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Archive for Sunday, July 26, 1992

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RISE IN REGISTRATION
July 26, 1992
Good news from the Douglas County clerk’s office. County voter registration is 3,900 above the registration total for the 1988 presidential election. The total in Lawrence was up by about 3,000 voters, according to County Clerk Patty Jaimes.
COUNTRY COOKING
July 26, 1992
Somewhere amid the intellectual clang of alternative rock, the hyperactive twang of funk-punk and the radical bang of hip-hop, a Northeast Kansas country band called Sundown is playing some hot tunes in a genre that’s been called white man’s blues. And at least one Sundown member thinks country is the sound of these recession-burdened times.
KSU, OKLAHOMA, IOWA STATE REPORT ATTENDANCE DROPS
July 26, 1992
Notes and quotes while wondering if the Mark Davis trade was the Royals’ most blatant giveaway since they unceremoniously sold first baseman John Mayberry to the Toronto Blue Jays in 1978… NCAA figures released last week show Kansas State’s basketball attendance was down an average of 2,102 fans per game last season, more than any other Big Eight school. Also suffering declines were Oklahoma (1,587) and Iowa State (1,132). Kansas, meanwhile, led the Big Eight again, averaging 15,732 fans. That’s 68 per game under capacity…
TEXTBOOKS FACE LENGTHY SELECTION PROCESS
July 26, 1992
Before a textbook reaches Lawrence school children, it must pass the scrutiny of a committee of teachers, according to the district’s division director of curriculum. P. Kay Duncan said the process for adopting textbooks varies with each school district in Kansas. In Lawrence, school officials form a committee comprising teachers of the particular course and those who teach classes affected by the course.
RAIDERS REACH ZONE FINAL
July 26, 1992
Steve Leibengood came within an inch of a five-inning no-hitter Saturday night in the American Legion zone tournament at Ice Field. As it was, Leibengood pitched a one-hit shutout, and the Lawrence Raiders wound up in this afternoon’s zone final with an 11-0 whitewashing of Kansas City Post 199.
LABELS GET BACK TO BASS-ICS
July 26, 1992
With the still-evolving role of the bass as a co-equal and yet unique voice in jazz, it’s not surprising that the number of new recordings led by bassists continues to grow. SWALLOW, Steve Swallow (ECM-XTRAWATT-6 314 511 960-2): The remarkable Steve Swallow is arguably the most significant electric bassist in contemporary jazz. Eschewing the percussive and rock-oriented grooves generally associated wit the instrument, Swallow has forged a highly lyrical sound and soloistic approach that has informed his own work as well as that of such collaborators as vibraphonist Gary Burton, keyboardist Carla Bley and guitarist John Scofield.
BACK HOME
July 26, 1992
Ann Trusty sees a very thin line between contemporary paintings on canvas and her contemporary art quilts on cotton. She aims to strike emotional chords without being too representational, she says, drawing inspiration from within as she works.
FOR THE RECORD
July 26, 1992
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
NORTH LAWRENCE GROCERY ROBBED
July 26, 1992
A man made off with an undetermined amount of cash Saturday after ordering a cashier at a North Lawrence grocery store to open a safe and give him money, Lawrence police said. Sgt. Ron Dalquest said the robbery occurred at 8:59 p.m. Saturday at Roger’s Food Center, 608 N. Second.
LOCAL FOOD BARN STORE OFFERED TO NON-GROCERS
July 26, 1992
The real estate company that is marketing the Food Barn Store at 23rd and Iowa is offering it to both grocery and non-grocery companies. That information came out in a letter being mailed to business owners by Real Estate Dynamics Inc., an Overland Park firm hired to sell several Food Barn stores in Kansas and Missouri.
JUDICIAL NOMINEE IS KU GRADUATE
July 26, 1992
A Kansas University alumna has been nominated by President Bush to the U.S. District Court for Kansas. The nomination of Kathryn H. Vratil, a partner in the Kansas City area law firm of Lathrop & Norquist, was announced late last week by U.S. Sens. Bob Dole and Nancy Kassebaum, both R-Kan.
PRIMARY PITS NOVICE AGAINST VETERAN
July 26, 1992
Republicans casting August primary election votes in the 45th District House race will choose between two candidates cut from different molds. One candidate is orchestrating her fourth campaign for the Kansas Legislature. The other is a political novice. The candidates have different views on abortion rights, term limits of elected public officials and health care policy.
JAYHAWK AUDUBON TO AID ENDANGERED OWL
July 26, 1992
The Jayhawk Audubon Society is doing its bit to help protect an avian friend from the Pacific Northwest. Jayhawk Audubon Society President Carol Estes will be in Washington, D.C., this week lobbying for legislation that would protect ancient forests in the Pacific Northwest, home of the Northern spotted owl.
