Archive for Sunday, May 3, 1992

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WILL ENFORCEMENT BE EQUAL?
May 3, 1992
It will be interesting to observe how Kansas University officials deal with “open containers” and the consumption of alcoholic beverages by KU students prior to and during the school’s commencement ceremonies. Not long ago, at the strong urging of KU officials, the city of Lawrence adopted a new policy on the consumption of alcoholic beverages on city property and the new law also applies to the consumption of such beverages on university property. In addition to actual consumption, the mere presence of open containers of such beverages is now illegal.
COUNTY, SCHOOL LEADERSHIP
May 3, 1992
Two extremely important personnel matters were finalized this past week with the selection of a new superintendent of Lawrence schools and a new county administrator. According to members of the Lawrence School Board, Douglas County commissioners, citizens asked to visit and interview the various candidates for each of the positions and long-time acquaintances of the two men selected for the positions, the Lawrence school system and the Douglas County courthouse are getting two top-flight individuals to head up the respective offices.
COLONIAL-STYLE HOME SITS AT 1656 ILL.
May 3, 1992
The two-story colonial revival-style home at 1656 Ill. features hardwood floors throughout, thanks to its current owners, Becky and C.R. “Rick” Snyder. The house was built in 1926 for Frank Russell, a KU engineering professor, and his wife, Minnie. Subsequent owners included the Vinton Fischell and Paul Wilson families. The Snyders purchased the property in 1977.
BUNGALOW, 1655 MISS.
May 3, 1992
Mabel Rice’s home, 1655 Miss., is a Craftsman-style bungalow built about 1916 for W.H. Twenhofel, a KU assistant professsor of geology whose academic interest fitted neatly with the emphasis on natural materials characteristic of bungalow architecture. In 1917, W.L. and Florence Eikenberry lived in the house. At one time, he was dean of KU’s School of Education. Rice also is associated with the university. She is a professor of speech, language and hearing.
S OLD HOME
May 3, 1992
James Naismith, inventor of basketball, and his wife, Maude, built the house at 1700 Miss., now home to Lois and Lew Llewellyn, a retired Haskell Indian Junior College coach. Historic records show Naismith did the planning and, with his son, Jack, most of the construction work. The Naismiths lived there until 1934, when they moved down the street to 1708 Miss., a home on the walking tour that also is part of the University Place Neighborhood’s weekend of events.
1616 INDHOMESTEAD
May 3, 1992
Ken and Katie Armitage played a role in the revival of University Place neighborhood when they retrieved their home from the student housing pool. The Armitages he is a KU professor of systematics and ecology and biological science and she is a historian have lived in the homestead-style three-story home at 1616 Ind., since the late 1970s.
1625 LA. WORK SET THE STAGE FOR REVIVAL
May 3, 1992
Bob and Karen Gould purchased and renovated the house at 1625 La., in 1973, adding a circular deck on the south and a greenhouse in back thereby launching an area-wide rehabilitation that eventually encompassed the saving of other old homes and construction of new ones as well. The Goulds’ gambrel-roofed house was designed by KU art professor William A. Griffith and built in 1909. The first owner, whose identity has not been determined, had it only a year but the second owner, KU professor Homer A. Josselyn, lived there with his family until the Goulds bought it.
1636 LA. ADDS MODERN TOUCH
May 3, 1992
Designed and built by local architect David Evans for his family, the contemporary home at 1636 La., was completed in 1979 and a family room was added onto the south side last year. Ann Evans says her home was designed for the site. She noted that the property, on the northeast corner of Louisiana and Edgehill Road at 16th Street, previously was owned by the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, which at one time intended to make it into a parking lot.
WILDLIFE REPLACES RIDING HORSES AT 1645 LA.
May 3, 1992
The oldest home on the tour, the Italianate-style brick home at 1645 La., was built in 1874 for Benjamin Akers as headquarters for his Kansas Stud Farm, a 100-acre showplace operated in partnership with Col. Amasa Sprague of Providence, R.I. Today, George and Margaret Wedge are the owners. He is a KU associate professor of English and linguistics; she is a social worker with the Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services.
COGGINS FAMILY RESTORES 625 SUNNYSIDE AVE.
May 3, 1992
The home at 625 Sunnyside Ave. represents another University Place example of a classic home reborn. The house was built in about 1922 for KU professor C.F. Nelson and his wife, Hearty, and had a basement apartment for many years. Later, it all was divided into student apartments.
