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Archive for Sunday, May 10, 1992

Also from May 10

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May 10, 1992
It takes a lot of work to lie in bed for two hours. At least it does under special circumstances, such as the ones Vicki Oleson now faces. Oleson plays a quadriplegic in “Whose Life is It Anyway?”, and for the duration of the drama she must lie immobile in a bed and convince the audience that the best thing for her character is to be left to die.
NEIGHBORHOODS
May 10, 1992
A map of Lawrence neighborhoods resembles a sort of crazy quilt with oddly shaped patches of communities comprising the fabric of the city. And like the quilt patches, each neighborhood is unique in its texture and character, atmosphere and tax bracket.
PERSONNEL FIRM
May 10, 1992
Shirley Martin-Smith hasn’t forgotten what it’s like to be a regular wage slave. Martin-Smith, president of Martin-Smith Personnel Inc., learned her business from the bottom up. She started out as a temporary office worker who was farmed out to various employers for short-term assignments, and eventually she managed the local office of a temporary placement firm.
APPROPRIATE ARTICLE
May 10, 1992
To the editor: What a pleasant surprise it was to find an article in the Home Week section dedicated not to the new $200,000 homes in Lawrence but to fair housing and to the local Habitat for Humanity program.
THANKS TO WINTER
May 10, 1992
To the editor: Last week, State Sen. Wint Winter Jr. of Lawrence announced that he would not seek another term in the Kansas Senate. Sen. Winter has shown an uncanny ability to quickly grasp the substantive issues and manage the complicated legislative process. As a result, citizens of Douglas County, the city of Lawrence and Kansas Unviersity have been well-served during his 10-year tenure. In addition, Winter, as chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, took on numerous important statewide issues, many of them controversial, and often led the way for his legislative colleagues.
EMPLOYEE GROUP PLANTS 200 TREES
May 10, 1992
About 18 Holidome employees planted 200 trees Saturday at an old landfill near Midland Junction, the intersection of U.S. Highway 24 and Douglas County Road 1045. Liz Linss, chair of the Holidome employee group that participated in the tree planting, said the event originally was planned in conjunction with the local chapter of Big Brothers Big Sisters of America. However, no one from that group showed up at the event so the trees were planted solely by Holidome employees. Linss said she thought BBBSA was involved in another activity Saturday.
FOR THE RECORD
May 10, 1992
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
BULGARIANS LOOK TO CITY FOR PEN PALS
May 10, 1992
Some Bulgarian students are looking for a few good pen pals. Cody Ochs, a Lawrence resident who taught English in Bulgaria last year, is trying to find local pen pals for some students he worked with in the East European country.
MUSIC FESTIVAL RUNS SMOOTHLY
May 10, 1992
There were no problems reported late Saturday night involving a music festival east of Eudora, Douglas County Sheriff Loren Anderson said. “I’ve heard they had a good crowd with no problem so far. I just checked,” Anderson said about 10:20 p.m. Saturday.
DUAL PASSIONS LEAD TO MARINA BUSINESS
May 10, 1992
A Lawrence restaurant owner has turned his love of water sports and the outdoors into a business by taking over as marina operator at Lone Star Lake. “I own a restaurant, so I understand food service. I own a boat, and I’ve always liked the water,” said Bob Laskey, who also owns the Pizza Shoppe and Pub.
BLUEDTOLICE PLAN TO HONOR OFFICERS KILLED IN DUTY
May 10, 1992
Lawrence police are asking motorists to display blue ribbons on their cars throughout the month of May in honor of law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty. It’s all part of Project Blue Ribbon, which is sponsored by the national Fraternal Order of Police.
SCHOOL BOARD TO CONSIDER NEW PROGRAMS
May 10, 1992
Now that the Kansas Legislature has given the Lawrence school board an indication of the funding the district will receive in 1992-93, the board is in a good position to discuss what new programs it might want to implement next school year. The board will do just that when it meets at 7:30 p.m. Monday at the district’s Service Center, 3705 Clinton Pkwy.
DOWNTOWN OPTIONS PUT NEIGHBORHOODS ON EDGE
May 10, 1992
The leaders of neighborhoods near downtown are keeping an eye peeled on the Lawrence City Commission as it concocts a plan to keep downtown businesses healthy and encourage growth. In the worst scenario, residents foresee downtown boundaries expanding and neighborhood homes or properties bulldozed to make way for new developments.
TRAFFIC ISSUES TOP LIST
May 10, 1992
Scratch the surface of most Lawrence neighborhood associations, and underneath you will find residents itching about local traffic. Some residents fear an increase in traffic on their streets. Others say traffic moves too fast. Others find there isn’t enough parking. For certain, local traffic gives residents a headache.
BRUSH WITH MOTHER NATURE
May 10, 1992
Ten puffing fifth-graders scramble up the woodland trail, checking compass points and noting various signs poking out of wildflower clumps along the way. The young hikers, accompanied by several of their fathers, pant in the mid-day warmth, but the trail is their favorite of five nature “stations” that make up an instructional course on a Tonganoxie farm called Quaker View.
