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Archive for Friday, May 24, 1991

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JAMIE LYNN STILES
May 24, 1991
Memorial services for Jamie Lynn Stiles, 36, Washington, D.C., will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday at the First United Methodist Church in Lawrence with the Rev. Virgil Brady officiating. Private inurnment services will be in Oak Hill Cemetery. Mr. Stiles died Thursday, May 23, 1991, from complications of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
TENANTS AIR GRIPES ABOUT APARTMENTS TO HUD DIRECTOR
May 24, 1991
Since last fall, Anna Patterson says, she has had to choose between sleeping soundly or getting a good night’s sleep. Because the smoke detector in her apartment at Vermont Towers “goes off all the time,” she explained, she has to choose between leaving it turned on and being awakened four or five times each night by its raucous buzzing or turning it off and hoping fire doesn’t break out.
S RAID UNVEILED
May 24, 1991
When William Clarke Quantrill and his band of pro-slavery raiders launched an attack on Lawrence in August 1863, they shot and killed virtually every man in sight. However, Quantrill showed favor to residents in the Eldridge Hotel and accompanied them to safety. Until recently, historians knew that Quantrill led the guests to the Whitney House, also known as the City Hotel, located at what is now the intersection of Sixth and Massachusetts. However, nobody understood why.
REPORT
May 24, 1991
The wheat crop continues to progress ahead of schedule, but a shortage of moisture is causing the crop’s condition to decline, according to Kansas Agricultural Statistics, the Kansas State University Extension Service and the National Weather Service. Ninety-five percent of the crop currently is heading, compared with 70 percent last year and the average for this date of 85 percent. The condition of the wheat crop is rated 41 percent good to excellent, 38 percent fair, and 21 percent poor to very poor. Most of the wheat rated poor to very poor is located in western and south central counties where moisture continues to be short.
SCHOOLS CONSIDER WAYS TO CUT COSTS
May 24, 1991
The Lawrence school board on Thursday began looking at ways to deal with an expected $2.7 million drop in state aid to the district, expressing serious doubts that the Kansas Legislature could override Gov. Joan Finney’s veto of a bill that would provide those and other funds to the district. Instituting fees for bus transportation, closing small elementary schools and cutting special programs are among moves the board is considering to cope with the budgetary blow.
CITY COMMISSION CONTINUES TO PRIORITIZE CONCERNS
May 24, 1991
A list of ideas will move closer to becoming official goals of the Lawrence City Commission at its meeting Tuesday. Last month, the new commission set down and began prioritizing a list of about 15 items thought important by individual members. On Tuesday, that list again will be discussed, revised and further prioritized. The result could give Lawrence an idea what direction the recently elected commission wants to take it.
SCHOOLS CONSIDER WAYS TO CUT COSTS
May 24, 1991
enrollment growth of 250 students, and to provide negotiated salary increases for veteran teachers, an estimated 3.25 mill-levy increase would be needed beyond the 12-13 mill-levy increase. Making up funding cuts for transportation and mandated special education programs also could require another 1.25 mills.
BETTER
May 24, 1991
Too bad baseball games aren’t scheduled for 12 innings. Or 15. Still, the Maupintour Travellers’ philosophy is simple: The longer they play, the better their chance of winning.
MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY TO CLOSE MANY OFFICES
May 24, 1991
Many local governmental offices will close their doors Monday in honor of Memorial Day. The day will be a time for outdoor activities because all local recreation centers the Lawrence Community Building, Holcom Park Recreation Center, South Park Recreation Center and East Lawrence Recreation Center will be closed Monday.
LECOMPTON LOSSES 2 COUNCIL MEMBERS
May 24, 1991
The resignation of Lecompton’s mayor and a council member were unrelated and in no way caused by turmoil within the city government, said the former mayor, who stepped down this week. Bill Reynolds, who was elected to his third two-year term as mayor at the April 2 general election, and Leo Pollard, a council member who has served about one year, resigned at Monday’s city council meeting.
SOLDIER GLAD TO BE BACK AT SCHOOL
May 24, 1991
Small things don’t seem to bother Jim Pilch Jr. as much these days as they once did. Of course, being pulled out of Kansas University when his U.S. Army Reserve unit was activated in November, spending four months in Saudi Arabia during the Persian Gulf War and surviving a Scud missile attack his first night overseas, will change a person’s perspective.
T BE IDLE
May 24, 1991
Several Kansas basketball players will be gaining on-court experience this summer. No official announcment has been made, but junior guard Adonis Jordan will be invited to tryouts for the U.S. World University Games team that will play in an international tournament just outside of London, England, in late July.
S WALKER, WILDEY FALL
May 24, 1991
Kansas seniors Chris Walker and Craig Wildey were eliminated from the NCAA tennis championships on Thursday. Wildey lost in his second-round singles match to the No. 8 seed, Byron Black of Southern Cal, 7-6 (7-4), 6-2.
May 24, 1991
The L-Asparaginase Shuffle probably won’t ever hit dance clubs. The shuffle was created by a group of young cancer patients at the Kansas University Medical Center. They found that doing the shuffle helps alleviate the pain caused from L-Asparaginase, a leukemia drug that is injected into the thigh.
Jamie Lynn Stiles
May 24, 1991
DEMOCRATIC KUWAIT?
May 24, 1991
So much for the goal of making Kuwait safe for democracy. A multi-national military coalition led by the United States moved into the Mideast earlier this year to push the forces of Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait. Saddam had no right to take over the country, but current events in Kuwait seem to indicate that the restored government of the emir may not be much more democratic than the Iraqi dictator.
TRIAL SCHEDULED IN KU BOMB CASE
May 24, 1991
A June 10 jury trial has been scheduled for two men accused of planting a pipe bomb March 28 at Kansas University. Brent Anderson, an assistant U.S. attorney in Wichita, said a pretrial hearing, originally scheduled for today for the two men, was not held because no motions were filed. U.S. District Judge Richard Rogers, who is hearing the case in Topeka, scheduled the trial date.
BASKETBALL SLATE NOT YET FINALIZED
May 24, 1991
You lucky season ticket holders as you know it’s getting tougher and tougher to land a ducat to Kansas basketball games have probably been wondering whom the Jayhawks will be playing next season at Allen Fieldhouse. Though the schedule has not yet been finalized, KU is planning on home games against DePaul, Louisville, Pepperdine, Arkansas Little-Rock, Florida A&M, Seattle Pacific and Maryland-Baltimore County.
HOSPITAL REPORT
May 24, 1991
DISMISSALS Angela Blanchard and baby boy, Lawrence; Natalie Hammond and baby boy, Lawrence; and Rebecca Mills and baby girl, Lawrence.
FOR THE RECORD
May 24, 1991
Law enforcement report Police reports
HOMELESS
May 24, 1991
About 25 Lawrence educators, social service workers and concerned residents met Thursday night as a coalition for housing and homeless issues in Lawrence. By the end of the two-hour meeting, the group decided to focus on providing direct services to the homeless and to form a committee to work with Jeannie Blankenship, the coordinator of homeless action for Lawrence.