Archive for Monday, July 6, 1992

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July 6, 1992
Workers with the city’s street department reinstall New Orleans’ artist Lin Emery’s “Flame” sculpture Monday in front of city hall. Piecing the sections back together is Kurt Mayhugh, left, and Wayne Andrews. The sculpture, originally installed in 1982, was taken down June 11 for preventive maintenance steps and to be polished.
FIRE, POLICE OFFICERS REPORT QUIET WEEKEND
July 6, 1992
Fourth of July fireworks didn’t spark much additional activity for Lawrence fire and police officers over the weekend. Fire Chief Jim McSwain said the rain Saturday soaked the ground and structures enough to reduce the risk of fireworks-related fires.
S BARK IS WORSE THAN ITS BITE
July 6, 1992
Local officials say the bark of the storm that blew through Lawrence this weekend was a lot worse than its bite. Except for a house under construction near 27th and Harper that reportedly had several of its walls toppled in the storm, the local damage caused by high winds, heavy rain and hail was relatively minor, officials said.
BUSINESSES THROUGHOUT CITY SET FOR SIDEWALK SALE BARGAIN-HUNTERS
July 6, 1992
Merchants thoughout the city are gearing up for the annual sidewalk sale, set for July 16. Lisa Blair, downtown administrator for Downtown Lawrence Inc., said most downtown businesses will participate in the event.
FLORENCE B. MATHEWS
July 6, 1992
Graveside services for Florence Boyd Mathews, 83, Lawrence, will be at 11 a.m. Tuesday at the Bennington Cemetery in Bennington with the Rev. Grant Clowers officiating. She died Sunday, July 5, 1992, at Valley View Care Home.
LAURA E. OSBORN
July 6, 1992
Services for Laura Etta Osborn, 96, Tonganoxie, will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday at the First Baptist Church, McLouth, with the Rev. Ray Talbot officiating. Burial will be in McLouth Cemetery. Mrs. Osborn died Sunday, July 5, 1992, at the Tonganoxie Nursing Center.
WILLIAM H. MIZE SR.
July 6, 1992
Services for William Henry Mize Sr., 67, Oskaloosa, will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday at Hampton-Barrett Funeral Home, Oskaloosa, with the Rev. Dick Griffin officiating. Burial will be in Pleasant View Cemetery in Oskaloosa. Mr. Mize died Saturday, July 4, 1992, in a Sioux City, Iowa, hospital.
RADIO STATION LOSES SIGNAL
July 6, 1992
A break in a transmission line kept KANU-FM and the Audio-Reader Network off the air Sunday and until shortly before noon today, when equipment repairs were completed. The public radio station licensed to Kansas University lost its signal about 11:30 p.m. Saturday.
APPRAISER DOUBTS OFFICE WILL BE RE-AUDITED
July 6, 1992
A prominent legislator and a state official believe a Shawnee County judge’s order should lead to a county-by-county auditing of values put on property for tax purposes. But Douglas County Appraiser Marion Johnson said he assumes that last year’s audit of his department means the county has a “good idea of what needs to be done to bring Douglas County up to the level the state says we should be at and where we want to be at.”
PLAN CONSENSUS MAY BE DIFFICULT
July 6, 1992
Horizon 2020 organizers don’t expect much trouble bringing residents together to help draft the plan. Striking an agreement on elements of the plan is the challenge. “There will be things that we cannot reach agreement on,” said Graham Toft of Stratplan, an Indianapolis firm, who is helping in the consensus-building process. “We have to recognize that we live in a diverse society.”
COUNTY SUPPORTS PLAN FOR RURAL LAND
July 6, 1992
The Douglas County Commission today sent a text amendment to the Lawrence-Douglas County Planning Commission that will require some rural residents to plat their land when developing it. The rural residents affected by the text amendment are those living in Primary Urban Growth Areas (PUGA), which is rural land surrounding Lawrence, Baldwin and Eudora where most rural development is occurring.
TRAVELLERS GO TO 12-0 AT HOME WITH 8-1 WIN
July 6, 1992
The Kansas City Northland Braves tried to surprise the Maupintour Travellers with a revamped lineup Sunday night, but it didn’t work. The Travellers romped to an 8-1 semi-pro baseball win, keeping their home record perfect at 12-0.
WILL OSBORNE, NEW AD BECOME MUTUAL ADMIRERS?
July 6, 1992
It’s six days past the beginning of the fiscal year, and, for the most part, all is well in Big Eight Conference athletic departments. Here’s a mid-summer state-of-the-union assessment:
LL KEEP WHAT WE HAVE
July 6, 1992
The recent earthquakes and aftershocks in California, along with constant threats of additional fatal and destructive temblors in many western locales, probably have caused a lot of residents of Kansas to settle gladly for the erroneous label of “tornado alley.” Chances are, most Kansans wouldn’t be willing to trade their natural disasters for those in unsettled California.
CIRCUS ROLLS INTO TOWN
July 6, 1992
Local youths and the young at heart can share a time-honored childhood experience today the circus has come to town! The Carson and Barnes Circus set up shop at the Douglas County 4-H Fairgrounds this morning with lions and tigers and elephants galore. Carson and Barnes promises acrobats and wild animal trainers are ready to thrill fans of all ages under the five-ring circus’s “biggest big top on earth.”
SACHS WINS IN MAINLINE
July 6, 1992
Some contend there’s no such thing as a moral victory. But a morale victory, that’s a different matter. Doug Sachs defeated Roland Thornqvist, 2-6, 6-4, 6-3, to win the Mainline Classic tennis tournament on Sunday at the Allen Fieldhouse courts.
FIREWORKS, A DAY LATE, STILL WOW THE CROWD
July 6, 1992
They had flowery names like chrysanthemum bursts, color-changing peonies and silver comets. But nothing spoke more for the pyrotechnics at the Lawrence Jaycees’ Fourth of July fireworks show postponed one day because of thunderstorms on the actual holiday than the resounding applause and cheers from the people who gathered at Burcham Park to watch them.
DIFFERENT SYSTEM
July 6, 1992
A group of Kansas University and area public school educators, having recently returned from a five-week trip to Japan, said they were astonished by the Japanese educational system and students’ attitudes. “The Japanese work hard and play hard,” said Valerie Janesick, KU associate professor of curriculum and instruction in the education school.