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Archive for Friday, April 10, 1992

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April 10, 1992
A culinary benefit to be staged Sunday at the Country Club Plaza aims to help the Kansas University Medical Center and other agencies treat babies born with prenatal exposure to drugs and alcohol. Members of the Junior League of Wyandotte and Johnson counties have planned the benefit, called “A Tour de Forks,” to raise start-up money for Project FACES, which will be based at the Children’s Miracle Network at the KU Medical Center.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
As local architect David Evans looks ahead to his year as chair of the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce, he’s drafting a blueprint for the business community’s role in the future of Lawrence. “If you look at all of the things we want to have the arts, all of the cultural activities, social service kinds of things we like to do, if you look at the quality of life all of that is made possible by a viable economic community,” Evan said.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Building projects at Kansas University energize the Lawrence economy by infusing millions of dollars into the community each year, KU and local officials say. “When you get people working on $10 million buildings, that’s a lot of folks working in town,” said Gary Toebben, president of the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Hank Booth, 1991-92 chair of the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce, says he’s pleased with the chamber’s accomplishments and the economic vitality of Lawrence in the last year, despite a nationwide recession. “I believe we’re all lucky to be here in Lawrence,” Booth said. “By and large, we’ve remained extremely healthy, especially compared to the state of Kansas and other communities throughout the nation.”
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Bob Billings expects the addition of several new businesses to make 1992 a banner year for Oread West Corporate and Research Park, the 400-acre business park he’s developing on the western edge of Lawrence. For starters, Billings, who also developed the Alvamar golf courses and residential subdivisions, said he expects an announcement this month from a local dentist who plans to construct new offices for his practice in Oread West.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Lawrence residents probably never considered themselves guinea pigs, but that’s how Southwestern Bell sees the community. However, instead of subjecting the town to unknown substances or medical treatments, the phone company likes to try out services here first, said Mike Scott, area manager for Southwestern Bell.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
With increased competition in the local market during the past five years and the possibility of more on the way, Lawrence bankers say customer service is the name of the game. For established banks, keeping customers happy is the top priority because the relative newcomers in the market are intent on wooing customers away.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Perhaps no component of the local business landscape has been in greater flux in recent years than banking. For starters, there are more contenders in the local marketplace than there were five years ago. At the outset of 1987, Lawrence had four commercial banks, a number that had remained constant for 20 years.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Lack of mass transit in Lawrence is a problem that should concern not only city officials but the local business community as well, said a city official and local employment consultant. “It’s a very real problem that some people don’t have a way to get to their jobs,” said City Commissioner Shirley Martin-Smith, who owns and operates Martin-Smith Personnel Services Inc.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
The spirit of volunteerism has taken hold of individuals, agencies and companies in Douglas County. The result has been a busy year for the Roger Hill Volunteer Center. Director Lanaea Heine said the center, located at 211 E. Eighth, has provided an impetus for new volunteering initiatives during the last year.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Although it’s going to be awhile before any pavement is down, the steady groundwork prepared last year by Lawrence and Douglas County officials bodes well for the futures of the South Lawrence Trafficway and Eastern Parkway. The two highway projects, along with the eventual widening of U.S. Highway 40 (Sixth Street) to County Road 13 west of town, are planned to make up Lawrence’s circumferential road system.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Lawrence’s economy, which has been somewhat impervious to the nationwide recession, should remain strong in the coming year as long as the city continues to grow, managers and owners of major local retail businesses said recently. “We think 1992 will be a good year, and we feel that consumers in Lawrence generally are optimistic about their own future,” said Joe Flannery, president of Weaver’s Department Store, Inc., 901 Mass.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
To better handle the postal needs of a growing city, the U.S. Postal Service will be building a new Lawrence substation in the coming year. Plans for the new facility could be finalized as early as next month, officials say.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
The Kmart Distribution Center, 2400 Kresge Rd., continues to be on the move. For 1991, the center had another busy year of keeping shelves stocked at 220 stores throughout the 12-state territory it serves, according to Mike Virgilio, general manager of the center for the past five years.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
In its centennial year, the Lawrence Journal-World is continuing the long tradition of using newsprint and ink to supply information to area readers. But at the same time, the newspaper’s parent company, the World Co., is branching into new areas of information gathering and dissemination. During the last year, the World Co. has added two new departments, World Geo Solutions and Access, both of which are intended to provide information in new ways.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Based on past trends, it appears the Lawrence area will see more manufacturing jobs in the future, say two local men who keep an eye on the manufacturing climate. “My crystal ball is always clouded,” said Bill Martin, economic development director for the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce. “But if you predict the future based on the past we’ll see growth in Lawrence and in Kansas.”
