Archive for Thursday, June 11, 1992

SCOTT UNDERGOES LEG SURGERY

June 11, 1992

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Kansas basketball forward Richard Scott, who recently suffered a broken bone near his left knee, had a three hour surgery performed by Dr. Ken Wertzberger on Wednesday at Lawrence Memorial.

Scott, who last year averaged 10.1 points on team-leading 63.9 percent shooting, was injured playing pick-up basketball in late May in his hometown of Little Rock, Ark.

Technically suffering an ``avulsion fracture of the left fibula,'' Scott will wear a brace for the next four to six weeks.

KU trainer Mark Cairns said he hoped Scott would be able to resume physical activity in August.

Scott is expected to be ready for the opening of basketball practice on Nov. 1.

"That's why we did it now. So he'd have plenty of time (to recover)," Cairns said today. "I think he'll make it back by then. It should heal fine."

CAIRNS EXPLAINED how Scott broke the bone.

"Richard went up for a jump shot after making a move on a guy and he felt something pop in his left knee," Cairns said. "He continued to play on it.

"Later it was stiff and sore. X-rays showed he pulled off a piece of the fibula. That's the bone you can feel on the outside of the leg. He must have put a lot of pressure on it. Instead of it tearing, he pulled off a piece of the bone.

"This is unusual. It's one of those freaky things. You don't see it very often," Cairns added.

KU coach Roy Williams said he was disappointed Scott will miss so much time.

"Richard and I had some good talks in the spring," Williams said today. "He was going to work on certain parts of his game that would help him. Being out up to a 10-week period will hurt his development and hurt our team.

"It is good we get it done now so when fall gets here he'll be excited, ready to go and hungry," Williams added.

CAIRNS, WHO talked to Scott today, said he was in good spirits and eager to begin rehab. "We'll probably have to hold him back," Cairns said.

Williams noted that Scott is "upbeat."

"He understands it might have healed without it (surgery), but this way better insures the healing process," Williams said. "He's positive about the whole thing, but it's very discouraging to me. It's especially disappointing because Richard had such a great semester academically. He's worked very hard."

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