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Archive for Sunday, October 27, 1991

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EASY ACCESS TO GUNS
October 27, 1991
Just whose civil rights would be abridged by legal action which would prevent giving any Tom, Dick or Harriett easy access to a 9mm Glock semiautomatic pistol like the one used recently to kill 23 innocent people at a Killeen, Tex., cafeteria? The killer was 35-year-old George Henard, who seemed to be angry at just about everyone and took it out on an unsuspecting lunchtime crowd. It is rated the nation’s worst mass murder. Pro-gun lobbyists contend it was a person, not a weapon, that created the tragedy. But suppose the person had not been able to acquire his killing machine so simply.
HIPPIE BOOK
October 27, 1991
Back in the 1960s, some people decided to say “no” to convention and “yes” to pleasure. That meant dropping societal taboos against sexual freedom and drugs and setting up a new kind of communal order where you could “do your own thing.” The hippies, as they were called, were widely lampooned in the media, including the Peter Sellars film “I Love You, Alice B. Toklas” and the TV show “Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In.” But at the heart of their movement, as portrayed in their own underground presses, there was a search for better ways for humans to live.
S STORY PUBLISHED
October 27, 1991
A magazine in the model circus builders exhibit last weekend at Baldwin’s Maple Leaf Festival featured the story of a former Baldwin resident, C.W. “Andy” Anderson, and his association with the circus world. The story, collected by Baldwin resident Becky McMillen, told of Anderson’s work as an advance man for several circuses in the 1920s. Anderson wrote the piece while a resident at Baldwin’s Orchard Lane Nursing Facility, where Mrs. McMillen gives storytelling programs.
SAYING GOOD-BYE TO THE KING OF COOL
October 27, 1991
With the passing of Miles Dewey Davis on Sept. 28, 1991, the world of post-war modern jazz lost one of its most important voices. Born in East St. Louis, Ill., on May 25, 1926, Davis left an upper middle-class home to seek his fortune as an 18-year-old jazz trumpeter in New York City in 1944. His specific quest was to find his idol, the mercurial bebop alto saxophonist from Kansas City then turning the Big Apple’s music scene upside down, Charlie “Bird” Parker. The neophyte impressed Bird more by the intensity of his desire than the state of his musicianship, and from 1945 through 1948, Davis apprenticed with Parker onstage and in the recording studio. Though limited in range and technique in comparison to bebop’s leading trumpet stars, Dizzy Gillespie and Fats Navarro, Davis, in spite of being rapped by critics and peers, was forging a sound and improvisational approach all his own.
YOUNG ENTREPRENEUR PEGS NICHE WITH BIODEGRADEABLE TEE FOR GOLF
October 27, 1991
Although a meeting is being conducted at Kansas University this weekend for college-age entrepreneurs from six states, one of the nation’s most successful young businessmen is in town for another reason. Casey Golden, 13, Golden, Colo., inventor of a biodegradable golf tee, has come to Lawrence to visit his sister, Kerry, a freshman at KU.
RESIDENTS CALL FOR REFORMS
October 27, 1991
It’s time for sweeping health care reform in the United States, a sampling of Lawrence residents said in recent on-the-street interviews downtown. “I definitely think it’s time for a major overhaul,” said Jennifer Kimball-Brown, who had difficulty getting insurance because of previous health problems.
AMY NEWELL
October 27, 1991
Services for Amy Newell, 24, Breckenridge, Colo., formerly of Valley Falls, will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday at the United Methodist Church, Valley Falls. Burial will be at Valley Falls Cemetery. Miss Newell died Friday, Oct. 25, 1991, in Boulder, Colo., after suffering a seizure at the home of a friend.
GLENN SHOEMAKER
October 27, 1991
Services for Glenn Raymond Shoemaker, 81, Copan, were Thursday at the Copan Baptist Church with the Rev. David Head officiating. Burial was in Sunnyside Cemetery in Caney, Kan. Mr. Shoemaker died Monday, Oct. 21, 1991.
LHS WINS REGIONAL VOLLEYBALL
October 27, 1991
Please pardon Jill Oelschlager if she occasionally drills an opponent during pre-game spike drills. Really, she doesn’t mean any harm. Well, not much anyway.