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Looking for a job can be one of the most stressful times in an individual’s life, and recessionary times may add to the tension for Kansas University graduates who will walk down the Hill in May. However, graduates don’t have to experience so much pain.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
James Cash Penney opened up the Golden Rule store in Kemmerer, Wyo., on April 14, 1902. Ninety years later the national chain, known as JC Penney Company Inc., boasts approximately 1,300 outlets. Stores throughout the country are marking the 90th anniversary with a four-week celebration that started on March 22 and ends April 18.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
With roots in a pioneer past, Lawrence is poised for a high-tech future. That future, says a Kansas University business professor, is tied to how the city links up with KU, its main “natural resource.”
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Eight community leaders have been elected as the newest members of the board of directors of the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce and will serve three-year terms. Their terms of office begin April 1 of this year. The new board members and their professional affiliations are:
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
The dry weather that scorched area crops last summer has created a drought in the cash registers of local farm implement dealers. “Business is a lot slower than it was,” said Daren McConnell, manager of McConnell Machinery Co. “It’s not looking very good right now.”
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
It’s been two years since the Lawrence Riverfront Plaza opened its doors. And the factory outlet mall has made good on its promise to fill its retail space and bring in out-of-town business to the city’s downtown.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Wal-Mart employees will be packing their bags in Lawrence as the manager of the local store prepares for an exciting but hectic year. “It’s going to be something,” says store manager Mike Benson, who is preparing for the store’s relocation across the street and down the road.
COMPUTER SCIENCE WOES
April 10, 1992
In announcing his resignation Monday as chairman of the Kansas University computer science department, William Bulgren, said his departure might help resolve dissension in the troubled department. That certainly is the hope of everyone who cares about KU, and Bulgren deserves credit for taking a move that he believed was in the best interests of his department and university.
TO THE EDITOR
April 10, 1992
To the editor: The volunteer advocates of Douglas County Rape Victim Support Service (RVSS) would like to express our appreciation to Deb Gruver and the Lawrence Journal-World for the recent series of articles dealing with the very difficult subject of sexual assault and rape.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Lawrence’s Sallie Mae loan servicing center is seeing plenty of business these days. The number of student loan borrowers the center serves has held steady at about 700,000 for two years now, and the center processes about $60 million in loan payments every month. Also, the center, which has about 500 employees, added 19 positions last fall in the area of collections.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
As economic development director of the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce, Bill Martin’s task is to scour the countyside for new businesses to lure to the city. To that end, his itinerary last year featured Boston, Cleveland, Detroit, Cincinnati, Hartford, Conn., and Providence, R.I. Martin sent out another 2,500 direct mail inquiries to companies.
TO THE EDITOR
April 10, 1992
To the editor: Wasn’t it interesting how Wint Winter snuck his “moderate” pro-abortion bill through the Senate last week, after telling constituents who called his office that he had no intention of doing exactly that.
TO THE EDITOR
April 10, 1992
To the editor: I appreciate the privilege of having a primary to express my preference for a presidential candidate. It took all of five minutes to express my choice. In the past I have spent three hours or more in a caucus before my vote could be counted and a decision reached. Does anyone really believe over 9,000 people in Douglas County would have or could have attended party caucuses? For those who say it is too expensive, I can only respond that democracy is not cheap, but what is the alternative?
TO THE EDITOR
April 10, 1992
To the editor: Last Tuesday there was a power outage that affected most of downtown Lawrence for at least 45-50 minutes during rush hour. I was working downtown at the time and was distressed to hear several near collisions at nearby intersections where the traffic signals were out. About 20 minutes after the power outage started, I called the police department to inquire if they were aware of the problem and to suggest that some officers might be needed to direct traffic at some of the busier intersections. I was curtly informed that they were aware of the situation and were trying to do something about it. By the time power returned half an hour later, there still was no sign of any police attention to the problem. The only person seen directing traffic was a citizen volunteer.
