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Archive for Saturday, August 17, 1991

Also from August 17

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CHURCH AND STATE
August 17, 1991
To the Editor: First we had the man in Belvue, Kan., who crowned himself “pope.” Now Judge Kelly is trying to outdo him by dictating what Catholic bishops can and can’t say. So where are all the defenders of free speech and the separation of church and state?
CARTOON CONCERN
August 17, 1991
To the Editor: Concerning Mr. Wright’s editorial cartoon in Wednesday’s paper:
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES WORKING TO MAKE LIFE EASIER FOR STUDENTS
August 17, 1991
You’ve had a busy half-day of classes at Kansas University when suddenly you remember that, in less than 30 minutes, you’re scheduled to enroll for next semester. However, instead of heading for a long line of enrollees in Strong Hall, you schedule your classes in comfortable solitude at Watson Library, the Computer Center or even your own home.
PROGRAM
August 17, 1991
Carl Locke, dean of the Kansas University School of Engineering, is not shy about praising his students. “I believe we have the finest students on campus,” said Locke, basing his assessment on average ACT scores.
NEW AT KU
August 17, 1991
Kristin Rieger, Justin Pirnie, and Jenny Adams aren’t sure what to expect from their first semester in college. But they’re eager to get started. For them, high school is over. Now they’re headed to Kansas University and a new academic and social world. In that world, they know that they’re taking on more responsibility. They know they’ll be meeting new people, adapting to new schedules and facing new challenges.
ALASKA TEAM SLUGS TRAVELLERS
August 17, 1991
Strange the thoughts that cross your mind in times of crisis. Take, for example, what occurred to Maupintour right fielder Ron Oelschlager on Friday afternoon as he watched the Kenai, Alaska, Oilers score eight runs before their first out.
LMH AGENDA
August 17, 1991
The Lawrence Memorial Hospital Board of Trustees on Monday will consider a recommendation to hire a planning firm to help develop strategic plans for the hospital. A firm, Quorum Health Resources Inc., has been recommended by a committee of the hospital board to help with long- and short-term hospital planning.
SUNFLOWER PLANT HAS CHANGE OF COMMAND
August 17, 1991
Lt. Col. Richard A. Jackson took command of the Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant near DeSoto on Friday, saying he plans to build on the plant’s impressive record of quality and safety. In a change-of-command ceremony attended by about 250 people, outgoing commander, Lt. Col. Richard M. Hart, received the Legion of Merit recognizing his tenure as commander of the plant since August of 1990.
AGENDA
August 17, 1991
The Douglas County Commission on Monday will decide whether to pay for a road project in a lump sum or on the installment plan. The commissioners will debate the merits of both plans for the project, which will widen U.S. Highway 40 (Sixth Street) from Monterey Way to Wakarusa Drive. In April, county voters approved issuing 20-year bonds for $493,000 for the project. However, the county’s share has been reduced to about $255,000 because of lower-than-expected construction costs.
FOR THE RECORD
August 17, 1991
Law enforcement report Injury accidents A 53-year-old Kansas City, Mo., man was treated at Lawrence Memorial Hospital and released Friday after the triple tractor-trailer he was driving hit some concrete barriers along the Kansas Turnpike about four miles east of Lawrence.
