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Archive for Friday, September 6, 1991

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September 6, 1991
An autopsy did not determine the cause of death of a 44-year-old Lawrence man who was found Wednesday afternoon in his home. “The autopsy was inconclusive,” about the cause of Joseph M. Boyer’s death, said Dr. Alan Sanders, Douglas County coroner.
BAND APPRECIATES SUPPORT
September 6, 1991
To the Editor: The members of the Kansas Army National Guard Band wish to express their appreciation to the citizens of Tonganoxie for the warm reception during our recent performance in that community.
STAR POWER
September 6, 1991
To the Editor: Followed by a major news story, there it was a poll on who the best looking celebrities of America were. And not to my surprise, they were all household names. It dawned on me that celebrities have more influence on our lives than anyone. I will be the first to admit that I would probably buy swamp land from Dustin Hoffman if he came to my door selling it. My point is this, our afternoon soap stars seem to have more influence on us than our friends and family do.
JUST SAY NOPLEASE!
September 6, 1991
Soviet space officials, like everyone else in that nation, have felt the impact of their country’s turmoil and say they are expecting more negative repercussions. Now they have told the White House the cash-hungry space program may collapse unless it makes large sales to the West. So what? Almost everything, the Soviet officials say, is on the table, even the space station Mir, now circling 240 miles above the earth. Recently, two Soviet astronauts aboard the space station helped to make money for the ailing program by sipping Coca-Cola in an experiment for the company.
LEGACY
September 6, 1991
Critics of the late Frank Capra often had to work overtime to find ways to demean the work of the outstanding film and television director who just died at the age of 94. “Capra-corn,” detractors frequently have labeled some of his more popular works, such as “It’s a Wonderful Life.” But one can’t help wondering if the nation wouldn’t be at least a little better off these days if there had been more Capra productions on the screens and fewer of the lusty, bloody-and-gutsy and totally tasteless “productions” which the movie-going public too frequently has been dealt since Capra’s heydey.
September 6, 1991
Two years ago, Mike Schwartz and John Mier played on the Lawrence High soccer team along with just two seniors. This year, Schwartz and Mier, the Lions’ co-captains, are two of 16 seniors on the LHS squad.
CROSS COUNTRY OPENS YEAR IN MANHATTAN BOYS, GIRLS CHASING NORTHWEST
September 6, 1991
Steve Sublett did a little recruiting last spring not night after night on the road watching players at Nike camps, but in the city’s junior high schools. “We have 33 out,” said Sublett, Lawrence High’s boys cross country coach. “That’s probably up 10 from what we’ve had on an average. One of the reasons for that is I spent some time in the junior highs. I’ve always extended the invitation, but this is the first time I’ve worked at it.”
BODYBUILDER GRANTED PROBATION
September 6, 1991
A local fitness club owner and bodybuilder was granted a one-year probation term today in Douglas County District Court for possessing anabolic steroids. Richard “Junkyard” Sells, 39, owner of Junkyard’s Jym & Nautilus Center, 535 Gateway Dr., was arrested Jan. 3 after making a transaction involving anabolic steroids with a confidential informant working for the Kansas Bureau of Investigation. He was charged the same day with a felony count of possessing steroids.
TRAFFICWAY CONCERNS ABOUND
September 6, 1991
Douglas County officials came looking for input on the South Lawrence Trafficway on Thursday night, and the public was happy to oblige. About 80 county residents attended a three-hour preliminary design meeting for the trafficway at the county courthouse. The meeting also featured project details from county officials and engineers from two of the consulting firms working on the trafficway.
KAWS HAVE RARE DEPTH THIS SEASON
September 6, 1991
Perry-Lecompton High football coach Armin Landis said he wouldn’t start betting on the Kaws. Yet. “It’s always kind of a crap shoot,” he said. “So far, though, we’ve been pleasantly surprised in the level of commitment.”
MARIE M. SWOYER
September 6, 1991
Services for Marie M. Campbell Swoyer, 88, Oskaloosa, will be at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at the United Methodist Church in Oskaloosa with the Rev. Wayne S. Feuerbacher officiating. Burial will be in Pleasant View Cemetery in Oskaloosa. Mrs. Swoyer died Thursday, Sept. 5, 1991, at her home. She had cancer.
TUCKER SERVICES
September 6, 1991
Services for Viola V. Tucker, 83, Lawrence, will be at 10 a.m. Monday at Warren-McElwain Mortuary, with the Rev. Bill Clendineng officiating. Burial will be in Oak Hill Cemetery. Mrs. Tucker died Thursday, Sept. 5, 1991, at the Valley View Care Home in Lawrence.
POLICE CONTINUE TO INVESTIGATE OAK HILL DAMAGE
September 6, 1991
Local police seeking leads in vandalism at cemetery Lawrence police detectives say they have not yet been able to find out who knocked over or damaged 175 grave markers last weekend at Oak Hill Cemetery in eastern Lawrence.