MANY WORKERS KEEP PAY AS IS
April 10, 1992
Starting in March, most people found their paychecks were about $4 to $6 heftier, courtesy of President George Bush’s plan to stimulate the economy. The additional spending money is the result of the president’s decision to change withholding tables for federal income taxes. The changes were expected to increase the take-home pay of Americans by $25 billion during the next 12 months.
ELECTIONS FILL OFFICER POSTS FOR KU GOVERNANCE GROUPS
April 10, 1992
Kansas University faculty and students Thursday elected officers for University Council and University Senate Executive Committee for the 1992-93 academic year. Dick Tracy, associate professor of educational psychology and research, was elected presiding officer of University Council.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
The state of Kansas is weathering the national recession better than most of the country but remains mired in a depression in terms of its investment in new technology businesses, two Lawrence venture capitalists say. “That’s a problem,” said Charles Becker of Campbell-Becker Inc. “Technology is going to be the vehicle that brings us into the future. Technology will eventually create the jobs, the wealth, the quality of life.”
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Officials at business parks in Eudora and Baldwin say they take a passive approach to recruiting new tenants. At Eudora’s Intech Business Park, planners hope the park’s location, transportation advantages, accessible workforce and incentives will draw new businesses to the park.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Despite talk of budget cuts for Haskell Indian Junior College, the school’s president said his staff is moving ahead with plans to increase enrollment and begin a four-year program in teacher education. President Bob Martin said the goals of Vision 2000, the planning document outlining Haskell’s direction through the year 2000, remain in place.
HASKELL LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE FEATURES NATIONAL YOUTH GROUP
April 10, 1992
Created to help Native American youths achieve their goals, United National Indian Tribal Youth Inc. is working with about 30 students this weekend at a conference at Haskell Indian Junior College. Shawn Braun, Haskell’s student senate president, said he and other students at the Bureau of Indian Affairs school started “talking a few months ago” about forming a UNITY youth council. So Braun decided it would be worthwhile to bring the UNITY staff to campus for a training conference.
TRAFFIC COMMISSION TO CONSIDER INCREASING SPEED LIMIT ON KASOLD
April 10, 1992
Members of the city’s Traffic Safety Commission will discuss increasing speed limits on Kasold Drive north of Sixth Street at their meeting Monday. The meeting will get under way at 7:30 p.m. in the city commission meeting room in city hall, Sixth and Massachusetts.
STATE COURT SETS DATE ON TRAFFICWAY CASE
April 10, 1992
The Kansas Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on the South Lawrence Trafficway case May 22. The hearing date was announced by Bob Fairchild, Douglas County counsel. He said the county has filed its supplemental brief with the high court.
TOP SPELLER PREPARING FOR STATE COMPETITION
April 10, 1992
Ken Takusagawa says he’s actually better at math and science than at writing, but that didn’t stop him from winning the Douglas County Spelling Bee in February. He’ll be representing the county Saturday at the 39th annual All-Kansas Spelling Bee in Topeka. The competition begins at 1 p.m. in the Garvey Fine Arts Center auditorium at Washburn University.
ROUNDUP PLANNED FOR KINDERGARTNERS
April 10, 1992
Several Lawrence elementary schools will participate in the district’s Kindergarten Roundup in coming weeks. In the roundup, children who will be 5 or older before Sept. 1 are eligible to enroll for fall 1992 kindergarten classes. Parents should contact their neighborhood school for an appointment. The roundup will be held at Lawrence grade schools on the following dates:
JOHN L. SPIESS
April 10, 1992
Services for John L. Spiess, 81, Hays, will be at 2 p.m. Saturday at St. Joseph’s Church here with the Rev. Matthew Gross officiating. Burial will be in St. Joseph’s Cemetery in Hays. Mr. Spiess died Thursday, April 9, 1992, at Hays Medical Center.
KEITH D. HAMPTON
April 10, 1992
Services for Keith D. Hampton, 58, Olathe, will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at the W.L. Frye & Son Funeral Home here with the Rev. Dean Hickerson officiating. Graveside services will be at 10 a.m. Monday at the Ulysses Cemetery in Ulysses. Mr. Hampton died Thursday, April 9, 1992, at St. Luke’s Hospital in Kansas City, Mo.
