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Archive for Sunday, April 7, 1991

Also from April 7

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CHARLES E. WATSON SR.
April 7, 1991
Funeral services are pending for Charles E. Watson Sr., 67, Lawrence, who died Saturday at the Veterans Administration Hospital, Topeka. He had cancer. Mr. Watson was born Sept. 16, 1923, in Omaha, Neb. He was a veteran of World War II and served in both the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Army Air Corps.
JAMES T. FARLEY
April 7, 1991
Services for James Theron Farley, 66, Sundre, Alberta, Canada, are pending at Rumsey Funeral Home. Mr. Farley died Thursday in Calgary, Alberta.
LAWRENCE TAKES BASEBALL TWINBILL
April 7, 1991
Lawrence High’s baseball team pounded 35 hits and scored 38 runs in earning a doubleheader sweep of Manhattan on Saturday at Kansas State’s Frank Myers Field. The Lions claimed the opener, 18-13 in seven innings, and the nightcap, 20-6, in a run rule-shortened five innings.
SIRENS SHOULD SOUND
April 7, 1991
To the Editor: I wonder what the storm warning units cost and how much to maintain and test them. How many times have they actually been used?
STAYING
April 7, 1991
Kansas assistant basketball coach Jerry Green announced Saturday that he has withdrawn his name from consideration for the head coaching vacancy at Virginia Tech. “I am flattered to be considered for the very attractive position,” Green said. “However, leaving the University of Kansas and Roy Williams turned out to be more difficult than I thought.”
BOARD TO CONSIDER TRANSFER PLAN
April 7, 1991
Approximately 150 Lawrence elementary students could be transferred to different schools next year as part of a boundary committee’s recommendation for relieving overcrowded grade schools. The Lawrence school board will consider the proposed boundary changes as well as other alternatives during its regular meeting at 7:30 p.m. Monday at the Lawrence High School library, 1901 La.
FOR THE RECORD
April 7, 1991
Law enforcement report Burglaries and thefts reported
DEMOCRATS HOPE TO USE CLOUT THIS WEEK
April 7, 1991
When the Kansas House of Representative and the Kansas Senate cannot agree, attempts at compromise are made by a conference committee comprised of three members of each body appointed by House Speaker Marvin Barkus, D-Louisburg, and Senate President Bud Burke, R-Leawood. Rep. Betty Jo Charlton, D-Lawrence, who earned her master’s degree in political science at Kansas Univerity and later taught political science there, says the “bicameral theory” is supposed to come into play during these committee meetings.
NOVELIST AWAITS FILM BASED ON HER FAVORITE SLEUTH
April 7, 1991
Sometime this summer Kathleen Turner will stride across the screen as V.I. Warshawski, the fictional Chicago detective with a knack for insurance investigations. And when she does, Lawrence native Sara Paretsky will be in the audience, watching to see just what Hollywood did to her well-known character.
LOCAL ARTS
April 7, 1991
Local glassblowers to be featured in fair Two Lawrence artists will be featured at the 26th annual Riverbend Art Fair over Memorial Day weekend, May 25-26, at the Atchison downtown mall. The artists, James A. Slough and William R. Rector, are glassblowers at Free State Glass in Lawrence. The third featured artist is Carolyn Simon Peters of Wichita. About 100 artists are expected to display their works, including oils, woodworking, watercolors, weaving, stained glass, stoneware, photography, ceramics and fine jewelry.
FIRST THE DANCE, THEN THE MUSIC
April 7, 1991
Usually we think of the music coming before the dance. The composer writes the work, and then the choreographer creates a dance that follows its tempo and mood. Forget it. Sometimes it works the opposite way, as in “Caracole,” a dance piece that will receive its premiere run Friday and Saturday at the next Kansas University Dance Company performance.
YELLOWJACKETS ALBUM OFFERS HIGH ENERGY
April 7, 1991
GREENHOUSE, The Yellowjackets Featuring Bob Mintzer (GRP GRD-9630): The amalgam of the L.A.-based Yellowjackets and the hot New York tenor saxophone and reeds of Bob Mintzer is a stroke of genius. Indeed, in this East Coast-West Coast coalition, everyone wins. On “Brown Zone,” for example, Mintzer grabs his bass clarinet in a pointillistic post-bop abstraction in which the pastel-fusions one expects from the Yellowjackets are transfused with bold, neon gestures of Jackson Pollock-intensity. Of special note are Russell Ferrante’s dazzling pianistics; here, as elsewhere, there are moments when Ferrante surges with the thrust of a McCoy Tyner, or even Cecil Taylor. For Ferrante’s evocative title track, a string orchestra conducted and arranged by Vince Mendoza is added; and. like the transcendent Stan Getz-Eddie Sauter Third-Stream collaboration Focus, Mintzer’s soaring saxophone (this time soprano) implodes as well explodes. It’s a bold, exciting venture.