FOOTBALL HAS COME A LONG WAY
August 17, 1991
It’s common for older folks to reflect on the times they went through a given program, then snort how much tougher it was “back when.” They normally say how much easier it is for the kids today, and how these pampered brats run the risk of being too soft. Guys who went through military training in the 1940s will note saner procedures for today’s all-volunteer forces and try to convince you they had it rougher. Maybe, but if modern processes aren’t as tough in some ways, perhaps they are a lot more productive.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
In 1891, Kansas University Chancellor Frank Snow and about a dozen other people gathered in the office of a Topeka attorney to discuss the creation of an organization that would accept monetary gifts to KU. Now, 100 years and thousands of gifts later, the Kansas University Endowment Association has spent close to $400 million in behalf of KU and at the same time built its permanent asset base to approximately $305 million. During the past fiscal year, the association provided approximately $30 million for the university.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
If President Bush needs some examples to illustrate his “thousand points of light” spirit of volunteerism, he can schedule a visit to Mount Oread. At Kansas University, student volunteerism abounds. KU students have discovered that using their spare time to contribute to the community reaps rewards for themselves and the people they help.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
The Kansas University Student Alumni Association is showing the campus and community that being a part of the alumni association can be satisfying both before and after graduation. Since its start in January of 1987, SAA has been acting as a link between students, alumni and the community, said Jeff Johnson, director of external affairs and member development for the KU Alumni Association.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
When Watkins Hall was built in 1926, it gave women with financial needs a place to live while attending Kansas University for about $36 a month. Watkins Hall is now one of eight scholarship halls at KU, and a new hall, Amini Hall, is scheduled to open in the fall of 1992. The new hall will be the first addition to the scholarship hall system since Douthart and Grace Pearson halls were completed in 1957.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
In the 18 years since he retired as chancellor of Kansas University, Ray Nichols hasn’t strayed far from the campus he’s grown to love over the past 60 years. Nichols, 87, whose shaded Cape Cod-style house at 1617 Ala. is just a stone’s throw from campus, continues to play a role in various KU-related activites.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
The T-shirts are everywhere on campus, around the city and across the nation. They sport colorful Jayhawks or the Kansas University seal. But if you think T-shirts are the only Jayhawk items out there, look again.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Kansas University opened its doors 125 years ago with three faculty members presiding over the teaching of Latin, Greek, math and philosophy. Since that time, KU has diversified into a broad-based center of learning with nine professional schools and a College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
William Crowe, dean of Kansas University libraries, says it’s easy for people to be impressed by the university’s huge, gothic-style Watson Library and the more than 1.5 million books it houses. But Crowe hopes that students are impressed with more than just the library’s size.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Clark Bricker, also known as “The Great Bricko,” will always treasure the four teaching awards that Kansas University seniors gave him. Retired Lawrence dentist Paul Getto remembers the financial struggle of many KU students to work during the Depression years to pay for their educations.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Students at Kansas University can make their own choices about where to live, but Kenneth Stoner says living in residence halls can make the first years of a college career more enjoyable and productive. “It gives them time to become familiar with KU facilities and Lawrence,” says Stoner, director of student housing. “There are a whole lot of details that are commonly overlooked by students renting an apartment or a house for the first time.”
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
For two decades, the Kansas Honors Program has been saluting the state’s top high school seniors and encouraging them to attend college in Kansas. And while they wouldn’t mind seeing the state’s brightest students enroll at Kansas University, program officials say the key is for students to attend the college that’s right for them. Sometimes it’s a regional university. Sometimes it’s KU.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
To achieve his goals as president of the Kansas University Alumni Association, Glee Smith will be calling on some KU friends all 200,000 of them. Smith, who became president July 1 after Jack Robinson’s term ended, said involving the alumni, former students and friends of the university in fund-raising efforts would be the primary objective during his one-year term.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Take a look at Paul Coker Jr.’s office studio and it all makes sense. It’s a scene Coker himself might have drawn for the pages of MAD magazine a cartoonist struggling to work in a tiny space amidst a waist-high conglomeration of years of accumulated drawings, books, scripts, mail and eraser shavings.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Kansas University students may find themselves getting some tough economic lessons. Money and debt are serious business, and Diane Del Buono, director of KU’s Office of Financial Aid, and Evy Gershon, assistant director, both say students have to be aware of the money end of education.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Feedback that’s what Janet Hughes gets from the art faculty at Kansas University. The MFA candidate and teaching assistant worked on her own for several years between teaching at a Kansas City private school. But she says she needed the discipline an MFA program would lend if she were to advance in her art.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Not all the art in the Helen Foresman Spencer Museum of Art hangs on its walls. Not by a longshot. More than 9,000 works are stored in a room off the third floor in the Max Kade and Erich H. Markel Department of Graphic Arts. That’s where the museum collection of prints, drawings and photographs lay waiting for students or the public to investigate.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