JOHN R. MARQUETTE
April 10, 1992
Services for John Raymond Marquette, 55, Overland Park, will be at 2 p.m. Saturday at Newcomer’s Chapel in Overland Park. Burial will be in Johnson County Memorial Gardens. Mr. Marquette died Wednesday, April 8, 1992, at Shawnee Mission Medical Center after a long illness.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Summer months in Lawrence mean a three-month break for a majority of Kansas University students. For the people who live in town it means a break from congested streets, the late-night parties and the crowded university parking lots. It also means a slowdown in revenue for many businesses, but the Lawrence Visitors and Convention Bureau is trying to change that.
PAROLE BOARD SCHEDULES HEARINGS
April 10, 1992
The Kansas Parole Board recently announced the schedule of public comment sessions to be held this month regarding inmates eligible for parole hearings during May. During the sessions, anyone can comment about inmates eligible for parole hearings.
POLITICS GETS CREDIT FOR SEC CRACKDOWN ON INSIDER TRADING
April 10, 1992
Insider trading is a victimless crime prosecuted only because of political pressures upon the Securities and Exchange Commission, a legal scholar told a Kansas University audience Thursday. Henry G. Manne, dean of George Mason University’s School of Law, said SEC enforcement actions against insider trading probably are nothing more than an attempt to preserve the profits of exchanges, brokerage firms, investment banking houses and other market specialists.
2 KILLED IN CRASH
April 10, 1992
Two people were killed in an accident about 11:35 p.m. Thursday at the intersection of Interstates 635 and 70 in Wyandotte County. The victims were identified as Cynthia A. Baker, 25, Bonner Springs, and Brian Strah, 19, Basehor.
EDUCATION CONFLICT CLOUDS ISSUES, SPEAKER SAYS
April 10, 1992
The supposed conflict between research and teaching at American universities is a “red herring” that masks critical problems in higher education, a former Kansas University official said Thursday. “Research, for large segments of the public, is often viewed as a financial boondoggle that does not have much relevance to their daily lives,” said Frances Horowitz, head of the graduate school and university center at City University of New York.
KU STUDENT BODY OFFICERS ELECTED
April 10, 1992
The Vision coalition, composed of several current Kansas University student senators and committee members, swept this year’s student elections, held Wednesday and Thursday. Brad Garlinghouse of Topeka was elected student body president, and Lance Wright of Kansas City, Mo., was elected student body vice president.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Few people may realize it, but every can or bottle of Pepsi has roots right here in Lawrence. That’s because since 1991, FMC Corp.’s North Lawrence plant has been the sole supplier of phosphoric acid for all Pepsi sold domestically. “Phosphoric acid is kind of what puts the zing in Pepsi, and kind of a tart taste,” Ed Flynn, manager of the local FMC plant, explained.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
After two years and two near misses, East Hills Business Park found the third time was the charm to land a company for its vacant shell building. Pitman-Moore Inc., an international animal health and nutrition company, moved its distribution center from Kansas City, Mo., to the shell building this month after signing a seven-year lease in January. The company is the world’s second-largest veterinary pharmaceutical firm.
RAYMOND J. DIEKMAN
April 10, 1992
Services for Raymond J. Diekman, 79, Tonganoxie, will be at 11 a.m. Monday at Quisenberry Chapel in Tonganoxie. Burial will be in Mount Hope Cemetery in Topeka. Mr. Diekman died Thursday, April 9, 1992, at his home.
TRY THE CRANE, NOT THE COUCH
April 10, 1992
It likely was some psychobabblist who invented the notion of fear confrontation as a way to control phobias. Afraid of snakes? Go to a pet store and hold one. Afraid of crowded places? Visit one. Afraid of enclosed places? Ride around in an elevator.
SQUIRRELLY PARENTING SKILLS
April 10, 1992
Wayne and Sharral Andrews say their dog, Boo, has always loved other animals. But since Boo hasn’t had puppies in about seven years, they didn’t suspect she would have had maternal instincts especially toward two baby squirrels that the Andrews took in on Saturday.
WASHINGTON BOUND
April 10, 1992
If everything goes as planned, a Haskell Indian Junior College sophomore will join 60 other college students this summer for Georgetown University’s Institute on Political Journalism. Carol Burns, a copy editor for The Indian Leader, Haskell’s student newspaper, was accepted into the six-week program, which features two journalism classes and a concurrent internship in the Washington, D.C., area.
COUNTY ALLOWS DISPUTED BROWN BALLOT
April 10, 1992
Democratic presidential candidate Jerry Brown today gained a vote in Douglas County today during the canvassing of ballots at the county courthouse or did he? County Commissioners Mark Buhler and Mike Amyx, who canvassed the ballots with County Clerk Patty Jaimes and Deputy Clerk Jo Dalquest, agreed to let a second ballot cast by Kansas University student Scott Matthews stand for now.