NEW LABEL BRINGS OUT THE BEST IN RECORDINGS
May 3, 1992
For jazz fans, the birth of a new label dedicated to the best of America’s premier improvisatory art is an event. In February, the Philadelphia-based Evidence label issued five long-out-of-print albums by the idiosyncratic Sun Ra. It was a signal moment prompting adulatory press coverage and hefty radio rotation. Now, in its second release, Evidence continues its precedent of well-packaged reissues with a quintet of sterling sessions by some of contemporary jazzdom’s cutting-edge forces. In each, liner notes and artwork are first-class. However, dates for the original recording sessions are missing. This significant detail, one trusts, is an item that will be taken care of in future releases.
CITY SCHEDULES MEETING ON PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
May 3, 1992
Lawrence residents will have a chance to voice their concerns about public transportation Monday for a study on the feasibility of mass transit in the city. City officials and consultants from DeShazo, Starek & Tang, a Dallas-based firm hired to conduct the study, plan to gather input from residents at a public hearing set for 6:35 p.m. Monday at the meal site in Babcock Place Apartments, 1700 Mass.
WSU TASK FORCE USES EX-KU AD IN CONSULTANT ROLE
May 3, 1992
Notes and quotes while wondering if anybody mistakely believes the Los Angeles Riots are a World League football franchise… Wichita State hired Monte Johnson, Kansas’ athletic director from 1982-87, to work as a consultant to its 36-member task force charged with plotting the future of WSU’s athletic program. That report is due soon. Notably, Johnson’s former right-hand man at Kansas, Gary Hunter, is one of the three finalists for the Shockers’ AD vacancy. Hunter is currently at Idaho…
BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB HONORS LOCAL YOUTH
May 3, 1992
The Boys and Girls Club of Lawrence held its Annual Awards Banquet on Saturday to honor youths who demonstrated outstanding leadership and service to the club. More than 150 people attended the event, and dinner was prepared by the club’s board of directors. The Youth of the Year Award was presented to Kala Banks, a ninth-grader at Central Junior High School. Kala participated in the Kansas State Youth of the Year Contest and was honored as a runner-up by Gov. Joan Finney.
SARAH JANE STEVENS
May 3, 1992
Services for Sarah Jane Stevens, 85, Redondo Beach, Calif., are pending. Mrs. Stevens died Friday, May 1, 1992, at South Bay Hospital in Los Angeles.
CHRISTIAN WALTON
May 3, 1992
Graveside services for Christian Patrick Walton, 3 months, Kansas City, Mo., will be 2 p.m. Tuesday at Chapel Hill Cemetery in Kansas City, Kan. Christian died Friday, May 1, 1992, at Bethany Medical Center, Kansas City, Kan.
ART IN THE PARK SET FOR TODAY
May 3, 1992
Expecting a high in the 70s and mostly clear skies, organizers of today’s Art in the Park hope more people than ever will peruse the works of area artists at the annual event. Debra Edgerton, president of the Lawrence Art Guild Assn., said Art in the Park usually draws 8,000 to 9,000 people.
LAWRENCE ALLIANCE STATEMENT
May 3, 1992
The Lawrence Alliance is outraged at the verdict in the Rodney King case. We are all diminished by this act of injustice. The verdict reflects the pervasive racism which is so deeply embedded in our culture and which causes violence to beget violence. Violence by police officers or by individuals as is occurring now in Los Angeles cannot be justified.
COUNTY TO REVIEW MUSIC FESTIVAL PLANS
May 3, 1992
The Douglas County Commission on Monday will see whether a Lawrence concert promoter has taken care of business regarding a music festival scheduled for Saturday near Eudora. Commissioners will review whether Reed Brinton, Lawrence, has filed the necessary paperwork required for a temporary business use permit granted him earlier this year for the River Valley Music Festival.
LA VIOLENCE LIKELY TOPIC OF SERMONS
May 3, 1992
The violent aftermath of verdicts acquitting four Los Angeles police officers of the videotaped beating of motorist Rodney King are expected to be a topic today at the pulpits of many of Lawrence’s churches. But some pastors will be recommending that their congregations remember the philosophy of another King the late Martin Luther King Jr. who espoused non-violence in the fight against discrimination.
KU GRADS FACE SHAKY EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK
May 3, 1992
Kansas University students graduating this month are more anxious about landing good jobs than graduates in previous classes, KU’s placement director said. “For many reasons, students are very concerned about whether they’re going to find a satisfactory job,” said Terry Glenn of the University Placement Center.
FOR LOCAL STUDENTS
May 3, 1992
The Lawrence school district has scheduled two public forums this week on a set of “exit outcomes” for students that a school panel developed in January. The first forum will be at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the district’s service center, 3705 Clinton Pkwy. The forum will be broadcast on Sunflower Cablevision Channel 47. The second forum will be at 7:30 a.m. Thursday at Kennedy School, 1605 Davis.
