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Archive for Thursday, April 18, 1991

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RANDALL KNOWS READING
April 18, 1991
(Staff photo by Ben Bigler) Kansas University basketball player Mark Randall reads a poem from “Where the Sidewalk Ends” by Shel Silverstein on Wednesday at West Junior High School. Randall, coach Roy Williams and other local celebrities read at the school as part of “Night of a Thousand Stars,” a program that encourages reading.
TEACHER TO VISIT ASIA AS FELLOWSHIP WINNER
April 18, 1991
A Tonganoxie woman who teaches at Topeka High School recently was selected as one of 101 teachers from across the country to participate in the Rockefeller Fellowship program. Tanya Low, who teaches Asian Studies and Chinese, will receive a stipend of $5,000 to finance eight weeks of intensive study in Taiwan and Japan this summer. She was chosen from a field of more than 520 applicants, who were asked to submit a proposal designed to increase both their knowledge of a language and its culture and to widen the breadth of their teaching skills.
FOR THE RECORD
April 18, 1991
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
$114 BILLION IN UNPAID TAXES
April 18, 1991
Imagine what could be done toward alleviating the federal budget deficit if people who owe the government money would simply pay up. The Internal Revenue Service estimates that by 1992 the tax gap the difference between federal taxes owed on legal income in a year and what is paid without IRS enforcement action will have grown to almost $114 billion. That could wipe out a good deal of the estimated $200 billion deficit and benefit everyone in a lot of ways most notably by cutting federal interest costs and putting more money into circulation.
AREA DISTRICTS OFFER CONTRACTS DESPITE UNCERTAIN STATE FUNDS
April 18, 1991
Uncertainty about state funding for education hasn’t moved area school districts to give teachers pink slips, but school officials expect some tight times if the Kansas Legislature doesn’t put more money into public schools. Kansas school boards are required to notify teachers by April 10 if their contracts are not going to be renewed for the following school year. And with no decision from the Legislature on 1991-92 school funding levels, some Kansas districts have felt forced to lay off whole departments of teachers.
TRUCK PLOWS THROUGH GUARDRAIL
April 18, 1991
A truck driver who apparently didn’t know Iowa Street ended at Sixth Street narrowly avoided serious injury late Wednesday when the truck he was driving crashed through a guardrail at the intersection and slid down a steep incline. Police said Kenneth E. Donaldson, 24, Hamburg, Ark., suffered only minor injuries in the accident, which occurred at 11:25 p.m. Wednesday as Donaldson was driving north on Iowa.
FUN OR EFFECTIVENESS?
April 18, 1991
U.S. Army Gen. Colin Powell went back to his home territory of New York recently and told people that our schools would work better if educators taught students the way the Army trains recruits. “I know schools can’t be run like an infantry platoon, but it seems to me it was kind of like one when I went to school,” the joint chiefs chairman told 800 political, business and labor leaders at a dinner sponsored by the Association for a Better New York. Powell returned to his old high school and the South Bronx neighborhood where he grew up. At Morris High School, from which he graduated in 1954 and went on to City College of New York and then to the Army, Powell began with a small tease.
S CHIEF LEAVES OBSCENITY DECISIONS TO COURTS
April 18, 1991
For a man persistently attacked by religious leaders for the way he does his job, John E. Frohnmayer talks about his mission at the National Endowment for the Arts in almost sacred terms. “The arts for me are trying to do some of the same things religion does,” Frohnmayer said in a Wednesday interview. “Both seek human fulfillment, and both communicate the desire for a better life and deal with the central issues of life.”
YOUNGER BROTHER BURIES JAYHAWKS, 12-3
April 18, 1991
Creighton erupted for eight runs in the sixth inning and clipped Kansas, 12-3, in college baseball here Wednesday afternoon. The Blue Jays parlayed five hits, two walks and two Kansas errors into the game-breaking frame and made freshman Alan Benes, younger brother of San Diego Padres pitcher Andy Benes, a seven-game winner.
HIPPIE TALES
April 18, 1991
They didn’t pick the title and they don’t much like the cover, but the editors of the newly released “Cows Are Freaky When They Look At You: An Oral History of the Kaw Valley Hemp Pickers,” say they’re satisfied with the content of their book of tales from Lawrence’s counter-culture days. As former Lawrence hippies themselves, “Cows Are Freaky …” editors David Ohle, Roger Martin and Susan Brosseau share a personal connection to the era they aimed to chronicle by way of oral history. They were here.