In his office, Dan Gailey holds a Star Wars version of a saxophone that’s plugged into a computer and a synthesizer. It has fingerings like a saxophone, and when you blow into it, it makes music. But it’s music translated into digital symbols and shot back to the ear.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
This fall, members of the dance faculty at Kansas University and their students will get to pick the brain of a certified “genius.” That’s because Jacques d’Amboise, a former soloist with the New York City Ballet and a recipient of a MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant, will be teaching a master class at KU. He’ll also be delivering a lecture sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities and teaching a class for sixth-grade students in the Lawrence public schools.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Jacqueline Davis spent mid-June in Europe reviewing performances she could bring to Lawrence as part of the Kansas University Concert, New Directions or Chamber Music series. When she returned, however, she found herself minus a concert hall in which to present those acts. Hoch Auditorium, where Davis had scheduled Concert Series events in the past, had been gutted by a June 15 fire.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
They may want to write the songs the whole world sings. Or they may want to write the score to the next hit film or musical. Or they may want to write the symphony that orchestras want to play and classical music audiences want to hear.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
In the world of Kansas University performing arts, it takes a big volunteer effort just to get you to your seat. Last year, about 300 people participated in the Ambassador program, run by the Murphy Hall box office. In exchange for a free seat to a performance, these volunteers serve as greeters, ushers and guards at the Crafton-Preyer Theatre, the Inge Theatre or Liberty Hall.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Virginia Benson of Kansas City, Kan., gave $1 million for loans to Kansas University students. And there was $25,000 from Josephine Pardee of Lawrence for student scholarships.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
This time next year construction will be nearly finished on the $6 million Regents Center, a satellite campus of the state university system operated by Kansas University. The new center, under construction at 127th Street and Quivira Road in Overland Park, will enable KU to expand services in the greater Kansas City area.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
If you’re heading out on the town, there’s plenty of choice in Lawrence nightlife. Both students and Lawrence residents mingle at the numerous bars and live music outlets around the city. The gathering places draw bands from across the country on tour and area bands of all ages, sizes and styles.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
After a fire gutted Hoch Auditorium in June, Jack Wright became a rather popular figure on campus. Wright, as director of University Theatre, helped schedule both classes and performances in the Crafton-Preyer Theatre, where two large lecture classes would have to be rescheduled.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Kansas University’s theater and film department isn’t just for actors. In a sense, it’s for everybody. “I’m pretty happy that the theater faculty go out of their way to include students who aren’t majors,” said John Gronbeck-Tedesco, the acting chair of the department.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
The School of Fine Arts is 100 years old this year. But don’t expect many parades or parties. There are too many things to do and too little money to do it. “I was talking to people about it because it’s coming on the heels of the 125th anniversary of the university,” said Peter Thompson, the dean of the school. “And I really don’t know if we’ll do anything significant just because we’re 100 years old. There are more important things to work on. We need to open the Lied Center properly, and we have some other problems to solve.”
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Construction companies, fighting a lull in the building industry, may view developments at Kansas University this academic year as a double-edged sword. No less than $50 million in building projects are scheduled for KU’s Lawrence campus and the KU Medical Center in Kansas City, Kan.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Kansas University students are told to aim high during college set goals, achieve them, set higher goals. The same was true for KU Chancellor Gene Budig when he set a challenging goal for the Campaign Kansas fund drive, the largest in KU’s history.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Now in its 104th year at Kansas University, the Jayhawker yearbook will be presenting a more personal touch in its 1992 edition. “We’re going to try to picture a broader base of students,” said Bob Turvey, Jayhawker faculty adviser. “It won’t just be the senior pictures that we’ll be taking.”