911 RABIES CALLS CONCERN OFFICIALS
April 10, 1992
Local law enforcement officers and wildlife officials this week said local residents may be getting a bit rabid over the recent rabies outbreak. “I would say people are overreacting a little bit,” said Rob Ladner, area law enforcement officer for the Kansas Wildlife and Parks Department.
HOT AND COLD EFFECTS
April 10, 1992
The shift from winter to spring this year seemed to most people like walking from a well-lit room to, well, a well-lit room. Hardly anybody noticed. But people involved in businesses that count on the consequences of frosty temperatures, ice and snow noticed. While the average consumer frolicked in the fresh air, store owners and managers gazed at shelves stocked with goods to battle winter’s fury and floors void of customers.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
A Eudora company might not have won a medal, but it did make an appearance at this year’s Winter Olympics in Albertville, France. M-PACT, a manufacturer and distributor of medical and orthopedic products based at the Intech Business Park, received two orders for one of its products.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
President Bush preaches a cut in the capital-gains tax rate as a cornerstone of his economic recovery package. A tax break for middle-income Americans is the economic panacea espoused by Democratic presidential contender Bill Clinton. But in Lawrence, the leaders of the some of the city’s largest manufacturing firms have their own ideas about what they’d like government do to get the economy back into high gear.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
March 26, 1991, is a date that will live in infamy for Lawrence insurers. At about 4:30 p.m. that day, the city was smacked by a torrential 10-minute hailstorm. The hailstones, some the size of golf balls, left lasting marks on local roofs, cars and the minds of people who insure the community against these kinds of storms.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
National health insurance in the United States won’t happen in 1992, but it is an issue whose time may be coming, said three local insurers. But what form national health insurance will take is the subject of much conjecture. Chuck McPheeters, Northwestern Mutual agent and president of the 1,900-member Kansas Association of Life Underwriters, said the subject is so involved that all parties will have to strike a balance for it to work.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
For years, Lawrence’s Hallmark Cards production plant has helped make holidays special with its ribbons, bows and greeting cards. Now the local plant will play an even bigger role in that area by producing the bulk of Hallmark’s seasonal counter cards. Hunter Cole, manager of the local plant, said new benefits and new challenges will accompany that change.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Last year’s decline in interest rates was a rude awakening for many conservative investors, according to local stock brokers who are benefiting from an exodus of funds from bank certificates of deposit. “What’s happened is that because rates were high in the past, people with CDs are used to getting better rates,” said Garth Terlizzi, investment broker at LPL Financial Services. “Now they’re getting rate shocked, so to speak.”
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Good Shepherd Presbyterian Church members weren’t disappointed with the sound coming from the 1,200 pipes in their custom-made organ built by Lawrence’s Reuter Organ Co. “When that organ played I must admit my eyes got moist,” said the Rev. Robert Moser, who recently came to the plant with 30 church members to hear the organ.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Answering a call to help improve the city parks system, hundreds of Lawrence residents are lending a hand by taking a park under their wing. In February, the Lawrence Parks and Recreation Department sent out invitations to more than 150 local organizations to help care for a park or public area as part of its new “Adopt-A-Park” program.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Low interest rates and a boom in local home building activity have been keeping people in the home-loan business busy. First they went through a boom in refinancing existing mortgages. And now that’s being replaced by a surge in mortgages for new home purchases.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
The manager of the local Farmland Industries plant says 1992 will be a year for retrofitting and upgrading. “As far as for this plant, it’s been an exceptionally good operational year,” said Dick Lind, manager of the plant, located just east of the city limits off Kansas Highway 10. “We think it’s going to continue on.”
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Ask Lawrence’s new car dealers how their sales are doing this year and most will give you the same answer they’re optimistic. Several say sales are up over the last year. And some say they’re hoping the economy will surge this summer to fuel what they hope will be a solid year of sales.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
March Madness, state championships and record-setting performances. Sports fans in Lawrence got to see it all. The habit of Jayhawks and Lions having a field day on the field of play continued during the past year, bringing trophies, exposure and other rewards to the city and to Kansas University.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
John Kiefer uses basketball analogies to describe the success of his stereo store. He compares his brand selection to this year’s Olympic basketball team: only the best. His inventory includes every manufacturer that has won an award this year, which provides “bench strength.” He talks about his team all members excelling at their individual roles from the audio division to the bookkeeper. “Kief’s has grown because of the fact that we have wonderful people working here,” he said. “Any success or growth we have had is because of our employees. Having a building and components anybody can do that. But acquiring and keeping employees is what we stand for. Each employee in the store is assigned an area to study and understand. If they all left, there’s no way I could run this place.”
