education assistant to Haskell President Bob Martin.
CONCERT TO BENEFIT JAZZ DOCUMENTARY SET
September 17, 1992
A benefit concert for a documentary on the history of Kansas City jazz will be at 8 p.m. Friday at Liberty Hall, 642 Mass. Queen Bey, Claude “Fiddler” Williams, Joe Cartwright and Chuck and Nathan Berg are scheduled to perform, said Sean Saffold, producer of the project.
E. PARKWAY HAS FRIENDS IN CONGRESS
September 17, 1992
Members of Kansas’ congressional delegation are making good on their promises to try to flush out federal funds for the Eastern Parkway. Rep. Jan Meyers, R-Kan., shot off 20 faxes this week to members of a House-Senate conference committee who soon will meet to hash over a federal transportation bill.
BLOTTER
September 17, 1992
Fire calls Lawrence firefighters:
3-DIMENSIONAL MODEL TO HELP ARCHITECTS PLAN FOR NEW HOCH
September 17, 1992
Architects have constructed a three-dimensional model of Kansas University’s fire-ravaged Hoch Auditorium that will be used in the design phase of its rebuilding. Dale Glenn, an architect with PKG Design Group of Lawrence and lead architect in the rebuilding of Hoch, said architects and KU’s Hoch Auditorium Construction Committee have discussed a few conceptual ideas of what the new structure should look like.
DARK-SUITED CLASS ATYPICAL STUDENTS
September 17, 1992
If there’s such a thing as a typical Kansas University student, the 35 members of a class meeting at Adams Alumni Center this week wouldn’t fit the description. The dark suits are a tipoff. So are the aviator-style sunglasses. And then there are the recent-model four-door American-made sedans they drive to class.
JAYHAWKS SAY PUB PREMATURE
September 17, 1992
Anyone who read Tuesday’s USA Today couldn’t help but think the national newspaper was in love with the Kansas football team. Just inches away from a headline that described the Jayhawks as an “offensive juggernaut” were the USA Today weekly power ratings. Kansas, which has yet to crash a national poll, was ranked seventh on the USA Today power chart behind Miami, Oklahoma, Washington, Nebraska, Michigan and Florida State.
WAKARUSA VALLEY SCHOOL RECEIVES INTERIM PRINCIPAL
September 17, 1992
Linda Rogers, a former elementary school principal who moved to Lawrence this year to teach fourth grade, has been named interim principal at Wakarusa Valley School. Rogers is taking the post of former Wakarusa Valley Principal Ernie Coleman, who died Sept. 2. Rogers was selected with the help of a teachers’ committee at the school. Lawrence schools Supt. Al Azinger said a full search for a permanent principal will be conducted in the spring.
HOSPITAL REPORT
September 17, 1992
DISMISSALS Teri Johnston and baby boy, Eudora.
POLICE FORCE NEARS FULL STRENGTH
September 17, 1992
A police officer walks by you while you’re shopping in downtown Lawrence. Later, you see two more officers on bicycles. And on the way home, you see another officer running a radar gun on a side street. You start to feel as if police officers are everywhere. And compared with this time in 1990, you’re right.
HURRICANE DORMANT SO FAR
September 17, 1992
A panel of coaches agreed unanimously that Tulsa’s offense needs little more than time to start producing. Kansas coach Glen Mason and TU coach Dave Rader sat on the panel. Their teams meet Saturday with 6 p.m. kickoff at Skelly Stadium on the TU campus.
SCHOOLS SHUFFLE CLASSES AMID CONSTRUCTION DELAYS
September 17, 1992
Construction delays in two Lawrence-area school districts have caused frustration for students and school officials. Builders in both Oskaloosa and Perry-Lecompton had planned to finish their projects in time for the start of school, but didn’t meet that goal. Conversion of the old Oskaloosa High School industrial arts building into science and music rooms has fallen about a month behind schedule, school board members were told this week.
CAUSE FOR PAWS
September 17, 1992
Larry and Margaret Hopkins are harboring a juvenile offender. A wild child with a checkered past and possible gang ties seized by officers early this month. As they await a court appearance, the Hopkinses let him wander outside their northwest Lawrence home and play with neighborhood children. Daily, he commits the same crime for which officers picked him up early this month.
STUDENTS SAY PROF MADE ADVANCES
September 17, 1992
A hearing on a recommendation to fire a Kansas University law professor went into its fourth week today as two former law students testified that the professor made unwelcome advances toward them. A December 1991 law school graduate testified that, in a statement she gave to the university in September 1991, she said professor Emil Tonkovich approached her in the law school and asked “whether I would like to take a ride with him and see land he owned.”
CORRECTION
September 17, 1992
A photo caption in Monday’s Journal-World incorrectly said that Margaret and Larry Hopkins have been fined by the city several times for allowing their cat to roam at large. The city has ticketed the couple once.
READY FOR TEST
September 17, 1992
Bill Murr knows tractor pulling. The rural McLouth businessman and farmer first entered a tractor pull in the mid-1960s, after he graduated from high school. Back then, he competed with his farm tractor at area county fairs.
COUNTY OKS EXPANSION OF QUARRY
September 17, 1992
Douglas County commissioners on Wednesday gave their stamp of approval to plans to increase the size of a limestone quarry near the Shawnee-Douglas county line. Commissioners OK’d Martin Marietta Aggregates’ request to add 80 acres to its quarry site along both sides of County Road 442 northwest of Stull. Only 18 acres of the 80 acres will be used because of setbacks required on the tract.
OFFENSE SLUGGISH, BUT D PUTS LIONS IN CHASE FOR TITLE
September 17, 1992
So much for Lawrence High’s grind-it-out, ball-control football offense. The loss of big-play running backs Michael Cosey and Adam Green and Lawrence’s unusual size across the offensive line this year made the Lions look like, and adopt a game plan suited to, a short-gain power team.
UNFAIR ELECTION POLICY
September 17, 1992
The Kansas Legislature should even the playing field for state employees who choose to run for state office. Sen. Wint Winter, R-Lawrence, has announced plans to research and possibly correct a law that now requires classified state employees to quit their jobs before running for office while unclassified employees can continue working while seeking election and take a leave of absence to serve in the Legislature.
LIONS, SM SOUTH TOUGH DEFENSIVELY
September 17, 1992
For what it’s worth, against the common foe of Olathe North, Lawrence scored three points and Shawnee Mission South scored two. The Lions allowed zero points, and the Raiders allowed three.
KU, HASKELL STUDENTS SEEK CLOSER TIES
September 17, 1992
Although the campuses are separated by only a few miles, Kansas University and Haskell Indian Junior College students have often seemed to live in different worlds. But steps were taken Wednesday to bridge the gap between those worlds as members of Haskell’s student senate met with leaders of the KU student senate.
KU SEEKS FUNDING FOR LANDFILL CLEANUP
September 17, 1992
Kansas University officials today said they need $2.6 million from the state to pay for cleanup at a DeSoto area landfill used by KU for nearly 20 years to dispose of low-level radioactive waste. The Sunflower Research Landfill doesn’t pose a health threat, said James Modig, KU’s director of facilities planning. However, the cleaning project will prevent future groundwater contamination from chemicals buried at the dump.