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
David Morrison spends his days trying to learn more about septic shock. Septic shock, which Morrison calls a terrible disease, affects the lives of 50,000 to 100,000 Americans annually and carries a 30 percent to 50 percent mortality rate.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
From public markets to Hypermarts, grocery stores in America have come a long way in the past century. And James Mayo, a Kansas University professor of architecture, is in the process of writing a grocery history in a book he hopes to be out by 1994.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Judy Hills may be gearing up for her first fall semester with the Kansas University School of Education, but she’s already familiar with many of its students. Joining the school in March as the new coordinator of field experiences, her work began long before the school’s student teachers, interns and students in the graduate certification program gather for an orientation meeting next week before beginning their field experiences in schools. Their fall placements already have been made.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
During the past five years, research dollars at the Kansas University Medical Center have increased from about $10 million to a figure that will approach $30 million this year, the dean of graduate studies and research said recently. A.L. Chapman, dean of graduate studies and research at KUMC, said that figure encompasses all parts of the med center the schools of medicine, nursing and allied health.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
The Helen Foresman Spencer Museum of Art routinely displays sacred art from medieval Europe. But come January, the Spencer will play host to an exhibition of works that may not be recognizable to U.S. audiences Mexican retablo painting.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
A floppy “Revenge on the Umpire Tear-Apart Stress Doll” shares shelf space in Jim Carothers’ office with more substantial art works: several Faulkner and Hemingway novels along with baseball books by the likes of writers Roger Angell and Thomas Boswell. Academics pored over the Faulkner and Hemingway works long before Carothers, associate dean of liberal arts at KU and an English professor, began teaching two decades ago. But Carothers has done his part to bridge the gap between the scholarly world and popular culture by intoducing English 479, the literature of baseball, to KU.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Q. What should KU’s top priorities be for the coming year “Our priorities for the University of Kansas must be a far more competitive wage for our faculty and staff, which is vital to effective recruitment and retention; enhanced funding for OOE (other operating expenses), which is basic to the realization of our teaching and research objectives; and acceleration of our plan to replace Hoch Auditorium, which is essential to our instructional and library missions.”
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
It’s obvious that Eleanor Sullivan has a bias when it comes to nursing. Nurses, she believes, are the backbone of health care in the United States. And as dean of the School of Nursing at the Kansas University Medical Center in Kansas City, Kan., Sullivan believes her main job is promoting her field.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
State funding for Kansas University’s School of Education may be down, but the school’s dean, Ed Meyen, is pleased to report that student performance, teacher certifications and alumni contributions to the school are all up. On top of that, the school was re-accredited this spring, receiving high marks in the areas of curriculum, faculty and research contributions.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Kansas University’s geography department seemed the natural place to put a map-making service aimed at serving faculty needs when it was launched in the mid-1970s. A cartographer by profession, Barbara Shortridge helped launch the service, working as its first acting manager for a few months until a permanent director arrived in town.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Undergraduate science education and faculty development will receive special attention this year in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. “If you look at some of the shortcomings in higher education, our inability to interest … young people in the sciences would be high on that list,” said James Muyskens, dean of the college.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
The late Emporia Gazette editor William Allen White’s writing about Kansas University seems as pertinent today as it was nearly 100 years ago. “The same kinds of issues are brought up. The university wasn’t getting enough money,” said Del Brinkman, vice chancellor for academic affairs at KU.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Graduate teaching assistants tend to get a bad rap from students at Kansas University. When students come to KU, many of them expect their classes to be taught by professors, not people who are not much older than themselves.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Linda Trueb is researching a family tree for frogs. Trueb, professor of systematics and ecology and curator of herpetology at Kansas University’s Museum of Natural History, has focused her research on members of the family Pipidae, also known as pipid frogs. She hopes to determine the number of species and their relationships among themselves and to their fossil relatives.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Sprechen sie Deutsch? Parlez vous Francais? Habla Espanol? Kansas University students who answer yes to one of the above questions may have gained their language skills in one of KU’s many foreign language programs.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