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
A focus of community activity in Lawrence at the turn of the century, the Union Pacific depot may regain its position as a community center. Restoration of the 102-year-old depot on North Second Street is right on track, according to the Bob Moody, president of Lawrence Depot Management Inc., the group dedicated to preserving the landmark.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Like Horace Greeley’s young man, the Lawrence Arts Center may go west. But not too far west. Plans are in the works to expand the arts center directly west across the alley that now runs beside the building at Ninth and Vermont. The the expansion will cost an estimated $4 million.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Douglas County residents with a yen for water sports, camping, hiking or hunting don’t have to travel far for a taste of the great outdoors. Two nearby U.S. Army Corps of Engineers lakes, Clinton and Perry lakes, provide just the ticket for outdoor fun. Clinton Lake, located four miles southwest of Lawrence, stretches eight miles up the Wakarusa Valley offering boaters about 7,000 surface acres of water.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Little by little, brick by brick, two Lawrence men are restoring life to a building long dormant on the banks of the Kansas River. By the time they finish next year, Mike Elwell and Ron Miller hope to transform the old Consolidated Barbed Wire building into a vibrant area with artisans, sculpture displays, music and even office space.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
For lack of any major, multimillion-dollar projects and because of a dropoff in new business construction, the valuation of construction projects in Lawrence hit a five-year low in 1991. Although the number of building permits issued through the building inspector’s office increased in 1991 as compared with 1990, inspector’s office records show the total valuation of the 1991 permits dropped significantly from the 1990 level.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
The biggest problem for Lawrence home builders this spring may be keeping up with the demand for new houses. “It seems to be being consumed almost as fast as it’s being built,” David Reynolds, president of Appletree Homes, said of new single-family housing.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Visitors who find themselves in one of the 858 hotel, motel or bed and breakfast rooms in Lawrence may be glad to know that they are helping to contribute to the economy of the city in a big way. Lawrence presently has 12 hotels and motels and one bed and breakfast. Guests pay a 4 percent transient guest tax when they take out a room in Lawrence. For 1991, the total take from the tax was $260,402. The tax goes to help finance programs promoting tourism and conventions in Lawrence as well as attracting film production to the area.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Although unexpected cost increases and scheduling setbacks have delayed by a year the installment of several improvements at the Lawrence Municipal Airport, officials are optimistic that the systems will be up and running by the end of 1992. “I’m very optimistic,” said Assistant City Manager Rod Bremby, who has been working with planners and contractors for the installation of improvements that eventually will make the airport safer and more accessable. The airport is located northeast of the city on U.S. Highway 24-40.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Tom Ferriter wanted the employees of Quaker Oats in Lawrence to pick out some art. And he wanted to help the Lawrence Arts Center at the same time. So Ferriter, the plant manager, had his employees go to the arts center’s 1991 benefit art auction and bid on what they wanted. The art ended up in the reception room of the plant, and the arts center ended up with contributions from Quaker Oats.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
The Lawrence Chamber of Commerce’s 1991 Citizen of the Years is cited in a new book called “Women of Influence, Women of Vision” as a key woman in leadership during the 1940s and ‘50s. But Emily Taylor’s contributions to women didn’t stop there, and she’s still an active player in the movement for social equality.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
David Evans, vice president of Gould Evans Associates, P.A., has taken over the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce’s top leadership position, chair of the board of directors. Other officers heading the major divisions of the chamber for the 1992-93 year are Gary Sollars, chair-elect; Smitty Belcher, vice chair of economic development; Dan Watkins, vice chair of community affairs; David Ambler, vice chair of operations; and Jane Bateman, vice chair of membership.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
When DCCCA moves to it’s new home at Clinton Parkway and Kasold Drive in late May, it will mark the agency’s first relocation since its founding in 1974. Bruce Beale, director of the private agency that deals with substance abuse prevention and treatment, said the growth of DCCCA during the last few years had necessitated the move to the $1,050,000 building now under construction. The agency is now located at 2200 W. 25th,
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
The millions of dollars that flow from Kansas University to the Lawrence economy buffer the city from swings in the business cycle, a KU researcher says. “The university is relatively immune to the business cycle. That has a good impact on employment stability,” said Bob Glass, research associate at KU’s Institute for Public Policy and Business Research.