PRICE IS RIGHT IN BAKER WIN
May 10, 1992
Had the Greek poet Homer been a sports writer, he would have composed an epic like Baker’s 23-22, 10-inning NAIA District 10 baseball championship win over Kansas Newman. The Iliad had nothing on the Wildcats’ odyssey out of an eight-run hole in the bottom of the ninth inning Saturday at ESU Field and into the Area Three tournament this week at KU’s Hoglund-Maupin Stadium.
HANDS-ON EDUCATION
May 10, 1992
John Hoopes could be described as Kansas University’s version of Indiana Jones. Hoopes, 33, assistant professor of anthropology, has traveled to Central America 10 times since 1978 and has explored caves, dug up archaeological sites, rubbed elbows with guerrillas and lived with natives there, much like the well-chronicled anthropology professor of the big screen, Indiana Jones.
KEEP IT OPEN
May 10, 1992
Lawrence city commissioners have wasted no time in putting a proposal to raise their quorum back on the city agenda. It took less than a week after Commissioner Bob Schumm said he would reconsider his opposition to such a measure for commissioners to set another discussion of the quorum issue. Schumm made the statement Monday; the quorum question is on the agenda for Tuesday’s meeting.
COMPETITION KEEN FOR COACHING POSTS
May 10, 1992
You say you want to be college a basketball coach when you grow up? Good luck. Like most fields these days, coaching is a tough one in which to land a job. “I’ve got over 120 letters and requests on my desk,” Kansas coach Roy Williams said earlier this week, referring to inquiries about the $16,000 a year, restricted-earnings coaching position on his staff. “Some of them are friends, too. It made my decision extremely difficult.”
CUFFS ROYALS
May 10, 1992
Roger Clemens has struck out as many as 20 batters in a single game. Clemens, Boston’s 29-year-old career strikeout leader, whiffed just four Royals on Saturday afternoon. But that provided little consolation for Kansas City after a feeble 5-0 loss to the Red Sox and Clemens, their three-time Cy Young Award winner, at Royals Stadium.
D
May 10, 1992
A nearly year-long effort to gain funding to rebuild fire-ravaged Hoch Auditorium at Kansas University neared a successful end Saturday in the Kansas Legislature. The Legislature approved and sent to Gov. Joan Finney a bill that spends some of the federal windfall money on four university building projects.
S DAY WISH
May 10, 1992
Okay, kids, before you read any further, go ask your mom what would make her life easier. Go ahead, do it. Well, if you did ask, you probably found out your mom would like a Mother’s Day gift that she can’t get in a pretty package or a nice card more time.
HOSPITAL REPORT
May 10, 1992
BIRTHS Paul and Muriel Crider, Lawrence, a girl, Saturday.
PIPE SHOP SERVES UP TOBACCOMEMORIES
May 10, 1992
At an eccentric downtown pipe shop, customers don’t always come in for tobacco products. They also stop in to get a glimpse of Lawrence’s past.
AREAS FACE PRESSURE FROM GROWTH
May 10, 1992
It’s a cry that’s echoed throughout Lawrence for many years. Try to build an apartment complex or some other high-density development in a neighborhood, and you hear a resounding, “Not in my back yard!”
KANSAS HAS HAD JUST TWO PLAYERS COME OUT EARLY
May 10, 1992
Notes and quotes while wondering how difficult it is to obtain a hotel room in San Diego with the America’s Cup finals in full sail there… In 17 years of the NBA’s early entry draft they called it the hardship draft in early days only two Kansas players have forsaken their remaining college eligibility, Victor Mitchell in 1982 and Norm Cook in 1976. Cook became the Boston Celtics’ No. 1 pick; Mitchell wasn’t drafted…
STUDENTS TAP MARKETS THROUGH FREE ADS
May 10, 1992
Luke wants to part with some baseball cards and will mow lawns to earn money. Matt is offering to care of your caged pet for a fee.
PRESERVATION GROUP HONORS 3 LOCAL RENOVATION PROJECTS
May 10, 1992
Three renovated buildings from the Lawrence area were recognized during an awards ceremony Saturday by the Kansas Preservation Alliance. Slides depicting work on the Free State Brewery, 636 Mass., renovation of the Benedict House and Cottages, 923 Tenn., and the rehabilitation of Constitution Hall in Lecompton were shown to members of the alliance, a group that promotes historic preservation throughout the state.
SURVIVOR STRIVES TO KEEP MEMORIES OF HOLOCAUST ALIVE
May 10, 1992
When Lawrence resident Eva Edmands speaks about her Holocaust experiences, she does so not only for her sake but “to keep alive the memory of the more than 6 million victims,” including her grandparents. Edmands spoke recently at the Hillel Holocaust Memorial Service and is wrapping up another year of talks about the Holocaust to schools and community groups. Her story is one of survival in Europe during World War II.
COUNTY TO CONSIDER WETLANDS WORK NEAR TRAFFICWAY
May 10, 1992
Douglas County commissioners on Monday will consider amending a contract to allow design of a wetlands area along the South Lawrence Trafficway. The commission will review the amendment with Howard Needles Tammen & Bergendoff, an Overland Park engineering consultant firm that is working with the county on the trafficway.