Archive for Tuesday, September 17, 1991

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BINGHAM SEEKS ALUMNI
September 17, 1991
Dave Bingham hasn’t alerted the Missing Person’s Bureau yet. Kansas’ baseball coach might eventually consider that option, however, as he searches for Chuck Dobson and Roger Slagle, the only former KU major leaguers who won’t be in town for Friday’s old-timers game at Hoglund-Maupin Stadium.
CHURCH SEEKS VARIANCE
September 17, 1991
To the Editor: We must express our disappointment at the Journal-World’s coverage of our church’s attempts to obtain site plan approval for our church adjacent to the proposed South Lawrence Trafficway. Contrary to your articles and recent editorial, we have not asked the county commission to move the trafficway. We are asking the commission to allow a variance of the 150-foot setback. In making this request, we presented evidence that a slight realignment of the route makes sense, will probably occur and strengthens our case for a variance in the setback distance. But we have not asked the commission to move the trafficway, nor is moving the trafficway required for them to approve our site plan.
LOCAL THRIFTS SHOW PROFIT FOR QUARTER
September 17, 1991
All five of the thrift institutions that have offices in Lawrence were profitable during the second quarter, although three of them fell short of meeting capital requirements. Reports released by the Office of Thrift Supervision for the April-June period showed that two federal savings banks, which had posted losses for the previous two quarters, returned to profitability during the second quarter.
LAWSUIT TARGETS MEETING FOR PEACE
September 17, 1991
A Lawrence motel has filed a lawsuit seeking $3,889 against the Meeting For Peace Foundation, a non-profit organization that hosted a Soviet-American people-to-people conference in Lawrence and other Kansas cities in October 1990. In the suit, filed in Douglas County District Court, the Westminster Inn, 2525 W. Sixth, is seeking to collect the amount it incurred in room rental fees for guests of the Meeting For Peace who stayed at the motel Oct. 10-18 in 1990.
TOPEKA CREW STARTS STEEP REPAIR WORK ON COURTHOUSE ROOF
September 17, 1991
In technical terms, the Douglas County courthouse roof is either an “18-12” or a “20-12,” say two roofing crew members describing the pitch of the roof that they began repairing Monday. “A `12-12’ would be a 45 degree angle,” said roofer Bruce Boyd of Vincent Roofing, Topeka. “So if you’re talking `18-12,’ it would be 60 degrees or so.”
LISA D. ATHEY
September 17, 1991
Graveside services for Lisa Dawn Athey, infant daughter of Shawn and Jerri Whitmill Athey, Lawrence, will be at 10 a.m. Wednesday at Memorial Park and Sunset Gardens Cemetery in Kansas City, Kan. The infant died Sunday, Sept. 15, 1991, at the Kansas University Medical Center in Kansas City, Kan.
ANNA M. HULL
September 17, 1991
Services for Anna Marie Hull, 65, Richmond, will be at 10 a.m. Thursday at Dengel & Son Mortuary here with the Rev. Bernard Lickteig officiating. Cremation is planned. Mrs. Hull died Monday, Sept. 16, 1991, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
MICHAEL GORDZICA
September 17, 1991
Services for Michael Gordzica, 72, Holmdel Township, N.J., will be at 9:15 a.m. Wednesday at St. Ann’s Roman Catholic Church in Keansburg, N.J. Mr. Gordzica died Friday, Sept. 13, 1991, at Bayshore Community Hospital in Holmdel.
CUBA MAY BE BURIED
September 17, 1991
For the time being, Cuba and China remain the last major bastions of communism. Cuba, long a major recipient on the handout list for the crumbling Soviet Union, might not retain its label for long. Already faced with growing financial crises of their own, the Soviets plan to bring home thousands of military forces from Cuba. President Mikhail Gorbachev indicates Moscow is in the process of severing any strong military ties to Havana. How much longer can the disastrous Soviet economy stand to provide any more handouts to Fidel Castro and Co.?