KU COMMENCEMENT CANCELED IF IT RAINS
April 18, 1991
Commencement ceremonies will be canceled for the first time in Kansas University history if rain falls on Lawrence on May 19, the day of graduation. James Scally, assistant to the chancellor, said today that the decision to cancel ceremonies in case of rain was made out of concern for people’s safety. In past years, commencement ceremonies were moved to Allen Fieldhouse during rain-outs. The last year that happened was 1981.
PROF SAYS EUROPEANS WARY OVER GERMANY
April 18, 1991
Germany is the only European country with an economy strong enough to help emerging democracies in the region, but that’s not a welcome prospect in the eyes of many Europeans, a Kansas University professor says. “I don’t believe Germany has any ulterior motives, personally,” said Ron Francisco, professor of Soviet and East European studies.
CHIEF
April 18, 1991
Ramon Gonzalez wants to reassure Perry residents that they do have police protection. Gonzalez, Perry’s part-time police chief, stressed that contrary to rumors, officers will continue to provide protection while the force is being reorganized.
TV MAKES SCHOOL NEWS FUN
April 18, 1991
Until recently, Tonganoxie Junior High School students listened each morning as the principal read the day’s announcements over the intercom. But now, school announcements have gone high-tech. An English teacher and a computer teacher teamed up a few weeks ago to intitiate an innovative program that allows students to participate in spreading the school’s news through a medium most youngsters will pay attention to television.
OLD NEST HAS NEW FACES
April 18, 1991
Standing at a public viewing area of Clinton Lake, spectators with binoculars peer about 300 yards across the water to where two fuzzy heads poke up out of a nest. The pair of bald eaglets first were spotted on April 7, said Dave Rhoades of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
CORRECTION
April 18, 1991
Because of a reporter’s error, Wednesday’s Journal-World incorrectly reported the manner in which the Lawrence school district chose to finance its purchase of the former Elks Club lodge, 3705 Clinton Pkwy., for use as administrative offices. The district already has paid for the building using capital outlay funds. If the district manages to sell its current administration center at 1919 Del., the proceeds will go into the capital outlay fund to help offset the purchase of the former Elks lodge.
MEETINGS TO EXPLAIN NEW CITY CODE
April 18, 1991
Lawrence is learning from Topeka’s mistakes in implementing a new set of mechanical codes and offering educational seminars on the newly adopted code. Ralph Pimentel, the city’s new mechanical code inspector, was an inspector in Topeka when that city implemented the code several years ago. Guiding the installation of heating, air-conditioning, boiler and exhaust systems, the new code becomes effective in Lawrence on June 1.
LLOYD BRYANT
April 18, 1991
Lloyd W. Bryant, 64, Kansas City, Kan., died Wednesday at his home. No services will be conducted, and cremation was planned. Mr. Bryant was born in Eudora and lived in that area most of his life. He was a machinist for the Marley Cooling Tower Co. for 10 years, retiring in 1990. A Navy veteran of World War II, Mr. Bryant was a life member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars in Lawrence and a member of the American Legion in Olathe.
REGENTS APPROVE TUITION INCREASES FOR KU STUDENTS
April 18, 1991
The Kansas Board of Regents today amended tuition rates for the 1991-92 academic year, set rates for 1992-93 and scuttled a proposal to grant Missouri and Oklahoma students a tuition break. The board unanimously voted to raise tuition this fall by 8 percent for residents and 15 percent for non-residents.
AUDITORS
April 18, 1991
The yearly audit of Lawrence Memorial Hospital not only was a “clean opinion” of the hospital’s financial operations in 1990, but it also gives a good idea of upcoming problems in the health care industry that LMH has been preparing to deal with for years. Ray Custer, a certified public accountant with Coopers & Lybrand CPA, Kansas City, Mo., told the LMH Board of Trustees on Wednesday that their study of the LMH books found “no material weaknesses” in the hospital’s financial operations.
$50,000 BEQUEST TO HONOR TEACHING
April 18, 1991
A $50,000 bequest from the Ned N. Fleming Trust will establish an endowed fund to reward outstanding teaching at Kansas University. The bequest to the KU Endowment Association will provide two annual awards for outstanding teachers with distinguished records of teaching, scholarship and service and whose focus is on the human values in business.
TO THE EDITOR
April 18, 1991
Politically correct line To the Editor:
TO THE EDITOR
April 18, 1991
Tax and destroy To the Editor:
91
April 18, 1991
Earth Day ‘91 will officially be observed on Monday, but an Earth Day Carnival will be staged Friday at Kansas University. Jennifer Gilbert, marketing promotions coordinator for Student Union Activities and a member of Environs, the two groups that are sponsoring the carnival, said about 700 children will be bused to KU to take part in the carnival.