LOWER SCORES HELP ROGERS ENJOY GOLFING
September 6, 1991
Practice, practice, practice. It’s made Jenny Rogers the golfer she is today. Rogers, a senior on Lawrence High’s girls’ golf team, shot a 56 in the Lions’ nine-hole season opener Thursday at Alvamar.
KANSAS UNION A HUB OF CAMPUS ACTIVITY
September 6, 1991
For its distinct skyline, Kansas University relies on Fraser Hall and the Campanile. For national attention, action at Allen Fieldhouse and Memorial Stadium provide streams of highlight film. But for day-in, day-out service to students, no building on campus compares to the Kansas Union on Jayhawk Boulevard.
GROUP MEETS TO SET SCHOOL GOALS
September 6, 1991
About 40 local educators, businessmen and government officials began a two-day retreat this morning to establish some guidelines for what skills students should acquire while attending the Lawrence school district. “The major purpose of this retreat is to develop a preliminary draft of `exit outcomes,’ which … explain what we want our students to know, to be able to do and to be like when they leave the Lawrence Public Schools,” Lawrence School Supt. Dan Neuenswander wrote in a letter to the people invited to the retreat, which is taking place at the Lawerence Holidome.
FOR THE RECORD
September 6, 1991
Law enforcement report Condition reports
POLICE ARREST ARSON SUSPECT
September 6, 1991
A 38-year-old Lawrence man was arrested Thursday on two counts of aggravated arson in connection with two fires this week, Lawrence Police Sgt. Ed Brunt said. Witnesses had told fire investigation squad detectives that they had seen the man in the area of the EZ Shop convenience store, 1414 W. Sixth, after a fire about 7 p.m. Tuesday in the men’s restroom there. The man also was seen in the area of the Easy Wash Laundry, 1215 W. Sixth, following a fire in the women’s restroom at about 6 p.m. Wednesday night.
T WORK WITH THE SYSTEMS
September 6, 1991
With links all across campus, Kansas University’s Computing Services department has built its own network of necessity and one that reaches far beyond Mount Oread. Computing Services offers two areas of service, from the more visible use of computers for academic work involving research and instruction to the more behind-the-scenes systems and programs that keep the university operating.
MEETING FOCUSES ON RACE PROBLEMS
September 6, 1991
The president of Haskell Indian Junior College told members of the Lawrence-Douglas County League of Women Voters that the college should take the lead in trying to mend strained relations between local Native Americans and the city. “We are an Indian college, and we should provide leadership in educating people in regards to Native Americans and the Native American culture,” Haskell President Bob Martin said at the league’s meeting Thursday evening. “There are problems in Lawrence, and we should help to bring those to the surface.”
CRASH VICTIM IS A SUSPECT IN BANK THEFTS
September 6, 1991
Law enforcement authorities said today that they think a man who was seriously injured in a traffic accident early today in the Kansas City area may be the man who committed two robberies at the Wellsville Bank and one at a bank in Missouri during the last month. They also think he is the same man who robbed a Louisburg, Kan., drugstore with a double-barrelled shotgun Thursday afternoon, taking drugs and cash.
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES WORKING TO MAKE LIFE EASIER FOR STUDENTS
September 6, 1991
You’ve had a busy half-day of classes at Kansas University when suddenly you remember that, in less than 30 minutes, you’re scheduled to enroll for next semester. However, instead of heading for a long line of enrollees in Strong Hall, you schedule your classes in comfortable solitude at Watson Library, the Computer Center or even your own home.
CITY TO MULL BUSINESS TAX PLAN
September 6, 1991
The Lawrence City Commission Tuesday will consider giving final approval to a new tax abatement policy it reviewed last month. The proposal was presented by the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce’s Property Tax Incentives Task Force during the commission’s Aug. 13 meeting. The commissioners approved most of the 28-section report but suggested a few minor changes.
TWO KU STUDENTS RECEIVE AWARDS
September 6, 1991
Two Kansas University students from the St. Louis area have received academic scholarships from KU’s School of Architecture and Urban Design. John C. Houser, fifth-year architecture student, received the $6,000 1991-92 Ranft Scholarship offered by the American Institute of Architects, St. Louis chapter.
S SCHOOLS COUNT AN ENROLLMENT RECORD
September 6, 1991
Lawrence school officials this morning announced an unofficial districtwide enrollment of 9,009 students, an increase of 184 students over the official enrollment of 8,825 reported on Sept. 20 last year. This year’s unofficial total would be a record for city schools.
PRISON ORDERED IN KU BOMBING
September 6, 1991
A 20-year-old Lawrence man was sentenced today to 21 months in federal prison in connection with a bombing incident on the Kansas University campus in March. Joseph N. Ceresko also was ordered to pay $452 in restitution at his sentencing in federal court in Topeka. He was charged with using explosives at an institution receiving federal funds.
