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Archive for Wednesday, May 6, 1992

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FOND MEMORIES
May 6, 1992
To the editor: My family and I wish to take this opportuniity to thank each of you for the many good years we have shared with you. Lawrence has been a second home to me since my college days, and home to my whole family since 1981.
MAKING DOWNTOWN VITAL
May 6, 1992
It is good that increased attention is being focused on what can be done to “vitalize” downtown Lawrence. After looking at a list of possible ideas of ways to improve the downtown’s economic health, Commissioner Bob Schumm was quoted as saying, “This is an awesome program.” City staffers had prepared the list of possibilities after receiving input from the commissioners.
PRESERVATION GROUP TO BE GIVEN AWARD
May 6, 1992
The Lawrence Preservation Alliance, along with a state representative and two other groups, will receive the Governor’s Award for Preservation on Monday in Topeka. The local organization is being recognized for its ongoing public education efforts and its contributions in neighborhood preservation, said Martha Hagedorn-Krass, an ex officio board member of the LPA. She said the LPA earned the recognition for its work over a five-year period.
MONEY MAY TALK, BUT DOHERTY HAS HIS EARS PLUGGED
May 6, 1992
Let’s see now, if your salary is $16,000 a year, your monthly paycheck is $1,333.33. Weekly that breaks down to $307.69. By the hour it’s $7.70 about twice the minimum wage if you work a 40-hour week, which Matt Doherty won’t. “It might be more like 50 cents an hour,” Doherty told me by phone from the Davidson basketball office in North Carolina.
FOR THE RECORD
May 6, 1992
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
TOUR GROUP RELIVES HISTORY ON THE OREGON TRAIL
May 6, 1992
Elizabeth Duncan, a Lawrence woman whose family traveled the Oregon Trail in 1867, came to life Tuesday through local actress Kay Kuhlmann. Kuhlmann entertained about 30 tour operators from across the United States, offering them a slice of life from the trail. During “Daughters of Courage: Stories of the Oregon Trail,” Kuhlmann shared the story of a family’s journey to the West that ended in tragedy.
KU WOMEN LAND GUARD
May 6, 1992
Dianna Williams, a 5-8 shooting guard from from Columbus, Ga., has signed a national basketball letter of intent with Kansas, coach Marian Washington announced today. Williams averaged 16.9 points per game, along with 4.2 assists at Carver High in Columbus.
S WHAT THE OUTCOMES WOULD REQUIRE OF STUDENTS
May 6, 1992
The outcomes developed in January by the Exit Outcome Task Force call for each student to: Demonstrate mastery of essential skills and knowledge including reading, writing, listening, speaking, math, social studies, science and computer use.
2ND FORUM SET THURSDAY MORNING
May 6, 1992
The Lawrence school district has scheduled only two public forums on a set of “exit outcomes” for students, but members of the Exit Outcome Task Force that developed the goals say they’re willing to speak to community groups about the goals. “We would be happy to take this show on the road,” School Board President Mary Loveland said Tuesday night during the first public forum on the goals.
LAWRENCE-AREA DISTRICTS FARE WELL
May 6, 1992
All nine Lawrence-area school districts would experience decreased mill levies and increased operating budgets under a school finance plan sent to Gov. Joan Finney on Tuesday night. The plan calls for a statewide mill levy of 32 mills for the 1992-93 school year and a local option budget with a cap of 10 percent more than this year’s budget.
LAWMAKERS LAUD COMPROMISE BILL ON SCHOOL FINANCE
May 6, 1992
Lawrence legislators said the school finance formula that the Kansas Legislature approved Tuesday makes school funding throughout the state simpler and fairer. “This is a great step forward in terms of tax fairness, in terms of educational opportunity and fairness and in terms of property tax relief,” said Rep. John Solbach, D-Lawrence.
OK
May 6, 1992
In a close vote Tuesday, Lawrence city commissioners decided to give neighbors of a proposed 52-unit apartment complex a chance to lobby for a change in zoning that would block construction of the complex. Neighbors of the proposed complex in west Lawrence say the apartments, which would be aimed at a student clientele, are “inappropriate” for their neighborhood, and increased traffic would endanger their children.
PRAEGER PANS HOUSE MAP
May 6, 1992
Another Lawrence legislator has decided to enter the battle to try to keep Eudora in a Kansas House district with Douglas and Johnson counties. Rep. Sandy Praeger, R-Lawrence, has asked leaders on the House reapportionment committee to reconsider placing Eudora with the 47th District, which consists mostly of Jefferson County.
