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Archive for Monday, February 11, 1991

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POLITICAL HUCKSTERING
February 11, 1991
Let’s hope the City of Lawrence sticks to its promise to remove political signs which do not conform to local codes, and that foolish demonstrations and protests are not allowed to alter this stand. City commission and school board voting is just around the corner. With the sizable fields for the races, we can expect to see a lot of huckstering in the days ahead. But there are rules and regulations regarding signs for candidates, and these have been violated in the past.
TAXES ENTER SEVERAL CLASSROOMS AT LHS
February 11, 1991
When students in Lawrence High School’s Officetronics course get to class, they use a time card to clock in. And if they happen to arrive late, they’ll see that tardiness reflected in their paychecks. Those payments are not part of a new incentive to keep teen-agers in school. Rather, they’re used to teach students about the world of taxes.
EUDORA CITY CLERK FINDS THE JOB BUSIER THAN EVER
February 11, 1991
When JoAnne Becker first started working as a part-time office assistant for the city of Eudora in 1969, the city clerk and one assistant handled utility billing for about 800 customers and wrote out all payroll records by hand. Becker took over as city clerk in 1988, and although most everything now is computerized and she has the help of two full-time assistants and one part-time worker, the job is more hectic than ever.
FOOD DRIVE A NEW TWIST FOR KU SHOW
February 11, 1991
In an effort to do more than “throw money” at the United Way, Kansas University students participating in this year’s Rock Chalk Revue are taking philanthropy a step further. “We’ve gotten flak for years that Rock Chalk just throws money at people,” said Leigh Reinhart, executive director of the 43rd Rock Chalk Revue. “We wanted to do more than just give them a check so this year we’re making a more personal contribution.”
BESSIE M. LEIGH
February 11, 1991
Services for Bessie M. Leigh, 80, Shawnee, will be at 1 p.m. Tuesday at the Overland Park Presbyterian Church, with the Rev. Thomas Young officiating. Burial will be in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lawrence. Mrs. Leigh died Friday at Shawnee Gardens Nursing Center in Shawnee.
EVA A. ABRAHAM
February 11, 1991
Services for Eva Agnes Abraham, 97, Lawrence, are pending at Rumsey Funeral Home. Mrs. Abraham died Sunday at Silver Oaks Health Center, Hutchinson. She was born March 12, 1893, on a farm near Prairie Center in Johnson County. She lived in Lawrence for 50 years.
JAMES M. KERBY
February 11, 1991
Services for James M. Kerby, 70, Lawrence, will be at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday at Warren-McElwain Mortuary with the Rev. Bill Bradford officiating. Burial will be in Memorial Park Cemetery. Mr. Kerby died Sunday at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
BARRY J. WARREN
February 11, 1991
Services for Barry Jay Warren, 30, Rantoul, will be at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday at the United Methodist Church in Overbrook, with the Rev. Bud Braker officiating. Military graveside services will be conducted by Anderson-Raible American Legion Post 239 at Overbrook Cemetery. Mr. Warren died Sunday at Ransom Memorial Hospital in Ottawa.
POST OFFICE
February 11, 1991
The Lawrence post offices remain out of the 4-cent “makeup” stamp, a local postal official said today. Bill Lawrence, assistant postmaster, said he would check again today with a postal division distribution center in Wichita as to when Lawrence would receive more of the makeup stamps. The stamps were made necessary by a postal rate increase on Feb. 3 in which the cost of a first-class letter changed from 25 cents to 29 cents.
BILL WOULD REQUIRE NCAA DUE PROCESS
February 11, 1991
Sen. Wint Winter Jr., R-Lawrence, plans to introduce legislation by Wednesday that would require the National Collegiate Athletic Assn. to provide due process in investigations of member schools and would clarify the NCAA’s tax status. Winter, a lawyer and former Kansas University football player, said the legislation stems from the NCAA’s “indifference” to the constitutional right of due process.