For many foreign students at Kansas University, the Office of Foreign Student Services is literally their first stop on campus. At the beginning of each semester, many foreign students step right off an airport shuttle bus and go directly to the office in the basement of Strong Hall, suitcases in tow.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Kansas University leads Big Eight schools and ranks seventh among the country’s state universities in academic quality, says the newest edition of a prestigious college guide. The 1992 “Fiske Guide to Colleges,” written by Edward Fiske of The New York Times, awarded KU four stars out of five for academics. KU also received four stars last year.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Reviewing the highlights of the past year at Kansas University’s William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communications, Dean Mike Kautsch reached back to remember the man for whom the school is named. White, the famed publisher of the Emporia Gazette, was known for his small-town advocacy.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Laptop computers for medical students and an innovative rural health care program for practicing residents are new offerings at the Wichita branch of the Kansas University School of Medicine. “We’re trying to give the students systems that will enable them to make the transition to electronic media from the paper trail,” said Leland Parks, assistant professor of internal medicine at the KU School of Medicine-Wichita.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
If Kansas University’s architecture students can’t find their dean in his office, they might look for him in the cockpit of his new red Miata or underneath a soaring stunt kite. Max Lucas isn’t skipping out of his duties as dean KU’s School of Architecture and Urban Design consistently rates among the best but his occupation doesn’t double as a preoccupation.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Imagine studying laser physics and optoelectronics in a 580-year-old university on the coast of Scotland; or business in the Central American nation of Costa Rica; or natural sciences in mountainous Besancon, France. Kansas University students can do more than imagine those faraway places. The university’s study abroad programs offer a multitude of opportunities for students to see the world while working toward a college degree.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Improving the quality of Kansas University’s School of Business is the primary goal of Dean Joe Bauman in the coming academic year even though this year’s budget will be tight. “The biggest change going on is we are looking at each one of our degree programs and trying to improve that,” Bauman said.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
John Ferraro, acting dean of Kansas University’s School of Allied Health, believes the job opportunities for his graduates are tremendous. Because of the increased attention to providing services to children and the elderly, Ferraro said, the demand for allied health professionals is very high.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
To ease the increasing pressure of packing more information into its curriculum, the School of Pharmacy at Kansas University is prescribing an extra year of study to its degree program. The six-year doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) program, which is for undergraduates despite its doctoral sounding title, has existed for three years. Currently, 14 of the school’s 95 undergraduate students are enrolled in the Pharm.D. program. By the turn of the century, however, all undergraduate pharmacy students may find themselves in school for six years instead of five.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Daryle Busch, Kansas University chemistry professor, refers to himself as the “father of macrocycles,” but one might also think of him as Lord of the Rings. That’s because macrocycles are complex molecules with a large ring structure. And like the Lord of the Rings in J.R.R. Tolkien’s trilogy, a person who knows how to use such rings can work wonders.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
After a year’s worth of work with high-speed cinematography and force plates and computer digitizers, Carole Zebas and Rob Gillette have proved what handicappers have known for years it’s not easy to pick a sure-thing greyhound. Zebas, director of Kansas University’s biomechanics lab and professer of health, physical education and recreation, and Gillette, a veterinarian-in-residence with KU’s Animal Care Unit, have been working with a one-year grant from the Kansas Racing Commission to study the way greyhounds run.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Jayhawks dining at the K.S. “Boots” Adams Alumni Center at Kansas University these days won’t notice any differences in service, but with the July departure of long-time general manager Kevin Carroll, change is the order of the day. Bryan Greve, new manager of the center’s Learned Club, says that many plans for the coming school year already were in place for the Learned Club. Those plans, he said, are still on track.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
It began with a small handful of retirees and a gift from a retired Phillips Petroleum Inc. executive about eight years ago. But now, the Kansas University Retirees Club can boast about 240 members, whose activities revolve around the Adams Alumni Center, home of the KU Alumni Association.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
The goal of communications executive Jack Sampson chairman of the Kansas Board of Regents is to bridge gaps in understanding between students, faculty, legislators and anyone else involved with Kansas higher education. “This will be a year of bridge building,” said Sampson, elected this summer to chair the board, which has jurisdiction over Kansas University and five other state universities.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Raucous sousaphones and bleacher-shaking drums, red and blue uniforms with plumes pointing to the sky. Longtime fans often associate the Kansas University Marching Band with such audible and visual traditions.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