CHAMBER OFFERS HELP TO FIX APPRAISAL
April 18, 1991
A Lawrence Chamber of Commerce official today offered four suggestions including creating a taxpayer advisory board to prevent future reappraisal problems. Hank Booth, the chamber’s chairman, made the suggestions this morning at a press conference at the chamber’s offices. The suggestions were a result of a private meeting Wednesday between chamber and county officials.
TO THE EDITOR
April 18, 1991
Service is no joke To the Editor:
TO THE EDITOR
April 18, 1991
School finance To the Editor:
APPRAISAL WOES LINKED TO COMPUTER
April 18, 1991
A key factor in Douglas County’s continuing problems with property appraisal is an “archiac” mainframe computer that generates the valuation reports, a county official said Wednesday night. The problem, said County Administrator Chris McKenzie, is that the county’s computer could not merge separate files of appraisal information.
T VOTE ON NATURAL AREASAT LEAST NOW
April 18, 1991
Without taking a vote, the Douglas County Commission on Wednesday decided that the Douglas County Natural Areas program would compete for funding with other items in the county’s budget. Although a petition drive to force a vote on the natural areas program fell short, commissioners had said they would consider letting voters decide whether the county should create and fund the program. Wednesday’s decision will allow the program to move ahead without a public vote, at least for now.
NEA CHAIRMAN RECEIVES TASTE OF LOCAL SCENE
April 18, 1991
For 40 minutes Wednesday, Lawrence arts leaders came face to face with the chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts. And the chairman, John E. Frohnmayer, said he liked what he saw and heard.
RAINBOLT RETURNS TO RELAYS
April 18, 1991
Steve Rainbolt knows a challenge when he sees one. Competing in the decathlon at age 33 qualifies. So does selling real estate in Dallas in the mid-1980’s.
ONE-ACT PLAYS EXPLORE PAIN, HUNGER OF THE SOVIET SOUL
April 18, 1991
Under another director, the two Soviet plays now being presented at Kansas University could be more examples of dirty-fingernail melodrama. But director Elena Kreindlina, on an exchange from the Soviet Union, infuses “Cinzano” and “Smirnova’s Birthday” with an expressionistic vitality that is persuasive and occasionally stunning.
KU MORTAR BOARD INDUCTS 36 NEW MEMBERS
April 18, 1991
Thirty-six Kansas University students have been inducted into the KU chapter of Mortar Board. After the formal initiation ceremony Sunday, the students and their families attended a reception given by Chancellor and Mrs. Gene A. Budig at the chancellor’s residence.
FAMED VIOLIST BRINGS UNIQUE SOUND TO KU STAGE
April 18, 1991
Many people spend years seaching for direction in life. Robert Vernon is not one of them. Somebody put a stringed instrument into his hands, and the rest was history for Vernon, the principal violist at the Cleveland Orchestra.
FLUTE, GUITAR PROVIDE LYRICAL EVENING
April 18, 1991
It’s a good match
KPL CHIEF DISCUSSES MERGER
April 18, 1991
Several factors cause profound changes in industry structures, says the top officer of KPL Gas Service. “In my opinion there are three: changes in economics, in technology and customer demand,” said John Hayes Jr., KPL president and chief executive officer.
CITY, FIREFIGHTERS CLOSE TALKS ON WORK PACT
April 18, 1991
For the first time in at least 20 years, work agreement negotiations between the city and its firefighters will be conducted behind closed doors. Also for the first time, the negotiations will result in binding contracts, the result of recent court decisions binding the city to the work agreements it reaches with its employees.
HOSPITAL REPORT
April 18, 1991
DISMISSALS Randall Bagwell, Lawrence.
KANSAS FRESHMAN WANTS JAVELIN TITLE
April 18, 1991
It hasn’t taken Heather Berlin long to adjust to college track. Kansas’ freshman javelin thrower from Liberal has competed in three meets and won all three.
ROLE IN GULF WAR RAISED PROFILE OF UNITED NATIONS, OFFICIAL SAYS
April 18, 1991
People who once thought little about the role the United Nations plays in world affairs suddenly have become more curious. James Olson, executive director for national programs for the United Nations Assn. of the United States, said increased public interest is one result of President Bush’s appeal to the United Nations for a series of censures against Iraq that eventually resulted in the Persian Gulf War.