SYMBOLS OF SUPPORT
February 11, 1991
To the Editor: I am writing to commend Mr. and Mrs. Booher (2-7-91) and others for taking the time to exercise their right to free speech. As an American citizen, I am proud of the right that we all have to speak (or not speak) to various issues. My question is, however, why do the Boohers “insist upon a display of support for our troops” from just the businesses on Massachusetts Street? Have they never driven down 23rd? What about the businesses on Sixth Street, Ninth Street or Iowa?
FOR THE RECORD
February 11, 1991
Law enforcement report Injury accidents
OLINGER SERVICES
February 11, 1991
Memorial services for Davida Charlotte Olinger, 89, Lawrence, were to be this afternoon at Presbyterian Manor, Lawrence, with the Rev. James A. Mahon officiating. Inurnment is scheduled for 11 a.m. Tuesday at Mount Hope Cemetery in Topeka. Inurnment originally had been scheduled for 1 p.m. Tuesday.
IN TEXAS
February 11, 1991
Many Texans will hold still for a lot of setbacks and insults, but play around with their high school football and you’ve got problems, pardner. That, however, didn’t faze the residents of Brock, located in the middle of Texas, where “even cotton, cattle, chili and crude (oil) take a back seat to high school football.” By a vote of 295-190 the biggest turnout in the town’s history citizens recently rejected a proposal to “include football in the extracurricular program.” Historians say it’s the first they’ve ever heard of a football referendum in Texas. You can imagine the shock of the decision. And we can be sure there will be efforts at appeal and a recount by the hard-nosed “jock segment” of Brock society.
CITIES FACING INFRASTRUCTURE PROBLEMS
February 11, 1991
As populations expand in several area communities, city officials are feverishly working to deal with deteriorating infrastructures. State and federal mandates hit city offices, requiring upgraded roads, sewers and water systems. But the money to pay for such projects can be hard to find.
TRIO LOSES ITS LUGGAGE, BUT NOT ITS TALENT
February 11, 1991
LEGISLATORS CRITICAL OF STATE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
February 11, 1991
Last week wasn’t an exceptionally good one in Topeka for the Kansas Chamber of Commerce and Industry. During a Thursday meeting of the Senate Assessment and Taxation Committee, Minority Leader Jerry Karr, an Emporia Democrat, and Sen. Audrey Langworthy, R-Prairie Village, criticized the KCCI for a lackluster performance in helping state officials formulate a plan for property tax relief.
ECONOMIC GROWTH SLOWING IN CITY
February 11, 1991
Although many other parts of the country have seen a recession, Lawrence has been somewhat insulated from an economic downturn so far, a local employment official said today. However, a Lawrence Chamber of Commerce official says state figures also indicate growth in the local economy has slowed and more local people are going out of town to find work.
STUDENTS RECEIVE HILLTOPPER AWARDS
February 11, 1991
Six Kansas University seniors have received Hilltopper Awards, sponsored by KU’s Jayhawker Yearbook. The students were chosen for their service and leadership in campus and community activities and for their academic achievement. The 1991 Hilltoppers are Anita Bajaj, Wichita; Vince Calhoun, Olathe; Tom Cartmell, Mission Hills; Carol Krekeler, St. Louis; Michael Schreiner, WaKeeney; and Jeffrey Wilson, Council Grove.
CORRECTION
February 11, 1991
The Journal-World incorrectly reported in Friday’s “On the record” section that Michael S. Hyatt, 19, no address listed, was granted probation on misdemeanor counts of unlawful deprivation of property, opening a vending machine and possessing tools for damaging or opening a vending machine. A judge Friday sentenced Hyatt to jail and ordered restitution to be a condition of his release on parole.
BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATION CONTINUES
February 11, 1991
Black History Month will be celebrated at Kansas University with a series of events throughout February. The following is a calendar of campus events for the second half of the month. All events are open to the public.
FIRM SEEKS NEARLY $788,000 IN TAX ABATEMENT FROM CITY
February 11, 1991
An Illinois-based plastics firm considering relocation to Lawrence will submit a request for a tax abatement of almost $788,000 to the city commission Tuesday. The company, Galt Plastics Corp. of Glenview, Ill., is requesting a 10-year, 50 percent abatement, the maximum allowable under the city’s abatement policy.