If you’re interested in communications or listening to worldwide broadcasts, the Kansas University Amateur Radio Club, Inc. has something to offer. “The club has been active since before World War II,” said Richard Moore, KU professor of electrical and computer engineering, and co-sponsor of the club.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
When fire ravaged Kansas University’s Hoch Auditorium in mid-June, the loss was of historic proportions. No one understood that more than the members of the Historic Mount Oread Fund, a special branch of the Kansas University Endowment Association.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
The typical Kansas University freshman has to come up with are you ready at least $200 to buy required textbooks for the first semester of classes. And first- and second-year students are the lucky shoppers, according to operators of the two Lawrence textbook stores that serve KU students.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Here you have a sword that belonged to Kansas University’s second chancellor. And there’s vintage film footage of Phog Allen and James Naismith tossing a basketball around. The sword and film are just two pieces of history that have found their way to KU’s attic, otherwise known as KU Archives.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Kansas University alumni now have three special occasions to lure them back to Mount Oread homecoming in the fall, Alumni Weekend in the spring and commencement in May. Last year, the KU Alumni Association tried something different with its first-ever Alumni Weekend scheduled before commencement. Alumni activities previously were planned to coincide with commencement.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Need some help with your income taxes? Having trouble getting back a security deposit from a landlord? Need to get a document notarized? Those are some of the services offered to Kansas University students at the Legal Services for Students office, located in the Burge Union.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Shannon Hull made it to the Final Four and won’t forget it. As one of Kansas University’s dozen Crimson Girls, a spirit squad that performs dance routines for KU basketball fans, Hull was in the Indianapolis Hoosierdome last spring when the Jayhawks made their bid for a national basketball championship.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Times have changed for the Kansas University chapter of the Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs. When Curtis Marsh, the current president, attended his first meeting three years ago, the organization for students interested in business had a small turnout.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
The director of the Joyce and Elizabeth Hall Center for the Humanities at Kansas University defines the center’s purpose succinctly. “Our main mission is faculty development,” explains Andrew Debicki, who is in his third year as Hall Center director. “When I came in here two years ago, that’s what I came in to do.”
CARTOON CHARACTERS CATCH EYE OF COLLECTORS
August 17, 1991
Collecting the original frames of cartoons and animated films is a rapidly growing hobby as well as a profitable investment, collectors of the artwork say. “You get to own a piece of history with these,” said Tim Gillesse, one of several Lawrence area collectors.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
The work of Kansas University’s School of Social Welfare isn’t limited to the classroom. Social Welfare Dean Ann Weick says the school has a commitment to helping society and improving social services and it practices what it preaches.
August 17, 1991
Returning Lawrence High School students are voicing mixed opinions on newly created anti-drug and alcohol “contracts,” which students participating in extracurricular school activities will be required to sign for the first time this fall. “Maybe it will set an example for students,” said Jennifer Trapp, 16, who will be a junior this fall at LHS.
HOSPITAL REPORT
August 17, 1991
BIRTHS Jeff and Karen Holdredge, Edgerton, a girl, Thursday.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
What’s the most important thing incoming freshmen students can do when they start their academic careers at Kansas University? “Relax,” say four students who have just completed their first year on Mount Oread.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Fred Williams doesn’t ask for much. He just wants a portion of the 16 to 18 seconds experts say people spend flipping through the daily mail.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Sherwood Thompson has a point to make. Kansas University’s Office of Minority Affairs, he says, serves all students on Mount Oread. While the office is particularly geared to serve the needs of KU’s minority students, Thompson said the school’s entire student population benefits from the programs he directs.
FOR TOLEDO GAME
August 17, 1991
Playing football in Toledo, Ohio, appeals to Kansas quarterback Chip Hilleary because his family lives in the Columbus suburb of Westerville and because he almost signed with the Rockets. “We live an hour and a half from Toledo,” Hilleary said. “It came down to KU and Toledo because, by the end of recruiting, I’d pretty much eliminated the Naval Academy.”
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Fred Woodward is writing the book on where University Press of Kansas will be in the year 2000. “I have a vision of where the press should be,” said Woodward, director of the press, located in a new building at Kansas University.