HASKELL UNVEILS PLAN FOR NEW FACILITIES
May 3, 1992
Haskell Indian Junior College President Bob Martin is excited about the school’s future and its newly devised facilities master plan, which calls for “functional zoning.” Martin said the plan was created in connection with Haskell’s Vision 2000 goals. Vision 2000 is the college’s planning blueprint and outlines academic and facility development through the ‘90s.
CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS
May 3, 1992
The women who participated in the conscientious objector movement during World War II received little notice then, but a Kansas University doctoral student hopes to shed some light on their achievements. Rachel Goossen, a doctoral student and assistant instructor in KU’s history department, is doing her dissertation on women who objected to World War II. Although women were exempt from the compulsory military draft and therefore technically could not be considered conscientious objectors, they did participate in the objector movement, Goossen said.
DAVID P. MOSES
May 3, 1992
Services are pending for David Paul Moses, 35, Los Angeles. Mr. Moses died Friday, May 1, 1992, at the University of Southern California Los Angeles County Medical Center after a long illness.
SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAM EXPANDING
May 3, 1992
While a new state law will result in significantly more Lawrence students starting off their day with a school breakfast, the local cost of serving additional students probably will be minimal, a Lawrence school official said Friday. Under a law passed last month, all Kansas schools are required to have a breakfast program in place by August 1993. However, schools where less than 35 percent of students are receiving free or reduced-price lunches can be considered for exemption from the requirement.
BAND TRAVELS WITH THE BLUES
May 3, 1992
You’d think people growing up in Princeton, N.J., the affluent university town between New York and Philadelphia, would have no cause to sing the blues. Well, the members of Blues Traveler sing the blues, and they grew up in Princeton. They don’t sing traditional blues, but rather old-fashioned rock ‘n’ roll, which has roots in the blues.
REDEFINING WESTERN CIVILIZATION
May 3, 1992
Kansas University’s Western Civilization program will jettison the works of Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton and James Madison next fall to make room for more readings on how science and technology shaped Western thought. The program also will include more writings from ancient Egypt and from Muslim culture, a Kansas University faculty member said Saturday.
OUTLOOK REIGNS ON LILAC LANE
May 3, 1992
The KU chancellor’s residence, called The Outlook, at 1532 Lilac Lane, will be open only on Sunday, May 10, for the University Place Neighborhood tour. Home today to Chancellor Gene Budig and his wife, Gretchen, The Outlook was built in 1913 by Lawrence banker Jabez B. Watkins for his wife, Elizabeth.
RURAL COUNTIES PLAN FOR THEIR FUTURE
May 3, 1992
Strategic planning sounds like a topic for discussion in a corporate board room or during military war games, but the concept has hit home for rural counties across Kansas as they plan for their economic future. The Ottawa-Franklin County Economic Development Corp. (OFCED) recently received a $14,000 state grant to develop a countywide plan, said Brent Fogle, president of the organization.
TIGERS CLAW KANSAS TWICE
May 3, 1992
Missouri put Kansas out of its misery on Saturday. The Tigers blasted the Jayhawks, 14-7 and 12-4, officially killing KU’s hopes of qualifying for the four-team Big Eight postseason baseball tournament.
A PHOTOGRAPHIC MIRROR
May 3, 1992
A woman wearing a bright, flowing gown runs across landscapes and inhabits the rooms and courtyards found in Ruthie Moccia’s black-and-white photographs. The same model keeps showing up in photograph after photograph, and viewers come to suspect that Moccia must use the same woman perpetually. Then, when Moccia shows up for an interview at the Gallery IV, where her photographs are on display, one discovers the model is Moccia herself. Instead of using a surrogate for her feelings, Moccia takes the rather daring step of placing her own image into her photographs.
3,000,000 BOOKS AND COUNTING
May 3, 1992
Friends of the Library presented Kansas University Chancellor Gene Budig with an atlas Saturday evening that represented the university’s 3 millionth library volume. Jim Seaver, president of the group, said the new edition of “Die historischen Karten zur Entdeckung Amerikas” (“Historical Maps on the Discovery of America”) was presented to honor Budig, whom Seaver said has shown invaluable support for KU’s libraries.
FOR THE RECORD
May 3, 1992
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
HOSPITAL REPORT
May 3, 1992
BIRTHS Bruce and Betsy Scott, Lawrence, a boy, Thursday.
UNIVERSITY PLACE WELCOMES PUBLIC
May 3, 1992
Doors to nine University Place Neighborhood homes, including one built by the inventor of basketball, James Naismith, will be open to the public Saturday and May 10. The special homes tour also will include a Craftsman-style bungalow, the Kansas University chancellor’s residence, a soaring contemporary home and the 1800s headquarters of what was called the Kansas Stud Farm.