KAMPSCHROEDER CHOOSES
May 6, 1992
Megan Kampschroeder, who helped lead Lawrence High’s volleyball and basketball teams to Class 6A state championships as a senior, will play both sports at Rockhurst College. Kampschroeder, a 5-11 basketball forward, is the Lions’ all-time leading scorer with 975 points and rebounder with 531 boards and was a first-team all-stater. She was all-Class 6A as a hitter in volleyball.
PAROLE BOARD SETS HEARINGS
May 6, 1992
The Kansas Parole Board has scheduled public comment sessions this month for inmates eligible for parole in June. Following is a list of inmates convicted in local courts, the county or counties where they were convicted, the crime committed and their current location. Joseph Lipp, Douglas, robbery, Norton Correctional Facility.
PACE
May 6, 1992
Even though April was Immunization Action Month, the Lawrence-Douglas County Health Department actually provided fewer immunizations than it did in April 1991. Barbara Schnitker, director of nursing for the department, said the numbers were somewhat disappointing.
SCHOOL PANEL DETAILS NEW PROGRAM
May 6, 1992
The cooperation of schools, parents, businesses and others in the community will be needed to help the Lawrence school district achieve some recently proposed “exit outcomes” for its students, members of a Lawrence school panel said Tuesday. Seven members of the Exit Outcome Task Force that proposed the outcomes in January fielded questions Tuesday night at the first public forum on the goals. Six people attended the forum, which was held at the district’s Service Center at 3705 Clinton Pkwy.
LINWOOD COUNCIL OKS STREET REPAIRS
May 6, 1992
A smoother ride is in store for motorists on Oak Street, the Linwood City Council announced Tuesday. Alma Dove, substitute city clerk, said the city plans to improve about three blocks of the dirt road east from Main Street. “It’s been graded and they’re going to rock it,” she said.
SCHOOL PLAN EASES TAX LOAD
May 6, 1992
Local schools will receive more state funding and Lawrence property owners will see a significant tax cut under a school finance bill passed Tuesday, a local school official said today. The district could see about $4 million more in budget authority, while property taxes should fall by at least 30 mills, says Supt. Dan Neuenswander.
LHS STUDENTS UNCOMFORTABLY NEAR LA RIOTS
May 6, 1992
Although most Lawrence residents were miles from the Los Angeles rioting sparked by last week’s acquittal of four white police officers in the beating of a black man, a group of Lawrence High School students found themselves uncomfortably close to the storm of protest. Twelve LHS students were in Anaheim, Calif., last week for the Distributive Education Clubs of America (DECA) national competition, where students were tested on their marketing skills.
TROUPE COMBINES FOLK STORIES, DANCE AND TEXT IN NEW PIECE
May 6, 1992
Try tackling Prohibition, slavery, Western expansion, populism and the Dust Bowl in one dance piece. Candi Baker and her dance company did, and so far they have lived to tell about it. “This is a lot to be dealing with in 40 minutes,” said Baker, artistic director of Lawrence’s Prairie Wind Dancers. “We’re probably going to do some tightening work after we present it.”
COUNTRY MUSIC ACT SERVES FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1992
As family and friends sat on metal folding chairs tapping their feet, the Barnett Sisters belted out country and gospel tunes during their recent performance at the Boling Grange, just southwest of Leavenworth. The five sisters Jane Turner, Tammy Mooberry, Lynn Heskett, Kathy Helton, and Julia Barnett perform spring, fall and Christmas shows, and appear at nursing homes and civic group gatherings. Their brother, Jess Barnett, joins in occasionally.
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT AWARDS PRESENTED DURING BANQUET
May 6, 1992
The Kansas University English department distributed cash awards totaling $15,000 to its faculty, staff and students at an honors banquet held recently at Alvamar Country Club. There were 11 award categories for outstanding teaching and research and general excellence in literature, and eight awards were given in writing competitions.
FOUR LOCAL BUSINESSMEN PICKED AS ENTREPRENEUR AWARD FINALISTS
May 6, 1992
The chief executives of four local businesses are among 35 finalists for Kansas and Western Missouri’s Entrepreneur of the Year awards. The four are Roger L. White of E and E Display Group, Philip N. Anderson of Kantronics, William P. Duncan of Oread Laboratories, and James H. Schwartzburg of Packer Plastics Inc.
SCHOOL BOARD SAYS BUILDING NOT FOR SALE
May 6, 1992
Citing the need for space to house various programs, Lawrence school officials have taken the district’s former administration center off the market. The Lawrence school board last month agreed to continue using the building at 1919 Del. for at least the 1992-93 school year. Given the district’s space needs, some school officials believe it could be some time before the district tries to sell the building.
