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Archive for Friday, February 1, 1991

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POOR BUSINESS MOVE
February 1, 1991
To the Editor: I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. The administrators of the Lawrence school system have again proved that they have little business acumen, paying $600,000 for a building that only recently sold for $295,000. A fine way to handle school funds in this day of uncertain economy.
FUTILE FIGHT
February 1, 1991
A small group of county residents who claim to be trying to save the taxpayers money is actually doing just the opposite. The three county residents filed a lawsuit late last year contesting the results of an election supporting a $4 million bond issue to help pay for construction of the South Lawrence Trafficway. The lawsuit, which contends that an explanatory statement on the ballot was biased in favor of the bond issue, was dismissed in December by a Douglas County judge. On Friday, the same judge rejected a request to reconsider that dismissal. Yet, the residents say they probably will continue their battle, perhaps appealing the local ruling to the Kansas Court of Appeals.
REPUBLICAN LEADER
February 1, 1991
Kansas Republicans, as well as all those interested in good government, should be pleased with the selection of Kim Wells as GOP state chairman. As state chairman, Wells has the responsibility of trying to strengthen the Republican Party in the Sunflower State and elect more Republicans to local, state and national offices. Such a challenge requires the recruitment of top-flight men and women who will agree to serve as candidates for these offices. This is where the state benefits, because the better the candidates, both Republican and Democratic, the better the chances for good, sound, forward-looking government.
CELEBRITY STANDS
February 1, 1991
To the Editor: Syndicated columnist Anna Quindlen, according to her column on page 4C of Sunday’s paper, is offended because some New York Giants football players participated in the anti-abortion video, “Champions for Life.” It reminds me of the furor over Colorado football coach Bill McCartney’s public stance against abortion. Apparently, it is deemed improper, offensive or “out of bounds” when public figures speak out against abortion. That would be taking advantage of their notoriety.
LOCAL FAMILIES FIND SUPPORT FLOURISHES DURING GULF CRISIS
February 1, 1991
Russ McCabria, Kevin Stewart and David Russell were members of Lawrence High School’s 1987 graduating class. Now they’re part of U.S. forces deployed in the Persian Gulf war zone. That LHS connection was discovered Thursday night when a support group for friends and family members of people serving in the Middle East met for the first time.
JUDGE REFUSES TO DISMISS MURDER CASE
February 1, 1991
A local judge Thursday denied a motion to dismiss the case of a man accused of killing two elderly Topeka residents in northern Douglas County in December 1989. The defense had argued that prosecutors violated the defendant’s constitutional protection against double jeopardy by charging him twice for crimes he allegedly committed in Douglas County and Shawnee County.
HOUSING PROJECT ON SCHEDULE
February 1, 1991
Cold, snowy weather hasn’t slowed down construction workers in Eudora. A building project that will bring new senior citizen housing to the city is on schedule, officials say. Jim Walters Construction, a St. Joseph, Mo., firm, was hired to build 36 one-bedroom units, including two apartments equipped for handicapped people, said Rick Lipira, president.
CONSTANCE A. KIPP
February 1, 1991
Private family services for Constance A. Kipp, 83, Lawrence, are pending at Warren-McElwain Mortuary. Cremation is planned. Mrs. Kipp died today at Lawrence Memorial Hospital.
OREAD BLOCK SEEKS HISTORIC STATUS
February 1, 1991
An application for the establishment of Lawrence’s first local historic district was submitted Thursday to the city. Ten residents of the 1000 block of Tennessee and Ohio streets petitioned the city for inclusion on the Lawrence Historic Register.
VOTERS TO DECIDE SALES TAX QUESTION
February 1, 1991
Wellsville voters will decide the fate of a proposed half-cent sales tax increase at April’s election, the city council decided Thursday night. City Clerk Donna Reed said council members passed a resolution to place the sales tax issue on the ballot. Revenue generated by the tax would help fund a number of capital improvements, such as new curbs and sidewalks, she said.
THAW ERASES WEATHER DOLDRUMS
February 1, 1991
January began and ended with pleasant weather, but the 29 mostly dreary days in between made the month miserable for even the cheeriest of souls. Statistically, Lawrence endured a typical January. Of course, that was the problem since January is the coldest and driest month of the year.