LIONS, O-NORTH SPLIT DH
April 10, 1992
Lawrence High’s softball team earned a doubleheader split with Olathe North on Thursday afternoon, and coach Sandra Walker was excited. “This was important because it helped put some self-confidence in our kids,” Walker said. “It showed that we can beat anybody. We handed (Olathe North) their first loss of the year. I love that statistic.”
FOR THE RECORD
April 10, 1992
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
With a consultant officially on line to assist in the development of Horizon 2020, the long-range planning guide for Lawrence and Douglas County is firmly pointed on the fast track toward completion, says Price Banks, city-county planning director. “This year, this is when it gets exciting,” Banks said of the Horizon 2020 process, whose roots date at least two years to 1990 when the Lawrence-Douglas County planning office began lobbying for funding to begin work on a document to replace the city’s comprehensive planning guide, Plan ‘95.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
As Lawrence’s population has grown steadily over the past few years, local utility companies have been growing with them. And officials from the city’s natural gas and electric utilities say they’re on track to meet the city’s residential, commercial and industrial needs.
WEATHER WATCHER
April 10, 1992
This summer should be wetter and milder than average in Kansas because of an area of warm water in the North Pacific Ocean, a KU weather researcher says. Joe Eagleman, professor of meteorology, physics and astronomy, has been involved in a long-term research project that shows a correlation between the water temperature in the Pacific Ocean and Kansas weather.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
As strange as it may sound, Jeff Darby likes his high school because, as he puts it, “someone always has an eye on you.” “That’s a pretty good incentive not to skip,” he said.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Local physicians say new advances in medical technology have benefited patients, but they’re quick to add that technology doesn’t come without a price. “There’s no doubt that while technology is wonderful, it’s very expensive,” said Dr. Mark Praeger, a general surgeon and chief of staff at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Following a national trend, the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce has scrapped its traditional yearlong membership drive in favor of a more concentrated effort. Ann Wiklund, the chamber’s director of membership and communications, said the change, implemented for the first time last fall, proved successful.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
They know what they have, so now the Association for the Development of the K-10 Corridor is trying to figure out what to do with it. Last year, the association published the results of its inventory of facts and figures about Kansas Highway 10 from Lawrence to the Johnson County suburbs of Kansas City.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Lawrence golfers didn’t get the public course they were after, but plans for additional links still advanced in the past year. Lawrence city commissioners knocked plans for a municipal golf course back into the rough last year, putting them out of play at least for a while.
PESTICIDE PLAN TAKES EFFECT TODAY
April 10, 1992
A plan designed to limit runoff of the pesticide atrazine into surface water goes into effect today in a designated “pesticide management area,” which includes Perry Lake and most of Jefferson County, according to an official with the State Board of Agriculture. Dale Lambley, division of plant health director, said the nation’s first pesticide management area contains the boundaries of the entire Delaware River Basin and will affect an estimated 4,000 farmers in Jefferson, Atchison, Brown and Nemaha counties.
FORMAN REMAINS UNBEATEN FOR LHS
April 10, 1992
Barton Forman may not be able to beat his brother, but he’s doing a pretty good job on his high school competition. Forman, a junior, is 3-0 in his first season on Lawrence High’s boys tennis team. He defeated Joel Janda, 10-5, in No. 3 singles as the Lions downed Washburn Rural, 9-3, Thursday at the Lawrence Tennis Center.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
If a strategy being pursued by the Lawrence Convention and Visitors Bureau pans out, a lot more tour buses will be stopping in Lawrence this year. “We have put a little more emphasis in the area of group travel,” said Judy Billings, the CVB’s director.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Home builders name features on local buyers’ wish lists
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
By GARY TOEBBEN President Lawrence Chamber of Commerce There are 1,300 more people working in Douglas County today than one year ago. That is an increase of 3 percent, and it occurred during a period when the national economy was in a slump.