EASTERN PARKWAY PATH TRAVELS THROUGH COMMISSION
May 6, 1992
Lawrence city commissioners gave the final stamp of approval Tuesday to the corridor they carved out for the Eastern Parkway, but tried to assure the public that nothing was set in stone. Commissioners approved a resolution adopting the corridor, but made slight alterations to clarify the public still has a say in the parkway’s design.
THOUGHTLESS CLODS
May 6, 1992
The young mother had been trying to arrange a birthday party for her 5-year-old and it was the morning of the event. She had sent out invitations with an “RSVP” notation (respondez s’il vous plait please reply). The mother had heard from very few invitees, and was not sure how many “goodies” to have ready, knowing she risked disaster because of the unannounced walk-ons who might appear. It would have been common courtesy for the other parents and guardians to respond.
OFFICIAL, STUDY PROVIDE TIPS ON PROTECTION FROM STORMS
May 6, 1992
Although Lawrence and Douglas County are enjoying mild spring weather, a county official issued a reminder that taking prompt action can save lives when conditions turn stormy. Paula Phillips, Douglas County Emergency Preparedness coordinator, said people should be ready to take cover when a severe storm or tornado warning is issued for the area.
RETIRED KU PROF, LARRY HEEBDIES
May 6, 1992
Lawrence “Larry” Heeb, 79, who taught at Kansas University for 25 years and was active in the state chapter of the American Association of Retired Persons, died today. He collapsed this morning while playing handball at KU’s Robinson Center, which he did three days a week, and was pronounced dead at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
INVESTIGATORS PROBE RURAL FIRE
May 6, 1992
An investigation is under way to determine whether misdeed or misfortune had a hand in two fires Tuesday morning at a house about 2 miles west of Lawrence. Wakarusa Township Fire Chief Louie McElhaney said this morning that his department worked both fires, the last of which heavily damaged the house. The structure was near the intersection of Douglas County roads 438 and 1050E, also known as Unfred Hill. A firefighter was treated by Douglas County Ambulance paramedics for a cut finger, but occupant Steven L. Unfred, 26, wasn’t hurt, McElhaney said.
BUILDING BOOM
May 6, 1992
If local contractors continue to build at the pace they’ve set during the first four months of this year, 1992 will nail down a record for construction in Lawrence. The city building inspector’s office reports that the total valuation on building permits issued during April was $7,513,614, which topped the April total of $7,269,546 during the boom year of 1988.
WINFIELD SHOOTING SUFFERED AS BILLIKEN
May 6, 1992
A Parade Magazine All-American, Julian Winfield was heralded as one of the most prized basketball recruits to sign with St. Louis University. Considering all the hoopla, some considered his only season as a Billiken a disappointment.
CITY KICKS SPORTS COMPLEX PROPOSAL BACK TO STAFF
May 6, 1992
After getting the ball deep in their territory from city staff, Lawrence city commissioners on Tuesday punted a proposal to help complete Youth Sports Inc. complex. Instead of acting on a YSI request to complete the complex, commissioners asked parks and recreation officials for a more comprehensive report on possible solutions to city shortages in sports facilities.
ONCE NEW RULE GOES INTO EFFECT, KANSAS WILL EMPLOY FOUR COACHES ON RESTRICTED EARNINGS
May 6, 1992
Kansas will employ four restricted-earnings coaches once NCAA legislation limiting coaching staffs goes into effect on Aug. 1. The four will be assigned to men’s basketball, women’s basketball, track and field, and baseball. According to Richard Konzem, KU assistant athletic director for compliance, the restricted-earnings aides for track and field and for women’s basketball haven’t been determined.
HOSPITAL REPORT
May 6, 1992
DISMISSALS Connie Muse and baby girl, Baldwin.
MASS
May 6, 1992
Lawrence city commissioners answered the pleas of residents near the intersection of 17th and Massachusetts streets Tuesday by ordering a traffic signal for the intersection, the site of a recent fatal accident. “I don’t see any other reasonable alternative for the people in the area that provides safety for all the citizens,” Commissioner Bob Schumm said.
COLUMBUS CLASS GAVE PARTICIPANTS NEW WORLD OF IDEAS
May 6, 1992
A unique local class that focused on the legacy of Christopher Columbus was so successful it may be offered again in the fall, organizers said. “The Columbian Legacy,” which focused on alternative viewpoints on Christopher Columbus and his impact on the Americas, was held for the first time this spring by Haskell Indian Junior College. It was the first local Haskell course open to non-Native Americans.