PRAEGER FAVORS STATE-PAID AID FOR EMPLOYEES CALLED TO GULF
February 1, 1991
State employees called to active duty in the war against Iraq should have their military pay supplemented by the state, state Rep. Sandy Praeger, R-Lawrence, said Thursday. Praeger has proposed introduction of a bill that would guarantee state employees the difference between their civilian income and their military salary.
WOMAN NOMINATED FOR CHURCH OFFICE
February 1, 1991
Edith Guffey of Lawrence has been nominated for a top national office of the United Church of Christ. The church’s 18-member General Synod Nominating Committee last weekend chose Guffey as its nominee for United Church of Christ secretary from among four candidates. Guffey, 37, is associate director of admissions at Kansas University.
EX-INSURANCE OFFICIAL EAGER TO START NEW JOB
February 1, 1991
Most people retire to a less hectic life. But Lawrence resident and former Kansas Insurance Commissioner Fletcher Bell isn’t most people. Bell, 61, is keeping two irons in the fire since retiring last month from the Kansas Insurance Department where he worked for 33 years, 20 years as commissioner. He starts a job today as a consultant on insurance for the Kansas City law firm of Polsinelli, White, Vardeman & Shalton and also will be a volunteer with the Lawrence Senior Center as an adviser on insurance matters.
S ACTION HELPS SAVE HER HOME
February 1, 1991
Quick action by a 12-year-old girl today helped spare her family’s house from being heavily damaged by fire. Rebekah Sheridan, who was home from school because of an illness, was watching television in a downstairs room shortly before 11 a.m. when an upstairs smoke alarm begin sounding at her house at 127 E. 17th.
FIRE DEPARTMENT NAMES NEW CAPTAIN
February 1, 1991
A 34-year-old Lawrence firefighter and acting officer has been promoted to the rank of captain. Joseph M. Hoelscher, a firefighter with the department since 1984, will fill the position left by Jerry Karr, who was promoted to the rank of major last year.
FAX SERVICE SENDS MESSAGES TO GULF
February 1, 1991
While some servicemen and servicewomen in the Persian Gulf wait up to three weeks for mail, others can receive correspondence in under three days. The Phone Connection of Kansas, located in Suite B of the Louisiana Purchase at 23rd and Louisiana, is offering free fax service for people who want to send messages to friends and family members participating in Operation Desert Storm.
1991 FUNDING CHANCES DIM FOR PARKWAY
February 1, 1991
The vast majority of Kansas communities are meeting their local funding commitments to qualify for grants under the state’s highway system enhancement program, dimming chances that Lawrence’s Eastern Parkway project will pick up any leftover funds. Acting Transportation Secretary Arland Hicks, said that just one small project out of all those funded in the program appears unable to come up with the local funding needed to gain state grants. He did not identify that project.
$50,000 GIFT TO HONOR FORMER BUSINESS DEAN
February 1, 1991
A $50,000 pledge from a 1934 Kansas University graduate will establish a fund to honor the late Frank Stockton, the first dean of the KU School of Business. The commitment establishes the Arch J. Galloway in Memory of Dean Frank Stockton Fund at the KU Endowment Association. The fund will be used for academic programs in the School of Business and will help students prepare for business careers.
TAX COLLECTIONS PASS HALF-WAY POINT
February 1, 1991
Douglas County is past the half-way mark in collecting 1990 taxes. As of Jan. 10, treasurer Nancy Hempen said the county had received $27,590,382 of the $42,691,296 due in 1990 real estate, public utility and personal property taxes.
CITY TO CONSIDER PLAN FOR SIXTH STREET CHANGES
February 1, 1991
A plan to implement controversial changes in the configuration of Sixth Street could emerge from the Lawrence City Commission’s meeting Tuesday. “What we’re doing is looking at all the recommendations and trying to decide which things we want to implement,” Mayor Shirley Martin-Smith said today.
2 CHARGED WITH KIDNAPPING
February 1, 1991
A second suspect has been arrested in connection with Sunday’s kidnapping of five Linwood residents. Janette Nesmith, public relations officer with the Leavenworth County Sheriff’s Office, said that Randy Davis, 29, Bonner Springs, turned himself in to the Edwardsville Police Department on Wednesday, after he heard that a warrant had been issued for his arrest.
RESIDENTS APPEAL TRAFFICWAY RULING
February 1, 1991
An attorney for three county residents who lost two attempts in district court to block the county’s use of bonds for the South Lawrence Trafficway has taken the case to the Kansas Court of Appeals. On Thursday, Don Strole, attorney for Leslie W. Blevins Sr., Tim Miller and Patty Boyer, filed a notice of appeal in Douglas County District Court for the case to be heard in state appellate court.