D.C. CURATOR DETAILS MYTHS OF THE WEST PRESENTED IN EXHIBIT
September 17, 1991
The art of the American West during the 19th century reflected a creation myth for the United States that included an exalted belief in progress, a museum director said Monday. “These images made the pioneers feel they were a part of a noble undertaking,” said Elizabeth Broun, director of the National Museum of American Art in Washington, D.C. “When things got difficult for them, it must have been comforting to feel you were a part of a national undertaking.”
KU RECRUIT KIDD CHOOSES CAL
September 17, 1991
There’s no place like home. Corny line in these parts, sure, but that pinpoints the philosophy of Alameda, Calif., St. Joseph’s senior guard Jason Kidd, who has decided to stay on the West coast to play his college basketball at Cal-Berkeley.
WILL BE, WELL, LATE THIS SEASON
September 17, 1991
Kansas University will once again hold a “Late Night With Roy Williams” to celebrate the start of the 1991-92 basketball season. Unlike past years, however, Williams’ fourth Late Night won’t take place at midnight Oct. 15, the first day teams can practice in accordance with NCAA rules.
JAZZ DUO TO PERFORM IN CITY
September 17, 1991
As jazz musician Dave Friesen was garnering a reputation in the West as a bass player, Uwe Kropinski was studying classical and jazz guitar in what was then East Germany. But Kropinski saw his future in the West, and after a chance meeting in Munich in 1987, Friesen and Kropinksi found a musical connection. Now the jazz duo will perform in a last-minute concert starting at 9:30 p.m. today at the Jazzhaus, 926 Mass.
COMMISSION BACKS SALE OF LIQUOR
September 17, 1991
The 40 or so people who attended Monday’s public hearing remained calm while discussing the controversial issue of whether to allow the sale of liquor by the drink on a Baldwin excursion dining train. After hearing comments from Baldwin residents for more than 1 hours, the Baldwin Planning Commission voted unanimously to recommend that the city allow the Prairie Pioneer Dinner Train to serve liquor.
HOSPITAL REPORT
September 17, 1991
DISMISSALS Penny Brecheisen and baby girl, Baldwin.
CITY ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR WEATHERIZATION PROGRAM
September 17, 1991
Lawrence families on tight budgets can have their homes weatherized for free in time for winter, acccording to Larry Hamm, rehabilitation coordinator for city’s Community Development department. Low-income homeowners can receive free weather stripping, storm windows and attic insulation if they meet income guidelines set by the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, which funds the program.
HAROLD V. WORKMAN
September 17, 1991
Services for Harold V. Workman, 74, Lawrence, will be at 10 a.m. Thursday at Warren-McElwain Mortuary with the Rev. Virgil Brady and the Ottawa Masonic Lodge No. 18 in charge of services. Burial will be in Memorial Park Cemetery with military honors by Dorsey-Liberty Post No. 14 of the American Legion. Mr. Workman died Monday, Sept. 16, 1991, at St. Francis Hospital in Topeka.
NEW CENTER TO SHARE MATERIALS ON AIDS
September 17, 1991
After about a year of assessing what the area’s needs were, DCCCA’s resource center on AIDS and human sexuality is up and running, the staff member in charge of the center said today. Heather Drake, who was hired to coordinate the center, said materials about AIDS and human sexuality have been purchased and are now available. Drake said the center’s No. 1 priority is to make materials available for schools in the eight counties the center serves.
DAVID A. HAYNES
September 17, 1991
Graveside services for David A. Haynes, 87, Perry, will be at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Perry, with the Rev. James Bailey officiating. Mr. Haynes was found dead of natural causes Sunday, Sept. 15, 1991, at his home. He was a farmer.
KUMC PHYSICIANS CREATE SUBSTITUTE BLADDERS
September 17, 1991
One of the first things Renee Lynn did after Kansas University Medical Center physicians created a substitute bladder for her was quit her job. Lynn, a 20-year-old DeSoto resident, was born with spina bifida, a congenital condition in which the vertabrae do not close completely. Before her surgery, she said, she worked for her father because she didn’t feel she could work in a public setting.