LION RUNNERS MAKE STATE
October 27, 1991
Lawrence High will be well represented at the state cross country meet. The Lions’ boys and girls each finished second at the regional meet Saturday at Shawnee North Community Center and earned berths at state next Saturday at Manhattan.
LISTENING TO THE FOLKS BACK HOME
October 27, 1991
The swearing-in last week of Clarence Thomas as the 106th Supreme Court justice didn’t end complaints by Kansans to their U.S. senators. Some local residents who tried to make telephone calls to their senators during Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas’s confirmation proceedings were frustrated the phone lines were jammed.
SANDS WANTED WIN WITH RECORD
October 27, 1991
On a day when Tony Sands achieved a monumental milestone, he could barely muster a smile. Kansas’ senior tailback became the Jayhawks’ career rushing leader here Saturday, but it occurred in a 41-3 Oklahoma burial.
ISSUES
October 27, 1991
Providing for the needs of children across the state and in Douglas County will be the focus of a conference that is expected to draw as many as 150 participants this week in Lawrence. The daylong conference, titled “Our Children … Our Future,” is to be held Tuesday at the Lawrence Holidome, 200 McDonald Dr.
A GROWING PROBLEM
October 27, 1991
Judy Eyerly is eager to see the agency she directs close its doors. Eyerly, director of Health Care Access, a non-profit agency that provides health care for Douglas County residents who can’t afford it, said the agency’s No. 1 goal since it opened in June 1989 has been to close.
CONTRACTUAL SNAG KEEPS STUDENTS AWAY FROM THEIR SCHOLARSHIP HALL
October 27, 1991
Construction of a new Kansas University scholarship hall is right on schedule, but about 50 residents of another hall that is being renovated still are waiting to move back into the building, a KU official said. Ken Stoner, director of student housing, said the residents of Pearson Scholarship Hall are standing by for a construction crew to complete renovation that began this spring on the building.
EUDORAN ARRESTED ON DRUG CHARGES
October 27, 1991
A 35-year-old Eudora man was arrested on several drug-related charges Saturday following a two-month long investigation, Lawrence police said. Officers of the Lawrence-Douglas County Drug Enforcement Unit and a Eudora police officer arrested the man at 2:30 p.m. Saturday in Eudora on a warrant containing two counts of selling cocaine and two counts of not placing a Kansas drug tax stamp on cocaine, police said.
WOMAN FILES SUIT AGAINST DEVELOPER
October 27, 1991
A local real estate developer is being sued by a Lawrence woman who says she was injured in an accident at one of his properties. Zona Smith, age not listed, filed a suit in Douglas County District Court claiming the developer, John McGrew, was negligent because he failed to maintain property at 745 N.H. in a safe condition and failed to properly warn her about a dangerous condition.
SUIT
October 27, 1991
A Lawrence police officer has denied he was negligent in a 1989 traffic accident for which he and the city are being sued. Gerald Cooley, attorney for the city, denied in an answer to the suit that Lawrence police officer James R. Winn was negligent when his police car was struck by an automobile driven by Teresa A. Salb on Oct. 30, 1989, at 11th and Massachusetts streets. She filed suit in Douglas County District Court against Winn and the city, seeking damages in excess of $50,000.
INDIA SCHOOL ACCESS HIGHLIGHTS BOARD AGENDA
October 27, 1991
Two weeks after residents near India Elementary School expressed concern about plans to end busing to India, the Lawrence school board Monday will discuss options for providing students access to the school. The district provides busing to India, 1701 E. 23rd, because the only access to the school is off 23rd Street, or Kansas Highway 10.
S PLAN RAISES FEARS OF SEVERAL BAR OWNERS
October 27, 1991
Owners of several Lawrence watering holes are worried about proposed changes in city laws that they think could unjustly stop their taps and eventually close their doors. The changes would give the Lawrence City Commission the authority to revoke the city liquor license of a private club or drinking establishment, which would pull the plug on its livelihood.