ANTLERS AWAIT KU TUESDAY
February 11, 1991
Just a freshman, Adonis Jordan was a target of Missouri’s student cheering section the infamous Antlers last season. “Before the game, they said `Adonis, it sounds like cheap perfume.’ I laughed,” said Jordan. He scored one point and had four assists in KU’s 95-87 loss in Columbia, Mo.
KUMC TO INTRODUCE NEW CONTRACEPTIVE
February 11, 1991
A Kansas University Medical Center doctor plans Thursday to introduce Norplant, a substance that provides five years of contraception, into one of her patients. KUMC, located in Kansas City, Kan., is one of 90 U.S. medical centers to receive Norplant. Implants are inserted into a woman’s upper arm, KUMC physicians said.
EUDORA RAMBLES BY POMONA, 76-64
February 11, 1991
Matt Grosdider scored 25 points and Mark Brunk pulled down 14 rebounds as Eudora stopped Pomona, 76-64, in high school basketball here Saturday. Adam Gabriel added 21 points while Chad Hunsaker chipped in with 18 points and 13 rebounds for the Cardinals, now 4-12. John Abel didn’t score for Eudora, but had 10 assists.
BAND DIRECTOR TRUMPETS STRIDES IN KU PROGRAM
February 11, 1991
For 20 years Bob Foster has tooted the horn of the Kansas University band program. As director of bands, Foster has taught, conducted, administrated and led the program through a period of growth and change. “I always thought if I lasted as long as I have then I could sit back and take it easy,” Foster, 52, said. “But I found out you just can’t let up.”
DISCOUNT FARES SPUR TRIPS TO TRAVEL AGENT
February 11, 1991
The offices of local travel agents were the destination of choice this weekend as thousands of people took advantage of discount fares being offered by a regional airline. But following the weekend rush, travel agents were finding out this morning that many flights were overbooked and some of their customers might not get the seats they purchased. Others were fearful that the move by America West Airlines to cut rates by 50 percent could be a signal that the employee-owned airline is heading for a crash landing.
VANDALISM SPREE SPURS 70 REPORTS
February 11, 1991
Lawrence police have taken more than 70 reports stemming from a vandalism spree in which car windows were shot out with a BB gun late last week and over the weekend. Chris Mulvenon, Lawrence police spokesman, said today that officers are continuing to take reports about the spree, which has caused more than $5,000 damage.
HOSPITAL REPORT
February 11, 1991
DISMISSALS Monica Gutierrez and baby girl, Lawrence.
WILL OU QUALIFY FOR NCAA FIELD
February 11, 1991
If it isn’t one thing to worry about in the Big Eight Conference region it’s another. First it was that fear the New Madrid Fault would do a thunderous in-your-face earth-splitting monster jam. And now it’s the suspicion the boomer in “Boomer Sooner” is the sound of Oklahoma’s basketball team destructing.
GULF PROTEST
February 11, 1991
Massachusetts Street at South Park continues to serve as a rallying point for two sides of the Persian Gulf war on Sunday afternoons. About 350 people gathered on the east side of the street to protest the U.S. military action in the gulf. The group, coordinated by the Lawrence Coalition for Peace and Justice, has been meeting on Sundays since November.
S JAMISON RANKED IN FOUR STAT CATEGORIES
February 11, 1991
Kansas’ Alonzo Jamison ranks in the top ten in four Big Eight individual basketball statistical categories after last weekend’s games. The 6-5 junior is third in field goal percentage (.629), second in steals (2.6) and ninth in both rebounding (6.7) and assists (3.9).
SMALL TOWNS STRUGGLE TO MAINTAIN, IMPROVE SERVICES
February 11, 1991
The recently released 1990 U.S. Census figures show that Tonganoxie’s population has increased about 25 percent in the past 10 years. City Administrator Bill Crawford says the growth represents both a thrill and a challenge.