WITH SMITS SIDELINED, DREILING SHOWING HILL, PACERS HE CAN DO JOB
February 1, 1991
The wait to prove himself in the NBA has tested the patience of 7-foot-1 Greg Dreiling. After more than four years and four coaching changes with the Indiana Pacers, Dreiling has starting to show the potential he always believed was there.
SHORTAGE OF WORK SPACE PUTS THE SQUEEZE ON COUNTY OFFICES
February 1, 1991
Office space is a precious commodity for many Douglas County employees, whose work areas are shrinking as county operations continue to expand. “I don’t think there’s an office here that in some way doesn’t have real space needs,” said County Administrator Chris McKenzie. “It ranges from the kind of space problem that inconveniences the public … to the kind of inconvenience, or morale problem, that we have in a few of our offices where the people and machinery are concentrated so compactly that I think our efficiency is being affected.”
YELLOW RIBBON, GREETING CARD DEMAND BOOMS ON HOMEFRONT
February 1, 1991
The demand for yellow ribbons and bows to show support for U.S. troops in the Persian Gulf has Hallmark Cards Inc.’s local production facility spinning out more yellow ribbon than any other color. Meanwhile, some local greeting card shop owners contacted today say they’ve had people specifically ask for cards designed to send to the troops for Valentine’s Day.
WHO CAN AFFORD TO PAY HUSKERS?
February 1, 1991
If you’ve ever crossed our state’s northern frontier, you’ve no doubt noticed a large green and white sign proclaiming: NEBRASKA. THE GOOD LIFE. I’m sure life in Nebraska is good indeed, although I believe the Cornhusker State probably offered a better life back in the early 60s when it was one of the few states left without a sales tax.
S NUDE SCENE
February 1, 1991
Unlike their counterparts in Wichita, local authorities aren’t planning to take any action against performers who appear in the nude for a brief time in a dance-theater production coming to Kansas University next week. “I think the police department really has no business interfering with academic arts programs,” Jim Denney, director of the Kansas University Police Department, said this morning. “I have no intention of interfering with academic expression.”
KU DEBATE TEAM RECORD SAYS IT ALL
February 1, 1991
It can be argued that the Kansas University debate squad is on a roll. “Two-thirds through the year, we’ve won 60 awards,” Robert Rowland, KU forensics director, said Thursday. “That would put us about 60 percent ahead of last year’s pace.”
LIONS AVENGE LOSS TO LANCERS
February 1, 1991
Lawrence High’s girls basketball team avenged its only loss of the season Thursday night, tripping Shawnee Mission East, 44-42, in overtime at the Lancers’ gym. “Basically what it comes down to is it’s hard to win at East. They play so well together. Every year they put together a good team,” said Lion coach Gary Hammer. His Lions improved to 11-1 overall while East dropped to 9-6.
NO PEACE DIVIDEND
February 1, 1991
To the Editor: This past Saturday, the 26th, I participated in a peace demonstration in Washington, D.C., We were there to support our troops in the gulf and their safe return home. If we prevail, they come home alive. If George Bush and his supporters continue to prevail, many thousands will come home dead or injured, and tens of thousands more innocent Arabs will be killed or injured with them.
THELMA L. PIERCE
February 1, 1991
Services for Thelma Lee Pierce, 73, Lawrence, are pending at Warren-McElwain Mortuary. Mrs. Pierce died Thursday night at the Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, Kan. She was born March 17, 1917.
HOSPITAL REPORT
February 1, 1991
ADMISSIONS Henry Slifer, Lawrence.
SCHOOL NEGOTIATIONS GET UNDER WAY
February 1, 1991
Early retirement benefits and the length of the school calendar are two items that will be on the bargaining table during this year’s Lawrence teacher negotiations. A Lawrence school board team and representatives of the Lawrence Education Assn. kicked off the negotiations with a brief meeting Thursday.
T ELIMINATE ALL JUVENILE FACILITY OBSTACLES
February 1, 1991
Although state funding for construction and operation of juvenile detention centers would more than double under a bill approved Thursday by the Kansas House, officials say obstacles still remain before such a center can be built in Lawrence. The House bill would bring to about $2 million the amount of annual funding available for juvenile detention centers statewide.