SLIGHT INCREASE IN MILL LEVY TO BE DISCUSSED BY BOARD
April 7, 1991
The Lawrence school board on Monday will consider approving a mill levy increase of less than half a mill to help support the school district’s Adult Basic Education Program. State law allows a school district board to issue a mill levy of up to one-half mill to support adult basic education programs. A mill is $1 of tax levied for every $1,000 of assessed property evaluation.
TAX ISSUES AWAIT VOTE IN LAST DAYS OF SESSION
April 7, 1991
The 1991 Kansas Legislature may have saved the worst for last. With only a week left in its regular session, the Legislature has yet to make the painful fiscal choices many lawmakers have said are inevitable.
RUNDLE
April 7, 1991
Mike Rundle remembers his decision to run for city commission in 1987 as an act of desperation. “Probably right up to the day I filed, I swore I would never get involved in politics,” Rundle recalled last week. “It was a desperate act. I had been trying to find other people who I felt I could support. It became that old question of, `If not me, who?’”
LOCAL EFFORT IS 1ST OF MANY STEPS TO REUSE GLASS, STEELALUMINUM
April 7, 1991
“Think Globally, Act Locally,” a motto of the environmental movement, tells only part of the story. Although recycling is fueled by grassroots initiative, it’s hardly a process that’s completed in our own back yard.
FANS CHEER TEAM ONE MORE TIME
April 7, 1991
Thousands of Jayhawk fans lined Massachusetts Street Saturday to cheer the Kansas University men’s basketball team, as it wound its way through downtown in a parade celebrating the 1990-91 season. “I think it’s great,” Alonzo Jamison, junior forward. “This shows what kind of fans we have.”
EDUCATION RESPONSIBILITY
April 7, 1991
It is difficult to understand the thinking of many Kansas legislators. At a time when lawmakers claim they cannot find sufficient state dollars to fund the Kansas Board of Regents universities at a level comparable to their peer institutions or money to fund the third year of the critical Margin of Excellence program, the state Legislature still is considering adding Washburn University to the regents system.
PENNY
April 7, 1991
The role he played on the Lawrence City Commission may have cost him his seat, David Penny said last week. After serving one two-year term, voters ousted Penny in Tuesday’s election. And while he thinks he made the city more efficient and profitable, Penny said his efforts to hold the line on city support of special interests could be to blame for his defeat.
FORUM
April 7, 1991
Greater tolerance is the key to understanding and appreciating the dozens of cultures and approximately 250 different ethnic groups represented in Lawrence, participants at a forum said Saturday. “The United States, the world, is changing very rapidly,” said Felix Moos, Kansas University professor of anthropology. “This city will have to make a monumental effort to address some of the problems that will come with the changes.”
THE SOUL OF CONSIDERATION
April 7, 1991
Cheryl Flanagan climbs the mounting block stairs in the riding arena, fits her booted foot into the saddle stirrup and swings herself onto the broad back of the big, white Lipizzaner stallion. The horse prances a few steps in place, the black wrappings on his legs a visual counterpoint to his white coat, and awaits his rider’s command.
SENATOR
April 7, 1991
On the surface at least, Sen. Wint Winter Jr., R-Lawrence, agrees that there appears to be a widening split between the Republican-controlled Senate and the Democrat-controlled House over state tax policies. But the senator, who since the session began has been at odds with most members of his party in the upper chamber while calling for additional state revenues, thinks fellow senators may be coming around.
NOTES AND QUOTES. . .
April 7, 1991
Notes and quotes while wondering why Kansas and Duke have never met in football… Since most Division I schools purchase new basketball uniforms every season, look for those American flags sewn on during the Persian Gulf war to disappear quietly next year…
SANDS, JOHNSON ON SHELF
April 7, 1991
Injuries forced Glen Mason to play what amounted to musical tailbacks with Tony Sands, George White and Chaka Johnson last autumn. That scenario hasn’t changed during spring drills.
KANTRONICS TUNES INTO MARKET NICHE
April 7, 1991
Most people probably have never seen one of Phil Anderson’s products. But they’re a mainstay with amateur radio buffs who transmit computer data across radio frequencies.
BARD EXCELS, BUT OSU STOPS KANSAS TWICE
April 7, 1991
Don’t believe Mike Bard when he says he rarely hits the ball hard. “That stuff in the gap, for me it’s a mistake. I’m just a singles hitter,” said Bard, Kansas’ senior designated hitter.
OTT-RAGEOUS
April 7, 1991
In Michael Ott’s latest work so late it was a pencil drawing on his easel just a couple of weeks ago he’s copied the outline of a John Steuart Curry painting of a corn stalk. But instead of ears of corn hanging off the green stalk, Ott plans to paint Doritos snack bags.
HOSPITAL REPORT
April 7, 1991
BIRTHS Keith and Kathy Morris, Lawrence, a boy, Saturday.
MUSIC OF THE VIRGIN HIGHLIGHTS CONCERT
April 7, 1991
Now, class, please define “Collegium Musicum.” “It was a 16th-century music group that gathered to look at performing old music, primarily at German universities,” said Jean Widaman, a Kansas University assistant professor of music history. “They weren’t necessarily for the purpose of public performances. Most of the musicians were pleased to get to know antiquated music.