MEDICAL SCHOOL DEAN EYES RECRUITMENT, FUNDING GOALS
August 17, 1991
For Dr. James Price, medicine seemed a natural fit. The product of a small town, Price was impressed early on by his contact with doctors, and he was intrigued by science.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
For its distinct skyline, Kansas University relies on Fraser Hall and the Campanile. For national attention, action at Allen Fieldhouse and Memorial Stadium provide streams of highlight film. But for day-in, day-out service to students, no building on campus compares to the Kansas Union on Jayhawk Boulevard.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Where to live? How much to study? How to meet people? The questions facing new Kansas University students can be frustrating, but members of KU sororities and fraternities say “going Greek” may be the answer to many of those questions.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
The Kansas University Rugby Football Club has enjoyed its travels to France, Argentina and about half a dozen other countries, but club members also will be happy when their trips become less frequent. When not galavanting about the globe, the club often is traveling the United States in search of stiffer rugby competition than can be found in these parts. However, that picture might soon change as rugby programs in the Midwest become more established.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
This year, the Flying Jayhawks travel program is adding an educational twist to its trip schedule for Kansas University alumni. The program, sponsored by the KU Alumni Association, will offer a week-long voyage in March to Mexico with John Hoopes, a KU professor of anthropology, to study anthropological treasures in places such as Mexico City, Teotihaucan and Palenque.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Keith and Joan Bunnel are making certain Kansas University’s carillon bells ranging from 10 pounds to 7 tons peal “Crimson and the Blue” forever. The Bunnels, Fox Chapel, Pa., have donated $425,000 to restore the musical instrument housed in the 120-foot high World War II Memorial Campanile.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Dana Knapp hovers over a project that sums up five years of work at Kansas University. She’s working on an idealized interior design for a school, one for which she’s let out all the stops. She said she talked to teachers and examined research at the School of Education, incorporating all that data into a design she hopes would please her mentors.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Gene Budig knows his 10th year as chancellor of Kansas University, the state’s largest higher education institution, isn’t going to be easy. One question central to KU’s immediate future has dominated Budig’s thoughts: Can the state of Kansas properly finance the university?
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Real-life television scenes of astronauts walking in space. The Persian Gulf military briefings showing the pinpoint accuracy of Stealth bombers.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
First comes a shocking report: Herbicide X Found in Drinking Water, Public Health at Risk. That’s followed by action demanded by a nervous public: Government Issues Ban on Herbicide X.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
When explaining what they do, officials at Kansas University’s Center for Bioanalytical Research, or CBAR, must struggle to keep from slipping into technical jargon. “What we do is probably the most technical of all of the industries, except for the aerospace industry,” says Christopher M. Riley, a KU associate professor of pharmaceutical chemistry and pharmacy practice.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Kansas University students looking to make a few bucks during the academic year can start their search on the first floor of Strong Hall. There they’ll find a job bulletin board, listing hundreds of part-time jobs available on and off the campus.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Action at the Kansas University law school isn’t as hot as it is on the “L.A. Law” television drama, but KU’s legal-eagles get the job done in the classroom. Consider the evidence:
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
You might call it Lawrence’s biggest indoor playground Kansas University’s Robinson Center. During the day, the 250,000-square-foot building is primarily used for classes by KU’s health, physical education and recreation department.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Adjusting to college life isn’t always easy. But Kansas University students who need a helping hand with that adjustment can find it at the Student Assistance Center in Strong Hall.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
For years, Kansas University held December holiday Vespers in Hoch Auditorium. Beginning in 1993, however, the Vespers are to move into the new $14.3 million Lied Center for the Performing Arts, a brand-new concert hall being constructed on the West Campus of the university.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Kansas University students can learn much from the great thinkers and writers of the past, but shaping that knowledge into a college course is a serious challenge. That’s why the Western Civilization program at KU is considering shuffling different writing selections into the program and soon may be targeting more multicultural aspects as part of a reading list revision.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
The dean of the Wichita branch of Kansas University’s medical school says an expanded curriculum addressing ethical issues and more clinical research are primary goals for the school. Dr. Joseph Meek, dean of the KU School of Medicine-Wichita, says he also wants to continue to stress the primary health care programs that this spring helped give KU’s School of Medicine a high ranking in a national survey.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
When fall classes start each year at Kansas University, life can be a blur for some new Jayhawks. There are so many people and so many things to do. Students may wonder what they’ve gotten themselves into.
KU EDITION
August 17, 1991
Across the country, companies are scrambling to conform to tighter environmental regulations. Governmental agencies are sending out research teams to track pollution. Recycling is in. For Kansas University environmental studies majors, this boom in environmental awareness means jobs. Lots of them.