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Archive for Tuesday, April 7, 1992

ARTS CENTER SCHEDULES 12TH ANNUAL AUCTION

April 7, 1992

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For Ann Evans, the purpose of the annual Lawrence Arts Center Art Auction goes beyond the money it raises. The auction shows the artists who donate works are as concerned about the center as the rest of the public.

"We ask businesses and the community in general for support, and they see the fact that the artists are willing to contribute as significant,'' said Evans, director of the center.

The 12th art auction, featuring 146 works in its catalog, is scheduled for 7 p.m. Saturday at the center, Ninth and Vermont. Open bidding is set to start at 8 p.m. Kasey Wold will be the auctioneer, and music will be provided by the Lonesome Hobos.

Works up for bid are now on display at the center. The catalog lists 81 works to be auctioned Saturday night and another 65 that will be part of a silent auction whose results will be announced Saturday. Proceeds go to the Arts Center, but the artists have the option of reserving 30 percent of the bid to cover framing expenses and materials.

THIS YEAR'S auction features a colored-pencil drawing by Elizabeth "Grandma'' Layton, the Wellsville artist who is now the subject of an exhibit at the National Museum of American Art in Washington, D.C.; a landscape by area artist Dennis Helm; and works by Kansas University faculty members Joe Zeller, Roger Shimomura, Robert Brawley and Doug Warnock, among others.

"I just stand back at the door in awe of all the wonderful pieces there are here,'' Evans said. "The artists are very generous.''

One of those artists is Janet Satz, who donated a collograph print called "Landscape.''

"I think supporting the arts is important, and it's one way I can help out,'' she said.

THE AUCTION is open to the public and usually draws a spectrum of people, Evans said. Bidders show up in clothing that ranges from formal evening attire to jeans and T-shirts.

"It's very representative of Lawrence, from the arts community to business people to neighborhood people, people from all walks of life,'' she said. "I've seen pieces bought by schoolteachers, lawyers and people you haven't seen before.''

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