SUSPECT IN SEX CRIMES EXERTED POWER OVER YOUTHS, PARENTS SAY
July 26, 1992
A Topeka man who is accused of molesting several Lawrence boys he recruited for a Masonic fraternal organization was “Charles Manson in a Brooks Brothers suit,” the father of a boy who joined the organization said. Parents of two teen-agers who were members of the organization, Order of DeMolay, said during interviews Saturday that their first impression of Eric Sims was of a well-dressed, articulate, up-and-coming businessman.
CRITICS QUESTION NEED TO ACCREDIT LAWRENCE POLICE
July 26, 1992
An expensive and lengthy examination of the Lawrence Police Department seems unlikely to produce major changes within the department, which has some local residents who have been critical of the police wondering why the city is bothering with it. The examination is part of a national police accreditation program ordered by the city in May after discussing how to prove the professionalism of the department in the wake of the April 21, 1991, fatal police shooting of Gregory Sevier, a Native American.
KC SHOOTING LEAVES LAWRENCE GIRL DEAD
July 26, 1992
Authorities said a 15-year-old girl, originally reported to have been the victim of a fatal drive-by shooting, may in fact have been hit accidentally by a man who was showing off his pistol. The 20-year-old suspect, who police say is a gang member, was arrested Friday afternoon at the house where the shooting took place. The man, who lives at the house, had not yet been charged as of Saturday night, said department spokesman Bob Jones.
THE BUSINESS OF BOOKS
July 26, 1992
Children opening a textbook to read the day’s assignment probably don’t give much thought to how the book found its way to their school. In fact, they’re on the receiving end of a major business.
DEMOLAY OFFICER LAMENTS EFFECT ON ITS VOLUNTEERS
July 26, 1992
The grand secretary of the Order of DeMolay, a fraternity for young men ages 13 to 21, said he hoped all volunteers would not be judged by the alleged actions of a DeMolay adviser who has been accused of sexual misconduct. “We’re concerned at everything we see in society all the organizations that are having trouble with volunteers and so forth,” said Joe Manning, Edmond, Okla. “But it’s still an extreme minority. It’s a tragedy when all volunteers sometimes get painted with a very large brush, because it makes it hard for us to get good volunteers.”
OUR PLANETARY MESSES
July 26, 1992
In the relatively early days of full color photographs in daily newspapers, an Ohio publication carried what should have been the ultimate reminder of the dangers our planet faced from pollution. It was around 1960, and the photo showed, in living, and dying, color, what was happening to the waste products from a major industrial plant. There was this yellow-sickly green goo flowing from a drainpipe at the plant into a blue river that ran adjacent to the site. As the runoff hit the water, it converted the healthy blue into a ghastly ribbon that widened as the flow of the river spread the yellow-green ribbon and carried the poison downstream. Near the input site, several dead fish were on the river bank.
SWITCH TO WEDNESDAY-FRIDAY OK WITH KANSAS OPEN GOLFERS
July 26, 1992
The Kansas Open golf final is Friday instead of Saturday, but nobody seems to mind. In fact, it appears to be a popular move.
TUTORING JOBS ARE HOT COMMODITY AT KU
July 26, 1992
More than 70 Kansas University students are hoping to be chosen for 40 to 50 part-time tutoring positions available this fall through a College of Liberal Arts and Sciences program. The Student Support Services Project (SSSP) received 74 applications from students hoping to land part-time tutoring jobs this fall.
NORTH LAWRENCE GROUP TO DISCUSS NORTH SECOND STREET PLAN
July 26, 1992
A special meeting to discuss a city staff report outlining possible improvements along North Second Street will be held Monday by the North Lawrence Improvement Assn. The meeting, which will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the International Order of Odd Fellows Hall, 615 Lincoln, is expected to draw interested business owners and residents in North Lawrence, said Bob Moody, NLIA president.
S TANGIBLE BENEFITS HARD TO SEE
July 26, 1992
Law enforcement accreditation may be best described as a detailed housecleaning and audit, a spokeswoman for the accreditation board said. But officers who have been through the process say accreditation doesn’t have much impact outside the police station because it gives few tangible benefits to residents.
BUFFALO SOLDIERS FINALLY GET THEIR DUE
July 26, 1992
History not only was made but rectified Saturday when people from all over the country gathered at Fort Leavenworth to honor the African-Americans who served between the 1860s and the 1950s in the U.S. Army’s segregated cavalry regiments. That’s the view that many of the remaining soldiers have taken as they’ve tried to come to grips with what they describe as a long-overdue, yet unbelievable event.
EMPLOYERS FIND APPLICATION OF DISABILITIES ACT TRICKY
July 26, 1992
Local employers are sharpening their job descriptions and crossing their fingers as the lastest and perhaps vaguest phase of the Americans With Disabilities Act goes into effect today. “What I understand about the law is that no one understands how it’s going to be applied,” said Dwayne Peaslee, business manager of the Plumbers and Pipe Fitters Local No. 763.