HASKELL TO HOST AGING SYMPOSIUM
September 6, 1991
The Gerontology Center at Kansas University and the Gerontological Society of America are sponsoring a symposium next week on Native American aging. The symposium, which will be open to the public, will address Indian aging issues and opportunities. According to a news release from the Gerontological Society, Native Americans are one of the fastest-growing elderly populations in the United States. The symposium was organized to introduce students to the range of opportunities in the medical and social sciences and social services.
NEW CLASS EMPHASIZES MINORITY SUCCESS
September 6, 1991
Leadership requires taking risks, using power wisely, communicating effectively and other attributes, according to Kansas University’s minority affairs director who teaches a new leadership class. “We’re trying to develop a sense of confidence with the students and a sense of familiarity with the KU environment,” said Sherwood Thompson, director of the office of minority affairs. “Hopefully, the students will be able to go back home and convey a positive message to other minorities about KU.”
S PERFORMANCE IS SHORT ON IMPROV BUT LONG ON LAUGHS
September 6, 1991
S REQUEST FOR NEW LICENSE DENIED
September 6, 1991
When it was all said and done, the city’s criticism of a local private club wasn’t an issue in a decision to deny the club’s request for a different kind of license. Instead, Robert Engler, director of the state’s Alcoholic Beverage Control division, said in an order this week that the Power Plant, 901 Miss., wouldn’t receive a drinking establishment license because he wasn’t convinced the club could meet a food sales requirement.
PROGRAM
September 6, 1991
Carl Locke, dean of the Kansas University School of Engineering, is not shy about praising his students. “I believe we have the finest students on campus,” said Locke, basing his assessment on average ACT scores.
ABORTION FOCUS OF RADIO SHOW
September 6, 1991
Abortion supporters and opponents squared off Thursday in a national live radio call-in program that was a response to six weeks of abortion protests in Wichita that led to nearly 2,700 arrests. The two-hour program, “Choosing Sides: A Live Radio Forum on Abortion,” featured representatives of both sides of the controversy as well as legal, medical and ethics experts. It was co-produced by Lawrence public radio station KANU-FM and KCUR, the public radio station in Kansas City, Mo.
UNIVERSITY COUNCIL BLASTS MISSION STATEMENT
September 6, 1991
A Kansas University goverance group Thursday condemned a proposed mission statement for the Kansas Board of Regents system because it suggests regents intend to usurp the authority of individual universities. “There is the perception of control, centralization, within the regents office in Topeka,” said Tom Beisecker, a member of University Council and chair of University Senate Executive Committee.
CHILD ADVOCATE EXPERT TO SHARE IDEAS ON RAISING CAPABLE YOUTH
September 6, 1991
A California psychologist who is an honorary Kansan will be in Lawrence later this month, dispensing advice to parents and teachers on how to improve their relationships with their children and students. The psychologist, H. Stephen Glenn, was named an honorary Kansan for his work on the Kansas School Team Training program since its inception in 1981. He is nationally recognized as an expert in family relations.
UT TO PAY DEARLY FOR KANSAS VISIT
September 6, 1991
Thanks to Jamie Farr who played the often skirt-clad Klinger on the long-running TV series M*A*S*H, Toledo is famous. So are the Mud Hens, Toledo’s uniquely nicknamed minor league baseball team. Who, too, hasn’t weighed something on a Toledo scale? Or heard someone utter the second-most famous Holy cry (after Cow)?
MEDICAL SCHOOL DEAN EYES RECRUITMENT, FUNDING GOALS
September 6, 1991
For Dr. James Price, medicine seemed a natural fit. The product of a small town, Price was impressed early on by his contact with doctors, and he was intrigued by science.
BUSINESSMAN HOPES TO BUILD TIES DURING TRIP TO SOVIET UNION
September 6, 1991
Lawrence resident George Paley is having trouble containing his excitement about an upcoming business trip to the Soviet Union and the independent Baltic republics a journey that shows greater promise in post-coup times. Paley, owner of Natural Way Natural Fiber Clothing, 820 Mass., will leave for the Soviet Union on Saturday with a Milwaukee, Wis., business associate who emigrated from Leningrad two years ago.
HALL CENTER DIRECTORS DISCUSS PROGRAMS
September 6, 1991
The director of the Joyce and Elizabeth Hall Center for the Humanities at Kansas University defines the center’s purpose succinctly. “Our main mission is faculty development,” explains Andrew Debicki, who is in his third year as Hall Center director. “When I came in here two years ago, that’s what I came in to do.”
SYMPOSIUM TO FOCUS ON DAKOTA AQUIFIER
September 6, 1991
As water supplies grow more scarce in western Kansas, an increasingly important water source may prove to be the Dakota aquifer. This fall, water experts from across the state will meet at Kansas University to discuss current research on the Dakota aquifer in a symposium sponsored by the Kansas Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Kansas geology department.
DELBERT S. WILSON
September 6, 1991
Services for Delbert S. Wilson, 88, Lawrence, are pending at Warren-McElwain Mortuary. Mr. Wilson died this morning, Sept. 6, 1991, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital. He was born Oct. 7, 1902, at Valley Falls.