COUNTY TO HEAR RURAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN
September 17, 1991
The Douglas County Commission on Wednesday will hear back from a Lawrence-Douglas County Planning Commission committee on the results of public hearings on the county’s “Rural Development Planning Report.” Dan Rockhill, chairman of the committee that worked on the report, said the committee has modified some of its original report based on public input. Although Rockhill expects the committee to sign off on the report at the meeting, he said the public will have two other chances to offer comment at public hearings with the planning commission and then with the county commission.
EX-GANNETT EXECUTIVE WINS AWARD
September 17, 1991
A news executive whose colleagues dubbed him “the conscience of Gannett” is the ninth winner of the Ida B. Wells Award for achievement in hiring and advancing minorities in news media, according to Samuel Adams, curator of the award and associate professor of journalism at the Kansas University. John C. Quinn, who for two decades was chief news executive at Gannett Co. Inc., the nation’s largest news conglomerate, is credited with leading the news industry in developing minority managers and mainstreaming minorities as news sources and journalists.
JORDAN T. PHILLIPS
September 17, 1991
Services are pending for Jordan Taylor Phillips, infant son of Rod and Cindy Madl Phillips, Columbia, Mo., formerly of Baldwin. Jordan was stillborn Monday, Sept. 16, 1991, at University Hospital in Columbia. Lamb-Roberts Funeral Home in Baldwin is handling arrangements.
REVIEW BOARD STILL WORKING ON REPORT
September 17, 1991
A review board’s recommendations concerning Lawrence Police Department policies will be released a few weeks later than planned, according to the board’s chairman. “We’re not going to meet the deadline we set for ourselves,” Chairman Darrel Stephens said. “But that’s not unusual for a project like this, where everyone involved has other, full-time responsibilities.”
NUMBERS LOW IN BOYS GYMNASTICS
September 17, 1991
There’s plenty of quality but not much quantity in Lawrence High boys gymnastics. The same can be said throughout the state. Lawrence has one of only two high school teams in Kansas, and the Lions have only six gymnasts.
September 17, 1991
Forced to cope with a law that requires open admissions to state universities, Kansas University schools and departments are looking at other ways to limit enrollments. Admission standards have been established in KU’s professional schools and, most recently, in departments in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
FOR THE RECORD
September 17, 1991
Injury accidents Kathlyn M. Jones, 55, Baldwin, is in fair condition today at Lawrence Memorial Hospital where she was taken by the Douglas County Ambulance Service after an accident at about 5 p.m. Monday. Jones was driving south on Douglas County Road 1055, about three-tenths of a mile north of the Franklin County line when she drove off the road, sheriff’s officers reported. Her car slid off the right side of the road, and Jones lost control, striking a field access drive. Jones’ car then went airborne and landed in a ditch.
T LURING HOME BUYERS
September 17, 1991
Potential home buyers are playing hard to get, despite rock-bottom interest rates which, in other economic times, might have triggered a boom in mortgage originations. That’s the assessment of local mortgage lenders, many of whom are puzzled by the ho-hum attitude the market is taking toward the steadily declining interest rates.
LEAGUE SERIES TO FOCUS ON CITY LAND USE
September 17, 1991
Land use around the city and its impact on local life will be discussed in a series of informational meetings sponsored this month and in October by the League of Women Voters of Lawrence. The meeting series, titled “Land Use-Land Useless: Will We Get The City We Deserve?” is designed so that league members who have studied land-use policies for decades can share their expertise with other league members and with the public.
SETTLEMENT TO CLEAR PATH FOR HOCH
September 17, 1991
Kansas University officials say they are close to a settlement that will free up money to pay for clearing debris from fire-ravaged Hoch Auditorium. Since Hoch was gutted by fire in June, KU has been working to reallocate $250,000 to $300,000 that originally was budgeted for a new roof for the historic auditorium.
OREGON TRANSFER EXCELLING AT KU
September 17, 1991
Happy at Oregon University, Julia Saul reluctantly waved goodbye to the Great Northwest. “There were program cuts. They cut the entire education department,” said Saul, a cross country standout planning a major in health education.