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Archive for Monday, September 23, 1991

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WINDY CITY TO DRAW LHS ORCHESTRA
September 23, 1991
The Lawrence High School Orchestra has been selected as one of three high school orchestras nationwide to participate in the Mid-West International Band and Orchestra Clinic, which will be in December in Chicago. Now that the LHS students have passed the audition, they are preparing for the performance and working to raise money for travel costs.
NEW CARS POSE SOME PROBLEMS FOR LOCAL POLICE
September 23, 1991
The Lawrence Police Department is not immune from some of the reported problems police departments across the country are experiencing with their 1991 Caprice Classic patrol cars. Lawrence Police Chief Ron Olin said today that local officers have reported some of the hubcaps on the 16 sedans the department obtained this year including 13 patrol cars have been falling off.
RAYMOND L. SUTTON
September 23, 1991
Services for Raymond L. Sutton, 81, Tonganoxie, will be at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at the Tonganoxie United Methodist Church with the Rev. David Petersen officiating. Burial will be in Hubbel Hill Cemetery in Tonganoxie. Mr. Sutton died Saturday, Sept. 21, 1991, in Manor Care Home in Topeka.
JOSEPH D. LYSTER
September 23, 1991
Graveside services for Joseph Dale Lyster, 82, Lawrence, will be at 1 p.m. Wednesday at Memorial Lawn Cemetery, Emporia. The Rev. John Richter will officiate. Mr. Lyster died today, Sept. 23, 1991, at Valley View Care Home in Lawrence.
CHARLES E. SCHAMLE
September 23, 1991
A Mass of the Resurrection for Charles “Chuck” E. Schamle, 66, Lawrence, will be at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at St. John the Evangelist Church with the Rev. Mike Scully officiating. Burial will be in Mount Calvary Cemetery in Ottawa. Mr. Schamle died Sunday, Sept. 22, 1991, at St. Frances Hospital in Topeka.
TOLBERT SERVICES
September 23, 1991
Services for William Wesley Tolbert, 44, Lawrence, have been changed. Funeral services will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Warren-McElwain Mortuary, and graveside services will be at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Leavenworth National Cemetery.
PASCHALL SERVICES
September 23, 1991
Services for Mae Paschall, 61, Lawrence, will be at 2 p.m. Wednesday at Warren-McElwain Mortuary with the Rev. Ron Goodman officiating. Burial will be in Oak Hill Cemetery. Mrs. Paschall died Saturday, Sept. 21, 1991, at her home after a long illness.
ENROLLMENT IN WELLSVILLE DOWN
September 23, 1991
Of nine Lawrence area school districts surveyed, Wellsville is the only one to experience a decrease in enrollment for the 1991-92 school year. Friday’s Journal-World reported the figures for six districts, and three others released their numbers today.
HALL-KIMBRELL CO-FOUNDER CHALLENGES EPA CHARGES
September 23, 1991
David Kimbrell hopes his testimony Tuesday before a congressional subcommittee will go a long way toward vindicating his former Lawrence company of the wrongdoing alleged in charges by the Environmental Protection Agency. Kimbrell, who co-founded Hall-Kimbrell Environmental Services and built the company into one of the nation’s largest asbestos inspection contractors, is one of several witnesses scheduled to appear before the Environment, Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee of the House Committee of Government Operations. That panel is investigating the EPA’s implementation of the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act, a 1986 law that required the inspection of all U.S. schools for asbestos.
COUNTY PLACES WEIGHT LIMIT ON 2 ROADS NEAR QUARRY SITE
September 23, 1991
The Douglas County Commission today approved a weight limit for two county roads to limit truck traffic near a quarry site, but two county residents still have questions about private roads that the quarry’s operator plans to put in. By a 2-0 vote, the commission approved setting a five-ton weight limit on County Road 050E from County Road 442 to U.S Highway 40 and also on County Road 1700N from County Road 442 to County Road 1023. Both roads are near the Shawnee County line in the western part of the county, near the site of the 720-acre Martin Marietta limestone quarry. The quarry is scheduled to open in 1994.
