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Archive for Wednesday, September 2, 1992

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APPOINTMENT OPPORTUNITY
September 2, 1992
Strong appointments have not been a hallmark of Gov. Joan Finney’s administration. The governor, however, now has an opportunity to redeem herself with her choice of a replacement for Justice Harold S. Herd on the Kansas Supreme Court.
FOR THE RECORD
September 2, 1992
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
HE MADE KC ROSTER
September 2, 1992
Ignored by all 28 teams in the NFL draft, Doug Terry has made the 47-man roster of the Kansas City Chiefs. “I’m overjoyed. This is right up there with anything I’ve accomplished. It’s really exciting,” Terry, a free agent free safety from Kansas University said Tuesday.
SHELTER TO BE OPEN SEVEN DAYSWEEK
September 2, 1992
The Lawrence Salvation Army’s shelter will open its doors seven nights a week to the homeless beginning in mid-October. “We’re planning on no later than Oct. 15 on opening,” Jim McDonald, shelter director, said this morning.
TURN LANE
September 2, 1992
Drivers traveling in the outside lane on Ninth Street may find themselves turning a little red when they reach Mississippi Street. That’s because new lane arrows painted at the intersection indicate those in the outside lane must turn right.
CITY TO SEEK PROPOSALS FOR GOLF STUDY
September 2, 1992
Lawrence city commissioners decided to put the word out Tuesday that they are interested in updating a study on the feasibility of a city-owned golf course. “I think it would be helpful to us to learn what the current status of the course is,” said Mayor Bob Schulte.
DOLE PLEDGES HELP WITH PARKWAY
September 2, 1992
Lawrence city commissioners are wasting no time in using their newly allowed ability to meet in pairs to discuss city business without notifying the public. Mayor Bob Schulte and Commissioner Bob Schumm attended a hastily called conference Sunday afternoon at the Lawrence Municipal Airport between city, county and Lawrence Chamber of Commerce officials and Sen. Bob Dole, R-Kan. In the meeting, Dole pledged to try to dig up $8.2 million in federal transportation funds for the Eastern Parkway, Schulte said Tuesday during the city commission’s weekly meeting.
COOLER MONTHS PROVIDE MIXTURE OF GOOD AND BAD
September 2, 1992
Kansas weather, never known for consistency, went particularly haywire this summer. Usually dry, hot months, July and August went on record as wet and cool, and whether the strange summer weather is good or bad depends on who’s asked. Farmers are raving that the corn crop could be the best in years as a result of the rain, but hot, sunny skies are needed now to bring corn, milo and soybeans to maturity and curb diseases. The developmental delay is prompting concern the fall-harvested crop may become vulnerable to a killing frost.
KISH BEATS DRUM FOR KU FOOTBALL
September 2, 1992
As special assistant to the athletic director, Bernie Kish operates out of an office in KU’s Parrott Athletic Center. He doesn’t spend his most productive hours sitting behind a desk, however.
WAKARUSA VALLEY PRINCIPAL, 55, DIES AFTER COLLAPSING
September 2, 1992
Ernest J. Coleman, principal at Wakarusa Valley School for the last seven years, died this morning at the age of 55. Coleman collapsed as he was meeting school buses arriving at Wakarusa Valley early this morning and died a short time later. The cause of death had not been determined when this report went to press.
TESTIMONY CONNECTS GUN TO 2 SUSPECTS IN MURDER
September 2, 1992
A key prosecution witness in a case against two men accused of killing a 23-year-old man in late July testified during a preliminary hearing today that he helped the defendants bury a gun police believe was used in the slaying. Johnny Holloway testified in Douglas County District Court that after they buried the gun, he also heard both defendants talk about killing Jeffrey Len Holly, 24, early July 29 on a southeast Lawrence street.
COMMISSION ENDORSES TAXI VOUCHER PLAN
September 2, 1992
Lawrence city commissioners endorsed a proposal Tuesday that would supply low-cost taxi coupons to local residents beginning in 1994. Under the proposal, elderly, disabled or low-income residents could buy $3 coupons from the city for 25 cents to help pay for cab rides. The general public could buy $1 vouchers for a quarter.