WHAT THE CITY PROPOSAL SAYS
October 27, 1991
The proposed changes in city laws concerning drinking establishments and private clubs are designed to allow the city commission to revoke or suspend the licenses of such businesses that harm public safety and welfare. The city commission could revoke or suspend a liquor license for several reasons, including:
October 27, 1991
Movement, text, younger dancers, older dancers, music, art and politics all are at the disposal of Washington, D.C., choreographer Liz Lerman. In her latest work, “The Good Jew?”, she explores what it means to be a Jew and what it means to be Liz Lerman.
GIVING OFFICE SUPPLIES A NEW LEASE ON LIFE
October 27, 1991
When entrepreneurs began scanning the recycling horizon in search of new markets, it was only a matter of time before they identified the office as the latest frontier. As high-volume producers of waste paper, offices were a natural target for recycling. Spread sheets and shredded paper, having been transformed into a commodity, now bypass the waste basket in favor of the recycler. By the same token, office supply consumers now have a plethora of recycled paper products to choose from.
NOTES AND QUOTES. . .
October 27, 1991
Notes and quotes while wondering if an NBA season lasts longer than the gestation period of an elephant… With the Metrodome the site of the World Series this month, the Super Bowl next January and the NCAA Final Four next April, I sure wish I owned a motel in downtown Minneapolis. How many other cities have hosted those three blockbuster events within a six-month period? …
FINDS FORMAT SUCCESSFUL
October 27, 1991
South Park Recreation Center, filled with bird feeders, compost materials and a kestral, turned into a nature haven Saturday during the Jayhawk Audubon Society’s Eco-Fair. Joyce Wolf, conservation chairwoman for the society, said the group decided to expand its fall birdseed sale by bringing other organizations to the Eco-Fair. In addition to the Audubon Society, which has a local membership about 400, other groups represented were the Wildcare wildlife rehabilitation center at Kansas University, Community Living Opportunities and the Master Gardener program at the Douglas County Extension Service. The city also provided a drop-off bin for recycling newspapers.
COUNTY TO DISCUSS LAWSUITSALARIES
October 27, 1991
Douglas County commissioners Monday again will try to decide what road to follow in the wake of an appeals court ruling against the county over the South Lawrence Trafficway. The commission is scheduled to meet in executive session with Bob Fairchild, county counsel, to discuss a lawsuit over issuance of bonds for the trafficway. The suit was brought by Lawrence residents Leslie W. Blevins Sr. and Tim Miller and county resident Patty Boyer.
ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT PERMEATES KU CONFERENCE
October 27, 1991
Although recession has made the ‘90s a difficult time to start a business, more people are taking that risk now than ever before, a successful Lawrence businessman told a crowd of would-be entrepreneurs Saturday. The “security blanket” many employees used to enjoy has disappeared as companies continue to downsize their workforces, said Robert Johnson Sr., president of Charlton Manley Inc., 211 E. Eighth, and the Lawrence Chamber of Commerce Businessman of the Year.
SAILING AWAY TO A PACIFIC PARADISE
October 27, 1991
The paintings and photographs were created thousands of miles away from the United States by artists on an island with its own distinctive environment. And yet some of the same concerns American artists brought to the U.S. environment show up in works by the painters and photographers in New Zealand, itself a former British colony.
JAYHAWKS JUST WHAT OU NEEDED
October 27, 1991
Oklahoma swallowed one dose of Kansas, and won’t have to call the doctor in the morning. Not only was KU medicine effective, it worked quickly.
CIRCUS MINIATURES
October 27, 1991
In the bombastic world of circuses, where everything is “the biggest, grandest and most stupendous ever,” the tiny model circuses on exhibit last weekend at the Maple Leaf Festival presented quite a counterpoint. They offer a mirror, though, on what has become the stuff of museums the circus world of yesteryear.
LOCAL CONGRESSMEN BERATE PROPOSALS TO CUT FEDERAL TAXES
October 27, 1991
Two Kansas congressional members say they don’t think much of tax cut proposals for the middle class revealed last week and they don’t think the ideas will get very far. And a pair of Kansas University professors say the tax cut plans seem motivated more by politics than by any hope of improving the economy.
BAKER STUMBLES AGAINST JEWELL
October 27, 1991
Baker and William Jewell were ready to rumble, as well as fumble, on Saturday. The Wildcats coughed up the ball four times in their 28-20 loss at Greene Memorial Stadium, but it was their final giveaway that proved to be the most costly.