IT HAS TO STOP SOMEWHERE
September 23, 1991
Americans are increasingly disenchanted with our financial system which so often allows out-and-out crooks to retain vast amounts of their ill-gotten gain while the investors and depositors who created their obscene estates go begging. How often have we read about some bandit who has been exposed as a swindler or fraudulent operator but who continues to live well in a mansion with all the accoutrements, such as fancy cars and bonus payments, generated by his or her criminal activity? Why is it that there is no legal machinery to confiscate such wealth to pay off the trusting people who made it possible?
LOOK HOMEWARDANGEL!
September 23, 1991
There is a natural tendency for most Americans to note how people in parts of Europe, such as the disintegrating Soviet Union, are feeling the impact of communism’s failure, and for comfortable onlookers to sympathize and want to help in some way. Where possible and practical, we should extend a hand to such people to try to see that they have enough to wear and sufficient food and fuel for some of the hard times ahead.
ORGANIZATION HOLDS DEBATE OVER FULCHER
September 23, 1991
A debate between supporters and detractors of Kansas University Student Body President Darren Fulcher will be held at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Frontier Room of the Burge Union at Kansas University. The debate, sponsored by Audience Debate Forum, is the latest activity to be held in connection with controversy surrounding Fulcher.
EARLY ON, AGGIES APPEARED CAPABLE OF PULLING REPEAT SHOCKER OVER KU
September 23, 1991
It was late in the first quarter. Kansas and New Mexico State were tied 7-7 at Memorial Stadium. Would it happen again? Would New Mexico State repeat its stunning 42-29 victory over the Jayhawks during the 1988 season?
HASKELL STUDENT DIES FROM INJURIES
September 23, 1991
A memorial service was to be held today for a Haskell Indian Junior College student who died Sunday at the Kansas University Medical Center in Kansas City, Kan., after suffering injuries in a motorcycle accident. James Sorrell, 21, St. Ignatius, Mont., a second-year Haskell student, died at 5:05 p.m. Sunday at the medical center, a KUMC spokeswoman said.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE ENROLLMENT SOARS
September 23, 1991
More college students are studying foreign languages than ever before, with Japanese, Russian and Spanish showing the greatest growth in enrollment, according to a survey to be released this week by the Modern Language Association of America. The national growth in language study has been mirrored at Kansas University, say directors of KU foreign-language departments. More students are studying foreign languages because of their usefulness in many professions, they said.
ORGANIZATION OFFERS COUNSELING OPTIONS FOR VARIOUS NEEDS
September 23, 1991
Once a week, as she had done for the past year, Marjorie Fisher walks a few blocks from her home to her regular appointment at Catholic Social Service of Lawrence. It’s a short distance, but getting there has made a big difference in her life. Five years ago, Fisher, 63, moved to Lawrence to be near her family. Two weeks after she settled in, she bacame a victim of aggravated battery. Although she went for counseling for emotional wounds, Fisher felt she was not getting what she needed. That is, until someone told her about Catholic Social Service.
HOSPITAL REPORT
September 23, 1991
DISMISSALS Cody Rutledge, Lawrence.
HUSKERS FOLDED JUST LIKE AGGIES
September 23, 1991
No one would ever lump Nebraska and New Mexico State into the same football category. One is a perpetual contender, a shining star. The other is an opponent-for-hire, a punching bag. Yet Nebraska and New Mexico State had one thing in common Saturday. They both blew up.
KU RESEARCHER MERGES SCIENCEECONOMICS
September 23, 1991
Although Theodore “Ted” Kuwana has received both national and international recognition for his work in analytical chemistry, he admits that he devotes less time to his research than he might have in the past. That’s because Kuwana, regents distinguished professor of chemistry and pharmaceutical chemistry at Kansas University, also is heavily involved in seeking ways to translate scientific research findings into economic development for Kansas.
KU PROGRAM HOLDS PAYOFFS FOR STUDENTS
September 23, 1991
Kansas University students in this spring’s Washington, D.C., internship program had the first civilian briefing in the United States on Operation Desert Storm. “It was like you see in the movies big screens with flashing lights and high-ranking Air Force personnel,” said Robert Whittaker, who handles the Washington end of the program.
KU SEEKS MORE RESEARCH FUNDS
September 23, 1991
The $39.1 million in federal research funding awarded to Kansas institutions in 1989 might seem like nothing to sneeze at, unless one considers that nearby Midwest states of Iowa and Missouri received between $103 million and $150 million in research funding that same year. Kansas simply is not a strong competitor for federal research dollars, national funding data shows, but the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) is designed to change all that.