Archive for Monday, June 17, 1991

LARGE LECTURE CLASSES SCRAMBLING FOR SPACE

June 17, 1991

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Kansas University administrators were scrambling this morning to craft contingency plans for large lecture classes that previously had been held in Hoch Auditorium.

"It's a difficult process because these particular classes are large and there aren't a lot of options," said Brenda Selman, assistant registrar for enrollment.

Brower Burchill, associate vice chancellor for academic affairs, said he hoped new locations for classes scheduled in Hoch would be set by the end of the day.

"A committee has been formed and is meeting off and on today to discuss what will happen," said Burchill.

Disciplines which had planned to hold large lecture classes those involving several hundred students in Hoch this fall included chemistry, physics, sociology, psychology, history and American studies, and generally catered to freshmen, sophomores and transfer students.

Selman emphasized that the university had no plans to cancel any of the classes that had been scheduled for Hoch.

"WE WILL find homes for these classes," Selman said. "We are in the process of finding ways to accommodate these classes so they can be taught as they have been in the past."

James Muyskens, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, also said no classes would be canceled, although he said it may be necessary to limit enrollment in some.

He said he hoped most decisions about large lecture courses would be made by Tuesday, when transfer students arrive on campus for enrollment.

Muyskens said the most likely locations to handle the large lecture courses were the theaters in Murphy Hall and the auditoriums in the Kansas Union, and by late morning information had begun trickling down to some departments that their classes would be moved to those venues.

Edwin J. Martin, psychology chairman, said his department's two large lecture courses would be taught in the Union's Woodruff Auditorium this fall.

Enrollment in only one of the classes, Individual Differences, may be affected, Martin said. That class could accommodate 750 people in Hoch, but Martin said the enrollment may be capped at 390 this fall in case the class has to be moved to a smaller theater in Murphy Hall. Enrollment in Social Psychology, for which 500 students are expected, won't be affected.

"WE'VE ESCAPED basically unscathed this time," he said.

Daryl Evans, associate professor of sociology, said he's been told he will teach his Elements of Sociology lecture course in Murphy's Crafton-Preyer Theater. That class already has an enrollment cap of 1,000 and the theater holds 1,100 people.

Evans said the switch may actually be something of a blessing.

"I don't see it as a minor irritation at all because Murphy is a nice hall, and it has air conditioning," he said.

Evans said his students "sweltered" in Hoch early in the fall semester and strained to hear over noise from large fans that basically just recirculated hot air.

"Despite the fact that I loved the old place and felt at home teaching there, the shift may actually be nice for myself and the students."

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