-MANDERING
April 10, 1992
Out in California, not many people are unaware of the identities of Edmund G. Brown Sr. and Edmund G. Brown Jr., both of whom served the state in varying ways as governor. The father used the more common name of Pat, and the son goes by Jerry. The latter is now seeking the Democratic nomination for president. There are pros and cons on both Browns and how good or bad they were as governors. But if the younger Brown, who says he’s raised something like $5 million for his campaign through an “800” toll-free telephone number, isn’t a better administrator than he is a selector of how he should appear on a ballot, he deserves to be snowed under and eliminated from any chance of occupying the White House.
CITY COMMISSION TO REVIEW PREFERENTIAL BIDDING ISSUE
April 10, 1992
The Lawrence City Commission will take another look Tuesday night at whether to give local contractors and vendors an edge over their competitors in bidding situations. The issue will come up during the regular agenda portion of the meeting, which begins at 6:35 p.m. Tuesday in the commission chambers at city hall, Sixth and Massachusetts.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
One thing that Lawrence school officials definitely are not this year is bored. As if hiring a new superintendent weren’t enough to keep them busy, the district also is planning new schools to handle a growing enrollment, trying to determine technology’s niche in education and participating in a program that completely overhauls the way schools are accredited.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
If some new schools aren’t built soon, the ever-growing enrollment in Lawrence School District 497 is going to create a serious space crunch for students and teachers, say Lawrence school officials. Even now, some building principals say their schools are too full.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
There’s an old saying: “Sometimes it’s better to be lucky than good.” No matter what the calling. For people involved in farming in the 1990s, whether in the Lawrence area or anywhere else, it takes huge amounts of both commodities, expertise in management and good luck, to succeed and consistently close the books in the black.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
While other businesses across the country face uncertain economic conditions, a Lawrence high-technology company has continued to see its sales grow. “We have had no recession here,” says Phil Anderson, president of Kantronics Inc., 1202 E. 23rd.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Grocery shopping in Lawrence is becoming more specialized as customers seek more than just meat and potatoes, local grocery store owners and managers say. They say that in addition to milk, bread, butter and other staples, grocery store customers increasingly are seeking more specialized items from in-store delicatessens and bakeries and more international foods.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
When downtown merchants and business leaders discuss downtown Lawrence, they invariably link images of a town center with talk of economic vitality. Their top priority, outlined in a proposal for downtown redevelopment now being considered by the Lawrence City Commission, is to enhance the city’s central business district to ensure its economic strength for the future and its status as the heart of the community.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Although unexpected cost increases and scheduling setbacks have delayed work on several improvements at the Lawrence Municipal Airport, officials are optimistic that the systems will be up and running by the end of 1992. “I’m very optimistic,” said Assistant City Manager Rod Bremby, who has been working with planners and contractors on improvements that eventually will make the airport safer and more accessible. The airport is located northeast of the city on U.S. Highway 24-40.
TRAFFIC MAY BE TOO LIGHT FORLIGHT
April 10, 1992
The city’s hopes of placing a traffic light at Sixth and Mississippi streets look pretty dim after recent traffic counts at the intersection, said Terese Gorman, city engineer. Vehicle counts conducted April 1 through last Friday by the city show traffic at the intersection does not meet Kansas Department of Transportation standards for installing a light, Gorman said.
LARRY D. GLESSNER
April 10, 1992
A memorial service for Larry D. Glessner, 45, Wichita, will be at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Cochran Mortuary in Wichita. Mr. Glessner died Sunday, April 5, 1992.
KOED IN PRACTICE, DOUGLAS REALIZED HE HAD TO CHANGE
April 10, 1992
Maurice Douglas stood on the Kansas football sideline in street clothes on that chilly late November afternoon when Tony Sands, inexhaustible and irrepressible, rushed smack dab into the NCAA record book. “I was just standing there so I kept track,” Douglas recalled. “I didn’t know if he could get it or not.”
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
The Lawrence Chamber of Commerce has been addressing issues through 16 task forces and other groups during the 1991-92 year. Here’s a list of the ‘91-‘92 groups, their chairs, and their accomplishments through the year. New chairs for the 1992-93 task forces will be named at a later date.
PROGRESS EDITION
April 10, 1992
Aquaculturist William McGuinness didn’t grow fond of the taste of catfish until he started raising them by the thousand for Farmland Industries. “People equate catfish with a muddy taste. I did too until I came here,” he said. “When a catfish is grown in clean water like ours it doesn’t have a taste. When you cook it you can make it taste any way you want.”