AYCOCK USES THREE-POINTER
September 2, 1992
One of Kansas’ women’s basketball players may have found a new weapon. Out of necessity, sophomore Angela Aycock rediscovered the three-point shot during the Junior World qualifying tournament in Guanajuato, Mexico.
STUDENTS IN SCIENCE CLASSES
September 2, 1992
It’s not easy for Wellsville Elementary School youngsters to pass fifth grade without a love of science. The fifth-grade science teacher, Marilyn Poor, sees to it. Poor recently was named one of three elementary science teachers in the state to receive a Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Teaching.
HOSPITAL REPORT
September 2, 1992
DISMISSALS Colleen Pederson and baby girl, Lawrence.
SHARON DICKINSON
September 2, 1992
Lawrence school support staff were working this morning to develop a plan for helping children cope with the sudden death of Wakarusa Valley School Principal Ernest Coleman. “We have brought in counselors and social workers and psychologists,” Supt. Al Azinger said. “They’re working with students to help them deal with the difficulty of the news.”
MEYERS DISCUSSES BUDGET AT HASKELL
September 2, 1992
Although politicians can be members of several exclusive clubs, Congresswoman Jan Meyers, R-Kan., can claim membership where few others can. Meyers was made a member of the Haskell Indian Junior College’s football team on Tuesday during her first official visit to the campus.
CITY FAILS TO SETTLE SPRINKLER SYSTEM DEBATE
September 2, 1992
Lawrence city commissioners tried to clear up a months-long quagmire between a city board and lawn sprinkler installers Tuesday, but bogged down themselves in a two-hour debate. In the end, nothing had changed, and the issue was deferred indefinitely.
LONGTIME FRIENDS RUEL, PETTIBONE TO MEET SATURDAY
September 2, 1992
Truth be known, one of Oregon State’s assistants is partly responsible for putting Golden Pat Ruel and Jerry Pettibone on opposite sidelines Saturday. Pettibone was still the head coach at Northern Illinois when Ruel, his offensive coordinator, pulled up stakes to join Glen Mason’s new staff at Kansas.
T BACK NEW CENTER
September 2, 1992
Douglas County and a sampling of counties in northeast Kansas remain committed to building a regional juvenile detention center in Lawrence despite Leavenworth County’s plan to build a center of its own. Leavenworth County Commissioners announced that they will apply for a state license to build a detention center in Leavenworth. The announcement removes Leavenworth County from participation in the regional center, in which it was the second largest county.
TITLE INSURANCE FIRM IS CHARGED
September 2, 1992
A title insurance and escrow agency that last week closed its Lawrence office and filed bankruptcy must answer charges that it failed to remit about $65,000 in premiums to an underwriting company, which would be a felony under Kansas law. The Kansas Insurance Commissioner’s office has scheduled a hearing Sept. 21 in Topeka for Homestead Land Title Co., which until Friday had an office at 1035 Vt. In a letter Tuesday to David Marker, Homestead’s president, Insurance Commissioner Ron Todd said his department is investigating allegations that the company collected about $65,000 in premiums that it did not forward to First American Title Insurance Co. of New York.
LOCAL WOMAN A HIT ON BROADWAY
September 2, 1992
Jane Bodle admits she’s the last person you’d think would land a job as a principal performer in a hit Broadway musical. She confesses to growing up, well, shy. But Bodle, a Lawrence native, now appears on Broadway as Ellen, the wife of a husband who rejects a Vietnamese mistress, in the musical hit “Miss Saigon.” She says she got there through sheer stubborness.
JAYHAWK A REAL CROWD-PLEASER
September 2, 1992
As Jayhawk sports fans anticipate the start of another year, Kansas University officials look forward to the financial rewards brought on by the school’s mascot. “The only thing I ever hear is good things about it,” said Mike Reid, licensing manager for the university. “I’ve heard people from around the country say they wish they had a mascot like ours.”